WORKPLACE BEHAVIOUR REPORT

SELF
EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT
WORKPLACE BEHAVIOUR REPORT
oladimeji lawal
15 June 2022
Strictly Confidential

ABOUT THIS REPORT
This report presents the results of a self assessment for oladimeji lawal that reflects how well oladimeji
demonstrates emotionally intelligent behaviours in the workplace. The information contained is sensitive, private
and confidential.
Every effort should be made to ensure that this report is stored in a secure place, provided only to the intended
recipient(s) and used only for its express purpose. The survey and this report were designed by Genos
International based on sound scientific theory and research. The results presented in this report are, however,
based on individual’s responses to the survey questions. As such, Genos International makes no warranties
regarding the accuracy or reliability of the results. No advice or information contained in this report shall create
any warranty not expressly stated herein. No person(s) should act or fail to act on the basis of the results
contained in this report. Intended recipients should consult professional advice about any matter affecting them.
ABOUT GENOS
We help professionals improve emotional intelligence in order to enhance their impact, influence and resilience.
To learn more about our unique approach and the difference we make to people’s working lives, visit our
website:
www.genosinternational.com
COPYRIGHT
Copyright © 2022 Genos International Pty Ltd
No part of this publication may be reproduced or retransmitted in any form or by any means electronic or
mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or use of any information storage or retrieval system, for any
purpose without the express permission from Genos International Pty Ltd.
Ref: P-410146-8A914112366FB0E503D0E890EC8E023F

CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION 2
ABOUT THE SURVEY 4
RESULTS AT A GLANCE 6
SELF-AWARENESS 8
AWARENESS OF OTHERS 10
AUTHENTICITY 12
EMOTIONAL REASONING 14
SELF-MANAGEMENT 16
POSITIVE INFLUENCE 18
FEEDBACK TIPS AND TECHNIQUES 20

2 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
INTRODUCTION
Everyone has emotions. It‘s a simple fact – a part of our being human. And whether we realise it or
not, these emotions impact us every day. They also impact those around us, both in the workplace
and in our personal lives.
Think about it for a moment. Think of a time when you experienced an emotion; for example, joy.
Perhaps you had a great weekend or accomplished a difficult task at work. How did this emotion
impact your mood, your energy levels and the conversations you had with friends or co-workers?
Now think of a different emotion; for example, anger. Perhaps a co-worker said something that
‘rubbed you the wrong way‘ or you thought that a friend betrayed a confidence. How did this
emotion impact your mood and your behaviours? Perhaps you sent an angry email or said
something in the heat of the moment that you later regretted.
Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a set of skills that help us better perceive, understand and manage
emotions in ourselves and in others. Collectively they help us make intelligent responses to, and use
of, emotions. These skills are as important as your intellect (IQ) in determining success in work and
in life. Everyone, no matter what job function, has interactions with other people. Your capacity to
understand your emotions, to be aware of them and how they impact the way you behave and
relate to others, will improve your ‘people‘ skills and help you ultimately be more satisfied and
successful.
Last, but not least, some great news! Emotional Intelligence can be developed and improved over
time. All that is required is practice, a desire and commitment to improve and a foundation of selfawareness. This personalised EI report is designed to provide this foundation of self-awareness. It is
the starting point for a development journey.
This report will provide you with:
Insight into how important it is that you demonstrate emotionally intelligent workplace
behaviour.
Insight into how well you currently demonstrate emotionally intelligent workplace behaviour.
Practical tips on how to obtain additional feedback from others on your emotional intelligence
and how to effectively respond to it.

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal 3
THE GENOS MODEL OF EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT
COMPETENCIES
Emotionally intelligent competencies are based on emotional intelligence. The questions in the
Genos survey that measure these competencies reflect what people do with their emotional
intelligence in the workplace.
UNPRODUCTIVE
STATES
CORE EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
COMPETENCIES
PRODUCTIVE
STATES
Disconnected
Insensitive
Untrustworthy
Limited
Temperamental
Indifferent
Self-Awareness
Awareness Of Others
Authenticity
Emotional Reasoning
Self-Management
Positive Influence
Present
Empathetic
Genuine
Expansive
Resilient
Empowering
The competencies, shown in yellow on the model above, help us consistently demonstrate the
productive being states on the right side of the model, as opposed to the unproductive being states,
that we can all be at times, on the left side of the model.

4 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
ABOUT THE SURVEY
The Genos survey measures how well you believe you demonstrate emotionally intelligent
workplace behaviours in comparison to others. The better you demonstrate the behaviours
measured, the more effective your relationships and work should be. Particular insight into how
important you believe the behaviours are to your work has also been established by the survey.
When you completed the survey you were asked to indicate:
(a) How important you believe it is that you display the behaviours in question and
(b) How well you believe you demonstrate the behaviours in question.
Example Results
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
4.5
3.8
The rectangle over the second result bar represents the range of scores that are ‘average’ or typical
in the Genos norm group, that is, between the 25th and 75th percentile (Level of Demonstration
only). The Genos norm group comprises a representative workplace sample of individuals who have
taken the Genos assessment.
If your score (represented by the horizontal bar) is:
Within the rectangle this means that your score is within the average range.
To the left of the rectangle this means that your score is in the bottom quartile for this
competency.
To the right of the rectangle this means that your score is in the top quartile for this competency.
The responses you made to each of the questions measuring the competencies of the model are
also presented. Discrepancies between Importance and Demonstration at the item level are
highlighted in a traffic light methodology, as described on the following page.

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal 5
Scores for importance that are equal to or lower than scores for demonstration are
considered to be aligned. These could be your strengths.
Scores for importance that are one higher than demonstrated are considered to be
misaligned. Steps should be taken to close gaps on these behaviours.
Scores for importance that are two or more higher than demonstrated are
significantly misaligned. Focused attention and actions should be taken to close
these gaps.
Your self-assessed results, presented in this report, provide insight into how well you believe you
demonstrate the skills and behaviours that were measured. Use this insight to reflect on your
strengths and consider how you might leverage these when interacting with others. Also use it to
reflect on opportunities for improvement and consider actions you might take to improve in these
areas.
Item Results Example

Self-Awareness I D d
1. Demonstrating awareness of the way you feel. 4 2 2
2. Demonstrating awareness of the impact emotions can have on
your thinking.
5 4
1
3. Demonstrating awareness of the impact your feelings can have on
how you interact with others.
4 5

If your Level of Demonstration result for a given item is greater than the Level of Importance result,
a green circle with a tick inside it is presented. Research suggests that the better you demonstrate
the behaviours of the survey the more effective your personal and interpersonal skills will be. There
will almost always be some discrepancies between how important the behaviours are and how well
you demonstrate them. Use the size of these discrepancies to prioritise your development actions
at the end of this report.

6 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
RESULTS AT A GLANCE
Your overall results for each of the six emotionally intelligent competencies are summarised on this
page. These results represent your average response to the questions measuring each competency.
More detailed item results are presented in the subsequent pages.
Self-Awareness
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
3.7
3.1
Awareness Of Others
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
4.0
3.6
Authenticity
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
3.0
3.0
Emotional Reasoning
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
3.4
3.4
Self-Management
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
4.3
3.7
Positive Influence
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
4.1
4.0

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal 7
“While successful businesses must focus on market penetration,
product differentiation, shareholder return and customer loyalty,
those that really succeed are those that balance employee needs
with these other factors. Ultimately, how people feel about their
work and their connection to it drive these business outcomes.”
– Jon Katzenbach

8 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
SELF-AWARENESS
Self-Awareness is about being aware of the way you feel and the impact your feelings can have on
decisions, behaviour and performance. Your overall results for Self-Awareness are shown below.
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
3.7
3.1
The table below shows the response you provided to each of the questions measuring this
competency.

Self-Awareness I D d
1. Demonstrating awareness of the way you feel. 2 2
2. Demonstrating awareness of the impact emotions can have on
your thinking.
4 2
2
3. Demonstrating awareness of the impact your feelings can have on
how you interact with others.
4 4

4. Asking others for feedback on your behaviour. 5 4 1
5. Responding effectively to feedback from others. 5 4 1
6. Demonstrating awareness of your mood. 2 2
7. Behaving in a way that is consistent with how you describe yourself
to be.
4 4

KEY
I = Level of Importance
D = Level of Demonstration
d = Difference

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal 9
“Your vision will become clear only when you look into your heart.
Who looks outside dreams. Who looks inside awakens.”
– Carl Gustav Jung
INSIGHTS
ACTIONS
BENEFITS

10 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
AWARENESS OF OTHERS
Awareness of Others is about perceiving, understanding and acknowledging the way others feel.
Your overall results for Awareness Of Others are shown below.
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
4.0
3.6
The table below shows the response you provided to each of the questions measuring this
competency.

Awareness Of Others I D d
1. Accurately acknowledging the way others feel. 4 3 1
2. Recognising others’ non-verbal emotional cues (e.g., body
language).
4 4

3. Noticing when someone needs support. 4 4
4. Relating well to others’ feelings. 4 4
5. Accurately viewing situations from others’ perspective. 4 4
6. Adjusting your behaviour so that it fits well with others. 4 3 1
7. Accurately anticipating responses or reactions from others. 4 3 1

KEY
I = Level of Importance
D = Level of Demonstration
d = Difference

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal 11
“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget
what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
– Maya Angelou
INSIGHTS
ACTIONS
BENEFITS

12 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
AUTHENTICITY
Authenticity is about openly and effectively expressing oneself, honouring commitments and
encouraging this behaviour in others. Your overall results for Authenticity are shown below.
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
3.0
3.0
The table below shows the response you provided to each of the questions measuring this
competency.

Authenticity I D d
1. Sharing how you feel with others. 1 1
2. Describing your own feelings in a way that is sensitive to the
feelings of others.
1 1

3. Expressing your feelings in the right place and time. 4 4
4. When necessary, facilitating challenging conversations effectively. 3 3
5. Being consistent in what you say and do. 4 4
6. Encouraging others to express themselves. 4 4
7. Honouring commitments and keeping promises. 4 4

KEY
I = Level of Importance
D = Level of Demonstration
d = Difference

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal 13
“Authenticity is the alignment of head, mouth, heart, and feet –
thinking, saying, feeling, and doing the same thing – consistently.
This builds trust, and followers love leaders they can trust.”
– Lance Secretan
INSIGHTS
ACTIONS
BENEFITS

14 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
EMOTIONAL REASONING
Emotional Reasoning is about using the information in feelings (from oneself and others) and
combining it with other facts and information when decision-making. Your overall results for
Emotional Reasoning are shown below.
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
3.4
3.4
The table below shows the response you provided to each of the questions measuring this
competency.

Emotional Reasoning I D d
1. Reflecting on feelings when decision-making. 1 4
2. Asking others how they feel about potential solutions to problems. 5 4 1
3. Considering issues from multiple perspectives. 5 4 1
4. Involving others in decisions that affect their work. 4 4
5. Demonstrating awareness of biases in decision-making. 1 1
6. Communicating decisions in a way that is sensitive to others’
feelings.
4 3
1
7. Using your organisation’s values effectively when making important
decisions.
4 4

KEY
I = Level of Importance
D = Level of Demonstration
d = Difference

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal 15
“We know too much and feel too little of those emotions from which
a good life springs.”
– Bertrand Russell
INSIGHTS
ACTIONS
BENEFITS

16 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
SELF-MANAGEMENT
Self-Management is about managing one’s own mood and emotions; time and behaviour; and
continuously improving oneself. Your overall results for Self-Management are shown below.
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
4.3
3.7
The table below shows the response you provided to each of the questions measuring this
competency.

Self-Management I D d
1. Responding effectively in stressful situations. 4 3 1
2. Demonstrating a positive, energising demeanour. 4 3 1
3. Adapting effectively to different/changing circumstances. 4 4
4. Responding effectively to criticism from others. 4 4
5. Managing your time effectively. 4 4
6. Controlling your anger at work. 5 4 1
7. Improving yourself. 5 4 1

KEY
I = Level of Importance
D = Level of Demonstration
d = Difference

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal 17
“The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising
every time we fall.”
– Nelson Mandela
INSIGHTS
ACTIONS
BENEFITS

18 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
POSITIVE INFLUENCE
Positive Influence is about positively influencing the way others feel through problem solving,
providing feedback and recognising and supporting others’ work. Your overall results for Positive
Influence are shown below.
Not at all
important
Slightly
important
Fairly
important Important important Highly
Significantly Less
Than Others Less Than Others Average/Typical More Than Others Significantly More Than Others
Level of
Importance
Level of
Demonstration
4.1
4.0
The table below shows the response you provided to each of the questions measuring this
competency.

Positive Influence I D d
1. Providing useful support to others. 5 4 1
2. Helping others resolve workplace conflicts. 4 4
3. Helping others respond effectively to stressful situations. 4 4
4. Responding effectively to others’ inappropriate behaviour. 4 4
5. Helping create a positive work environment. 4 4
6. Responding effectively to others’ feelings. 4 4
7. Positively influencing the way others feel. 4 4

KEY
I = Level of Importance
D = Level of Demonstration
d = Difference

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal 19
“A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the
way.”
– John Maxwell
INSIGHTS
ACTIONS
BENEFITS

20 Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour Self Report – oladimeji lawal
FEEDBACK TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
To obtain good quality feedback from others on your emotional intelligence and effectively respond
to it, consider the tips and techniques presented below.
1. Give the person from whom you want feedback the topic or concept you would like to discuss,
i.e. emotional intelligence. Provide them with an overview of the model and type of skills and
behaviours associated with it.
2. Let the person know that you would like feedback on this topic in terms of (a) what you do well
and (b) what you could do more of or do more effectively. These two elements of feedback are
important.
3. Give people time to prepare. Provide people with at least a couple of days notice so they can
prepare their feedback. Give them the topic and framework questions to help create a
structured and considered discussion.
4. When you are in the feedback session ask the person to be specific where possible and to
provide examples.
5. When giving feedback, people sometimes make quite vague statements, such as, “You could be
better at dealing with people”. When you hear similar statements, ask probing questions like,
“When you say I could be better at dealing with people, what are some specific actions I could be
taking?”
6. Do not justify or put things into context. Avoid saying, “Yes, but, because…”. Putting things into
context can sound defensive and hinder the feedback process. Remember, their perception is
their truth. It is not about whether it is right or wrong, it is about understanding how others
perceive you.
7. Ask for actions that could be implemented to address the feedback. Say things like, “If you were
in my shoes, what would you start doing to address this feedback?”
8. Towards the conclusion of the feedback session be authentic about what you will and will not
address. It is important to hear all feedback and not to justify. Equally, you may not agree with
everything or think that all things are relevant. Whether you provide rationales for these should
be considered in the specific context you are in with the person giving you the feedback.
9. Set a follow-up time to establish progress and review actions implemented. Meeting again with
the person 2-3 months later is usually a good timeframe to revisit the conversation and actions
taken.
10. Thank them.

UNPRODUCTIVE
STATES
CORE EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
COMPETENCIES
PRODUCTIVE
STATES
Disconnected
Insensitive
Untrustworthy
Limited
Temperamental
Indifferent
Self-Awareness
Awareness Of Others
Authenticity
Emotional Reasoning
Self-Management
Positive Influence
Present
Empathetic
Genuine
Expansive
Resilient
Empowering
Global Headquarters Sydney
Phone:
+61 2 8004 0413
[email protected]
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