researcher?  Role of student and supervisor Reading: Textbook

Module 01 Delivered by Prof. Yun Yang ICT80011/40005 – Research Methods2 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Outline  Introduction to Research Methods (based on Unit Outline)  What is research & a researcher?  Role of student and supervisor Reading: Textbook Chapter 1 Extra reading: Phillips&Pugh Chapters 3, 4, 7, 8 and 11 Note: more or less interchangeable terms for this Unit: – research question, project problem, project objective3 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Aims Students who successfully complete this unit of study will be able to:  identify the basic principles of academic research and the fundamental concepts of research methodology  interpret and critically evaluate previously published work in a formal literature review  describe the characteristic features of common research methods and debate their relative merits  identify a research question (or project problem/objective) and justify the selection of an appropriate and ethically managed research method  produce a written research/project proposal/report/paper and effectively present information in an oral presentation4 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Unit objectives (and assessment) After successfully completing this unit, you should be able to:  present research/project ideas – Note: assignment 1  write – Note: (examination: final assessment)  Research/project proposals  Research/project reports and/or papers  conduct research (or project) – Note: assignment 2: MCQ for basic concepts5 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Unit content  Defining research  Specifying roles of student and supervisor  Developing a research/project question/problem/objective  Presentation techniques  Reviewing the literature  Planning research/project design  Ethics  Writing a research/project proposal  Critical thinking  Qualitative and quantitative research methodologies  Writing a research paper and a technical report with corresponding writing skills6 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Key generic skills for this unit of study You will be provided with feedback on your progress the following generic skills: in attaining  analysis skills,  problem solving skills,  communications skills,  ability to tackle unfamiliar problems, and  ability to work independently What should you be prepared? – a quiz in classroom7 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne What isn’t research?  Research is not mere information gathering discovery) (e.g. information  iRnefosremaarctiho nis ( en.ogt. mineforermly artuiomnm cahgeicnkgi nagr)ound for hard-to-locate  tRoe asneoatrhcehr is(e n.go.t, mfaecrt ed tisracnosvfeorrym)ation of facts from one location8 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne What is research?  Originates with a question or problem  Requires a clear articulation of a goal  Usually divides the principal problem into more manageable subproblems  Is guided by the specific research problem, question or hypothesis  Accepts certain critical assumptions  Follows a specific plan of procedure  Requires the collection, analysis and interpretation of data resolve the problem that initiated research in an attempt to  iGntoearle: sintecdre oars ceo unncdeernrsetdanding of a phenomenon about which we are Have you got any (research) ideas?10 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Researcher (Phillips & Pugh, 2002) Someone who has:  something interesting to say that peers want to hear  knowledge of their area sufficient to evaluate the worth that area of other work in  ability to discover where they can make a contribution  awareness and conformity to ethical principles  mastery of appropriate techniques and awareness of their limitations  ability to communicate results in professional arena  awareness of international arena Swinburne’s definition of an active researcher11 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Student perspective Why are you doing research?  Make a contribution to your chosen field  Satisfaction of doing research for its own sake  Enhance career opportunities  Can’t think of anything else to do!12 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Supervisor perspective Why do supervisors take a research student?  Contribution to building or maintaining a research profile  Satisfaction of watching a student gain the skills and confidence to become an independent researcher  The opportunity to discuss problems and teach in their area of specialisation13 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Supervision styles  The student as an autonomous researcher age” model) (“coming of Swtourdke anst iins deivxipdeucatlesd to develop their own research topic and  The student as an apprentice iSnttuedreesntt, wbuotr khsa voen fpreroebdleomms t or eelaxtpelodr eto supervisors area of  Student expected to follow a protocol set out by the supervisor14 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne How not to submit a thesis (1)  Not wanting to do the hard work  More about determination than brilliance  Not understanding what is required  Overestimating: Your work should show some you don’t have to win a Noble prize or precipita oteri gai npaalirtayd, ibgumt shift tUonpdice r–ersetiqmuairteinsg a: nRaelysseias rachn dw eoxrkp lnaonta tjuiosnt ao fd ae srecsriepatirocnh of a question – a thesis is not a text book15 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne How not to submit a thesis (2)  Having a supervisor who is not clear about requirements  Expects too little  Expects too much  Losing contact with your supervisor  Taking on too much outside work16 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Managing your supervisor (1)  What supervisors expect:  Independence  Submission of written work that is not just a avoid typos, incomplete sentences etc.) first draft (i.e.,  Regular meetings Agree on frequency of meetings Set up a timetable if possible pBree pwaerlel dp r(etipmairnegd, agnivdin mg atekxet iitn e aadsvya fnocr ey,o suer tstiunpge ar vtiospoirc tfoo rb e discussion)17 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Managing your supervisor (2)  Honesty in reporting progress  Let your supervisor know if you are having problems (e.g., if you are “blocked”, lost confidence or are having personal difficulties)  Follow their advice when you ask them for it  Enthusiasm (be excited about what you are doing), surprise your supervisor with new evidence and thoughts17 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Managing your supervisor (2)  Honesty in reporting progress  Let your supervisor know if you are having problems (e.g., if you are “blocked”, lost confidence or are having personal difficulties)  Follow their advice when you ask them for it  Enthusiasm (be excited about what you are doing), surprise your supervisor with new evidence and thoughts19 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne Managing your supervisor (4)  Joint supervision (2)  Make sure all three of you meet early to discuss how the project will develop  Send each supervisor a copy of what you are writing – but make it clear whether it is “for your information only” or “for comments”  Keep each informed of what you are doing20 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne What you expect from your supervisor (1)  Supervision  Regular meetings Minor frequent meetings Less frequent formal meetings  Read your work well in advance  Written comments and ov
erall evaluation  Be available when you need them  Be friendly, open and supportive21 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne What you expect from your supervisor (2)  Constructive criticism  Harsh criticism is not appropriate  Praise is important  Good knowledge of research area  Encourage discussion in meetings  Point you in the direction of interesting information or relevant  aTnadk er eacno imntmereensdt iyno fuu rtoth oetrhinegr yreosuer acracrheeesr) (i.e., introduce22 ICT80011/40005 (Research Methods), © Swinburne The process (for research degree)  Enthusiasm  Isolation  Increasing interest in work – developing self confidence  Gaining independence from supervisor  Boredom  Frustration  A job  Getting in first

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