Portfolio assignment

Portfolio assignment

Overview

The labs and pre-work for this course are designed to provide you with the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the concepts covered in workshops. The portfolio assessment task aims to assist with this by ensuring completion of the designated portfolio work.

Timelines and Expectations

Percentage Value of Task: 10%

Due:Sunday, May 5th, Week 7, 23:55 pm.

Minimum time expectation: 5 hours

Learning Outcomes Assessed

The following course learning outcomes are assessed by completing this assessment:

  • K1. Explain fundamental strategies for problem solving
  • K2. Relate goal-setting and plan formulation to problem solving
  • K3. Compare and contrast commonly used problem solving strategies
  • K4. Describe tools and techniques that can be used to model and describe problems
  • K5. Describe the value of reflection, attitude and self-efficacy towards success in problem solving
  • S1. Decompose a problem and create goals and plans to solve that problem
  • S2. Devise and implement problem solving strategies which can be applied to a range of IT problems
  • S3. Develop and verify algorithms based on conceptual models used in programming
  • S4. Construct documentation describing how to solve a problem
  • A1. Apply problem solving strategies, tools and techniques to solve problems in a variety of domains

Assessment Details

From week 1 to week 7 inclusive, the learning materials will contain a selection of tasks in which you need to create and contribute to a personal work portfolio. A list of all these tasks is included in the marking guide provided. This assessment requires you to complete and collate all these tasks for submission as a portfolio documenting your work and learning throughout these weeks.

Submission

Your completed portfolio must be submitted in the Portfolio submission link in Moodle by the due date and time. You will not be able to edit your Portfolio once it has been submitted.

You must submit your Portfolio as a singledocument containing each week’s activities via the Portfolio Assignment submission link on Moodle. Depending on the file size of your document (and any appendices e.g. Excel spreadhsheet) you may wish to use WinZip or the Windows compression tool, and submit the compressed file directly for Moodle submission.

Marking Criteria

All portfolio tasks must be completed to be eligible for full marks for this assessment. Available marks will be reduced for incomplete work.

Knowledge-based tasks will be assessed based on the correct and accurate use or description of the theory. Do you know what the particular theory is, when it applies, how to explain it clearly?

Reflection-based taskswill be assessed based on the quality of the reflection. Is it thoughtful and insightful? Does it show that you have considered the topic from different angles and recognized areas for potential improvement and / or areas that have been done well, things you have learnt, recognition of difficulties faced?

Applied skill-based tasks will be assessed based on your approaches to applying the skills.

  • Do your attempts to solve problems demonstrate that you have planned your approach, considered multiple approaches (throughout the portfolio – not necessarily on the one task, although this would sometimes be appropriate), thoughtfully chosen a way to proceed and that you are willing to take risks, make mistakes and both learn and recover from mistakes?
  • Do your modelling attempts demonstrate abstraction, the use of correct techniques and appropriate representation of the problem or scenario?
  • Do your attempts to develop problems demonstrate understanding of the theory? Are your problem statements clearly and concisely written? Are the problems pitched at an appropriate level of difficulty?
  • Do your attempts to apply different thinking techniques show that you understand how to use each approach? When you choose the thinking approach yourself, is your selection appropriate for the type of problem? Have you made your thinking strategies and the reasons for your choices visible to the reader?

Marking Guide

Week Task Marks Available
2* Growth Mindset video *(from pre-work)  
Short summary of video content 2
Reflection on video content  
o    What you have learnt 1
o    How this applies / does not apply to you 1
o    The impact this has on you 1
3 Decision Matrix  
Creation of Excel spreadsheet for “what to eat for next meal” 1
Inclusion of criteria for selecting the “best” option 2
Evaluation of options against criteria 2
4 Develop Your Own Activity (Changing States)  
Creation of a unique problem that requires analysis to determine the state of the system. 2
Problem is non-trivial and suitably complex for intended audience 1
Problem demonstrates an understanding of changing states 1
Valid solution provided 1
5 Build-Your-Own Scenario (UML Diagrams)  
Development of a unique scenario to generate UML diagram (any of: Activity Diagram, Class Diagram, State Chart Diagram, Use Case Diagram) 2
Scenario is non-trivial and suitably complex for intended audience 1
Scenario demonstrates understanding of the purpose of the selected UML diagram 1
Valid solution provided 1
6 Envelope #1: Sudoku  
Identification of strategies and explanation of why these are appropriate 1
Solution tested to evaluate instructions. Changes identified to fix problems. 1
Solution tested with “Tough” problems to evaluate instructions. Reflection on strategies and approach 2
Human Against Machine: Reflection on difficulty of developing instructions for problems of this type and why computers solve these problems more quickly than people 1
6 Envelope #2; Pins  
Identification of strategy / technique used to develop a winning algorithm. Discussion of what was discovered using this process (OR: if algorithm not developed after genuine attempt, discussion of process followed and issues encountered) 2
Testing solution against computer to determine effectiveness of algorithm 1
Human Against Machine: Generalize algorithm to work out how to win from any starting position, using explanation or graphical representation (OR, if generalization not identified, develop table showing numbers and outcomes to try to identify pattern) 2
6 Envelope #3: A Century of Sundays  
Identification, justification and evaluation of strategy / technique used to generate solution 1
Identification of alternative strategy / technique to generate solution 1
Comparison of both strategies / techniques for efficiency at obtaining accurate solution 1
Use of an identified strategy / technique to obtain solution to provided variant of the problem 2
Human Against Machine: Observations comparing own efforts to obtain solution against computer’s efforts used to develop and justify recommendation for completing similar tasks 1
6 Envelope #4: Noughts & Crosses  
Identification of strategy / technique to not lose, for either playing first or playing second 1
Evaluation of effectiveness of strategy 1
Human Against Machine:  
o    Results of playing computer 5 times at each level 1
o    Observations of results and discussion of possible algorithms the computer uses at each level 2
6 Envelope #5: Spies  
Identification of strategy / technique 1
Reason for choosing strategy / technique and discussion about whether other strategies / techniques were considered 1
Reflection on number of possible strategies available and consideration of how to help identify when multiple strategies may be available for solving problems 2
Human Against Machine: Discussion of observations from computer simulation 1
7 Rock, Paper, Scissors  
Development of algorithm to determine who will win the game 2
Algorithm repeats until one player wins three rounds 2
  TOTAL: 50

Feedback

Marks will be uploaded in fdlMarks and a completed marking feedback sheet uploaded in Moodle within 2 weeks of the assessment due date.

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is the presentation of the expressed thought or work of another person as though it is one’s own without properly acknowledging that person. You must not allow other students to copy your work and must take care to safeguard against this happening. More information about the plagiarism policy and procedure for the university can be found at http://federation.edu.au/students/learning-and-study/online-help-with/plagiarism.

Week 2

Growth Mindset video *(from pre-work)

Short summary of video content

The video was inspiring. It reflects the skills, availability, and struggle for the living. As shown in the example in video of the difference between zoo tiger and the jungle tiger, how the jungle tiger can survive on its own, searching for shelter, food and defending itself whereas zoo tiger can’t. So the conclusion of the video is to be independent on our own. The more we struggle, try the more we learn, we gain ideas.

Reflection on video content

  1. What you have learnt
  • To be independent on our own
  • To struggle
  • Live by own.
  1. How this applies / does not apply to you

This content is applied in our daily life. As we work, struggle for our living, food, whereas we can’t survive without our struggle unless there is someone to take care of ours. So we can learn many things, gain new ideas which make us tough, intelligent and independent.

  1. The impact this has on you
  • To live our lives struggling,
  • To learn the new ideas
  • To be self-dependent.
Decision Matrix
Creation of Excel spreadsheet for “what to eat for next meal”





Inclusion of criteria for selecting the “best” option




Evaluation of options against criteria








Develop Your Own Activity (Changing States)
Creation of a unique problem that requires analysis to determine the state of the system.



Problem is non-trivial and suitably complex for intended audience




Problem demonstrates an understanding of changing states




Valid solution provided
Build-Your-Own Scenario (UML Diagrams)
Development of a unique scenario to generate UML diagram (any of: Activity Diagram, Class Diagram, State Chart Diagram, Use Case Diagram)

Scenario is non-trivial and suitably complex for intended audience

Scenario demonstrates understanding of the purpose of the selected UML diagram


Valid solution provided





Envelope #1: Sudoku
Identification of strategies and explanation of why these are appropriate Tip 1: Look for rows, columns of 3×3 sections that contain 5 or more numbers. Work through the remaining empty cells, trying the numbers that have not been used. In many cases, you will find numbers that can only be placed in one position considering the other numbers that are already in its row, column, and 3×3 grid. Tip 2: Break the grid up visually into 3 columns and 3 rows. Each large column will have 3, 3×3 grids and each row will have 3, 3×3 grids. Now, look for columns or grids that have 2 of the same number. Logically, there must be a 3rd copy of the same number in the only remaining 9-cell section. Look at each of the remaining 9 positions and see if you can find the location of the missing number.



Solution tested to evaluate instructions. Changes identified to fix problems.



Solution tested with “Tough” problems to evaluate instructions. Reflection on strategies and approach
Playing Sudoku with the above tips is interesting and it helps to increase our sense of time. We will learn how to make a decision and take an action with less hesitation. So, any kind of Sudoku problem is solved by this process.



Human Against Machine: Reflection on difficulty of developing instructions for problems of this type and why computers solve these problems more quickly than people
Refrences Board games Strategy. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.boardgamestrategy.com: Counting to 21 Strategy Sudoku. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.sudoku.com: https://sudoku.com/ Sudoku. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.sudoku.com: https://sudoku.com/


Envelope #2; Pins
Identification of strategy / technique used to develop a winning algorithm. Discussion of what was discovered using this process (OR: if algorithm not developed after genuine attempt, discussion of process followed and issues encountered) Step 1: First you need to get them to say 19 or 20; therefore, if you say 18, you will win. Step 2: So to say 18, you need to get them to say 16, or 17, so if you say 15, you will win. Step 3: Continuing on, if you say 12 you will win Step 4: Next you need to say 9 or 6 or 3, you will win, Step 5: So, if you go second, you can guarantee that you will say 3, and you can win every time

Testing solution against computer to determine effectiveness of algorithm
If you go first, just hope that they don’t know the dominant strategy and mess up one time. Once that happens, you can get back onto the winning track and win every time.

Human Against Machine: Generalize algorithm to work out how to win from any starting position, using explanation or graphical representation (OR, if generalization not identified, develop table showing numbers and outcomes to try to identify pattern)




Refrences

Board games Strategy. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.boardgamestrategy.com: https://boardgamestrategy.blog/2017/02/13/counting-to-21-strategy/

Envelope #3: A Century of Sundays
Identification, justification and evaluation of strategy / technique used to generate solution






Identification of alternative strategy / technique to generate solution







Comparison of both strategies / techniques for efficiency at obtaining accurate solution






Use of an identified strategy / technique to obtain solution to provided variant of the problem






Human Against Machine: Observations comparing own efforts to obtain solution against computer’s efforts used to develop and justify recommendation for completing similar tasks
Envelope #4: Noughts & Crosses
Identification of strategy / technique to not lose, for either playing first or playing second



Evaluation of effectiveness of strategy




Human Against Machine:
o    Results of playing computer 5 times at each level
o    Observations of results and discussion of possible algorithms the computer uses at each level
Envelope #5: Spies
Identification of strategy / technique



Reason for choosing strategy / technique and discussion about whether other strategies / techniques were considered



Reflection on number of possible strategies available and consideration of how to help identify when multiple strategies may be available for solving problems




Human Against Machine: Discussion of observations from computer simulation
Rock, Paper, Scissors
Development of algorithm to determine who will win the game






Algorithm repeats until one player wins three rounds






Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *