International Arbitration

Module Study Guide
Academic Year 2021–2022
LW70091E – International Arbitration
Level: 7
Credits: 20

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Table of contents
Key team contact details……………………………………………………………………………………………………4
1 Module overview 5
Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….5
Module summary content and aims………………………………………………………………………….5
Learning outcomes to be assessed………………………………………………………………………….5
Indicative Contact Hours ………………………………………………………………………………………..5
2 Assessment and feedback 7
Summative assessment grid …………………………………………………………………………………..7
Assessment brief including criteria mapped to learning outcomes………………………………..7
Learning materials…………………………………………………………………………………………………7
3 Things you need to know 9
Engagement…………………………………………………………………………………………………………9
Need help, just ask………………………………………………………………………………………………..9
Getting support for your studies …………………………………………………………………………….10
Student support…………………………………………………………………………………………………..10
Module evaluation – have your say!……………………………………………………………………….10
Key team contact details

Module Leader Dr. Matteo Zambelli
Subject Area & School/College Law, School of Law
Email [email protected]
Location St Mary’s Road, Ealing

 

Course Administrator Kim Hyland
Email [email protected]
Phone 0208 231 2505
Location Office for the LL. B (Hons) (HT.GF.004)

 

Subject Librarian Susan McGlamery
Email [email protected]
Phone 0208 231 2377
Location Library, 2nd floor, St Mary’s Road

The Course Leader and the Head of Subject responsible for this module is Dr Philipp Elliot-Wright,
and can be contacted at [email protected]
The Head of School responsible for this module is Mr Philip Ells, and can be contacted at
[email protected]
The External Examiner responsible for this module is Mr Edwin Parks, a Senior Law Lecturer with
the Open University.

1 Module overview
The module is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills related to the law and practice
of international arbitration. Students will benefit from the combination of instruction on theoretical and
practical aspects of arbitration procedure and will have the opportunity to be exposed to practical
elements.
The aim of this module is to enable students to understand the theory and practice of international
arbitration. Students will develop an understanding of the main principles of both international
commercial and investment arbitration and how these systems of dispute resolution are employed in
international business environment.
Introduction
We have introduced UWLFlex – our new, online, flexible learning platform.
UWLFlex has been designed to complement face-to-face learning and build on our reputation for
excellence in teaching, learning and student support. We will be able to deliver a University experience
that is more collaborative, active, and relevant for an increasingly digital world thus enabling us to provide
you with an improved student experience. UWLFlex will provide you with an enhanced range of online
tools, to help facilitate your learning whether this takes place primarily on site or online.
Module summary content and aims
The aim of this module is to enable students to understand theory and practice of international
commercial law. Students will develop understanding of the nature of merchants in international
context, of core principles of contract and tort law, as well as the sale of goods. The module will also
focus on shipping and maritime law.
Students will develop skills and critical appreciation of international commercial law in international
context. The course will enable students to embark on careers in the legal sector with an international
dimension.
The aim of this module is to enable students to understand the theory and practice of international
arbitration. Students will develop an understanding of the main principles of both international
commercial and investment arbitration and how these systems of dispute resolution are employed in
international business environment.
This module is of relevance to those seeking to practice commercial law in any jurisdiction. It is not just
dispute resolution lawyers who need to understand these issues – transactional lawyers also need to
understand and advise implications of arbitration as a dispute resolution mechanism.
The content of the module is the following:

Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4
Week 5
Introduction to Arbitration and Methods of Alternative Dispute Resolution
The Agreement to Arbitrate a Dispute, Drafting Arbitration Clauses
Law Applicable to Substance and Procedure
The Arbitral Tribunal: Establishment, Powers, Duties
Jurisdictional issues in international arbitration

 

Week 6
Week 7
Week 8
Week 9
Week 10
Week 11
Week 12
Week 13
Week 14
Arbitration Procedure and Evidence
Interaction with domestic courts during arbitral proceedings
Challenges to arbitration awards
Advanced Issues. Arbitration in Practice
Advanced Issues. Specialist arbitration – 1
Advanced Issues. Specialist arbitration – 2
Advanced Issues. Remedies. Multi party arbitration
Advanced Issues. Arbitral Awards: Recognition and Enforcement
Reflective Journal

Learning outcomes to be assessed
Upon successful completion of the module, students
1. Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the main principles of alternative dispute resolution and
its differences from litigation.
2. Understand the issues of applicable substantive and procedural law and conflict of law issues
arising in international arbitration with particular emphasis on the UNCITRAL Model Law.
3. Compare and contrast the procedural elements and dynamics of international commercial
arbitration procedure and mediation related to dispute resolution under various arbitration and
mediation rules.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the international arbitration process, such as concluding drafting
arbitration agreements, submissions to the tribunal, communications with the parties as well as
award and procedural orders.
5. Demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research in relation to international arbitration.
Indicative Contact Hours

Teaching Contact Hours 48 hours
Independent Study Hours 152 hours
Total Learning Hours 200 hours

2 Assessment and feedback
Summative assessment grid

Type of
Assessment
Word Count
or
equivalent
Threshold
(if Professional
Body-PSRB
applies)
Weighting Pass
Mark
Submission
due-date &
time
Method of
Submission &
Date of
Feedback
Reflective
Journal
2,000 25% 50% 50% Week 14 Turnitin
Submission, 3
weeks after
submission
Written
Assignment
2,000 25% 50% 50% Week 13 Turnitin
Submission, 3
weeks after
submission

Assessment brief including criteria mapped to learning
outcomes
This module has the following assessments:
Assessment 1: (Formative)
Formative is an assessment designed to provide students with feedback and inform you of your
progress to date. It will not contribute to overall assessment mark.
Several questions to be answered in essay format on Blackboard.
Weighting: 0%
Assessor: one lecturer/tutor
Assessments (Formative)
After the work has been marked, feedback will be given.
As part of these Assessments, student should be able to do the following:
Follow instructions given for all assessments (including the exam assessment);
Complete the task set on time (by the given hand-in date for all assessments and during
the examination;
Demonstrate sound English literacy and grammatical accuracy;
Be able to use a word processor (PC);
Demonstrate basic statistical and analytical tasks;
Be able to use the Internet as a research tool;
Be able to use email in order to communicate effectively with the course tutors and other
students;
Demonstrate wider reading and research ability, by reading ‘around’ the given topics;
Be able to compile and cite a learned bibliography and use footnote or endnote
referencing during report writing;
Refer to statutes that influence the jurisdiction.
Assessment 1: Summative
A Summative is an assessment designed to measure your success or failure of performance
against the ‘Learning Outcomes’. All summative work contributes to overall assessment mark. An
essay or legal scenario related to a current legal issue.
Length: 2,000 words excluding footnotes and bibliography.
Timing: Week 13; the assignment will be released three weeks in advance (week 10)
Assessor: At least two tutors
Weighting: 50%
Assessment 2: Reflective Journal
A reflective journal of 2,000 words will need to be submitted. Such work shall demonstrate
substantive reflective comment on the module.
All students must maintain an evaluative/self-reflective journal that will form part of the final
assessment of this module in which they will analyse and evaluate what they have learnt about the
respective topics (and their implications) addressed in the lectures.
Length: 2,000 words excluding footnotes and bibliography.
Timing: Week 14 (i.e. 3 weeks after the last lecture).
Assessor: At least two tutors
Weighting: 50%
Assessment Criteria

80-100%:
Upper First
Shows exceptional performance at a level of distinction which
surpasses the requirements associated with the 70 – 79 level in at
least one of the following:
a. Originality in conceptual understanding and synthesise
including critical evaluation, hypothesis, methodological
approach or application;
b. Critical analysis and evaluation of current research;
c. Greater understanding of research, methodology and ethical
implications with subtlety in communication
d. Advanced appreciation of data
Examples of this may be work at such a high quality that comfortably
sits within this level or would merit further study i.e. PhD or refereed
publication. In addition, this will be exceptionally well written and
presented.

 

70―79%:
First Class
Performance that is superior at distinction level falling short of being
exceptional, surpasses the criteria associated with the 60 – 69 level in
several of the following areas:
a. Originality in conceptual understanding and synthesise
including critical evaluation, hypothesis, methodological
approach or application;
b. Critical analysis and evaluation of current research;
c. Greater understanding of research, methodology and
ethical implications with subtlety in communication
d. Advanced appreciation of data
Work falling into this level will be well written and presented with a very
strong potential to pursue research at doctoral level.
60―69%:
Upper 2nd
Performance that is very good at merit level which may include
superior achievement in the criteria suggested by the 70 – 79 level but
lacks consistency. Work falling in this band will surpass the quality of
work produced in the 50 – 59 range
in several areas of the following
areas:
a. Deployment of information that goes beyond simple reliance on
standard secondary sources;
b. Clear and coherent argument;
c. Some critical insight and evaluation
d. Evidence of advanced analysis and management of data.
Similarly work that falls within this band will be well written and
presented with some possibility of pursuing research at doctoral level.
50―59:
Lower 2nd
Satisfactory performance at pass level, this work will fall short of the
60 – 69 level in
several of the following:
a. Grasp of principal materials relevant to the subject with partial
causal link with sustained argument from premises to
conclusions
b. Logical structure not properly thought through
c. Some evidence of analytical and critical ability to handle data
sources and evidence
d. Unlikely to demonstrate originality in thought and methodology
Work falling in this level may be well written and presented with no
obvious faults.
40―49%:
Fail
Failure, being below satisfactory performance. This work will be similar
in characteristic to work in the 50 – 59 level but will be insecure in
some
of the following key areas:
a. Concept and grasp
b. Content
c. Demonstration in understanding
d. Sustenance in logic and coherency
e. Analytical and critical evaluation
f. Presentation

 

0―39:%:
Serious
Fail
Serious Failure. This work will:
a. Lack in relevant material to the subject
b. Lack structure
c. Be significantly incomplete or unbalanced
d. Show major errors
e. Rely too heavily on secondary sources
f. Contain garbled, incomplete and confused information
g. Contain argument that is inadequately supported by evidence
h. Scrappily presented coupled with inadequate citation
i. Lacks critical appraisal nearing plagiarism
j. Does not acknowledge sources

For guidance on online submission of assignments, including how to submit and how to access online
feedback, please refer to the UWL Blackboard student-help pages at:
uwl.ac.uk/blackboardhelp
Learning materials
The reading list for this module is available on Blackboard in the module area and online by searching
uwl.rl.talis.com. This shows real-time availability of books in the library and provides direct links to online
resources, recommended by your lecturer.
Remember to log into Blackboard daily to receive all the latest news and support available at
your module sites!
Subject guides (subject-guides-libguides) are also available to help you find relevant information for
assignments, with contact details of the Academic Support Librarian for your School.
You are reminded that the University applies penalties to students who commit an academic
offence, in which case the
Academic Offences Regulations will be used to deal with any cases of
academic misconduct including examination offences, plagiarism, use of ghost-writing services
and other means of cheating to obtain an advantage.

3 Things you need to know
Engagement
Teaching at UWL during the academic year 2021-22 will be conducted using the UWL Flex model and
may involve a range of on site and online teaching and learning activities. Whether you are engaging
with teaching and learning activities on site or via the UWL Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), we
expect the same level of commitment and engagement from you. If you are unable to attend scheduled
on site or online activities or complete activities in the time frames set out, you should let your tutors
know. You should aim to stick to assessment deadlines; if you are concerned that you will not be able
to complete your assessments on time, you should talk to your tutors. Your engagement, whether
online or on site, will be tracked and if we see that you are not engaging, we will get in contact with you.
However, we encourage you to let us know if you are having problems so we can work with you to find
solutions and get you back on track as soon as possible. Give yourself the best possible chance to
succeed by engaging with the full range of learning and teaching activities available to you.
All students should refer to the
Attendance and Engagement Monitoring Policy particularly if your
course is accredited by a professional body, or if you are an International student on a Tier-4 visa, or a
student on an Apprenticeship course which have additional requirements.
Need help, just ask
The University recognises that there are times when you may encounter difficulties during your course
of study and provisions are made to help you. If you think you will be unable to meet deadlines please
talk to us, whether it’s your course/module leader, personal tutor or any member of staff, so they can
get you the support you need to succeed. You can extend your deadline if you have a good reason
why you are not able to submit a piece of coursework on time,
apply online for an extension before
your deadline. If an extension is not sufficient and circumstances beyond your control are
preventing you from completing your assessment, then you can,
apply online for mitigation.
Please remember late submission without extension or mitigation may result in penalties depending on
how late it is, see University
Academic Regulations.
You are encouraged to seek advice from the Students’ Union Advice Service;
UWLSU support you with
all aspects of your academic experience by providing advice and guidance to ensure you are fully
informed of the academic regulations set out by the University as well as being an advocate for student
views.
You are expected to behave in line with UWL expectations, irrespective of whether your interactions
with staff and other students are in person or online. As you will be engaging with others online and
with a range of online materials, it is important to consider how to stay safe online and ensure your
communications are secure and appropriate. If you have any questions about how to manage your
online UWL activities, please contact your module leader.
If you have an issue about the module, you should speak to your Module Leader or Course Leader
informally in the first instance. Your Course Representative can also raise your concerns at Course
Committees, which take place each semester. If you are unable to resolve it informally, you should
refer to the Complaints Procedure which is outlined in the
student handbook and consult the Students’
Union about it. The University aims to ensure that issues are resolved informally as quickly as possible
to have minimum impact on your studies.

Getting support for your studies
Throughout your course of study, you will have access to a wide variety of sources of support
depending on your individual circumstances and needs. Your first point of call for getting general
academic support is your Personal Tutor. As well as approaching your Module Leader with any
questions specifically related to your module and your Course Leader with questions on your Course,
do contact your Personal Tutor or Apprenticeship Support Link Tutor for academic advice in relation to
your studies and your academic development.
Apart from the University-wide support framework, which encompasses the Module Leaders, Course
Leader, the Subject Librarian, and your Course Administrator, you will also have at your disposal the
UWL Engagement Team. The Engagement Team offers One-to-One Academic Support opportunities
helping you to develop skills relevant to your degree. Academic Skills Workshops throughout the year
include the following:
Essay Planning and Writing
Critical Thinking
Reflective Writing
Group Work and Presentation Skills.
Maths Support and English Language Support opportunities are available too. For more information or
to register for weekly updates email
[email protected] or you can visit the website to find
out more about the support offered by the Engagement Team, such as Peer Mentoring or online
academic skills resources at:
uwl.ac.uk/current-students/support-current-students/academic-support
Student support
In addition to the support listed in the previous section, there is also more help offered by UWL Student
Support Services. The Student Hub is located in The Street at St Mary’s Road, Ealing campus, but
offer drop-in sessions at all UWL sites. They offer a wide range of support and advice services
consisting of Student Advice, and Funding & Immigration advice; Careers; Counselling;
Disability/Mental Health; Inter-faith Advisor; Placement & Employment; Volunteering; Student Welfare;
and Scholarships and Bursaries. You can book your 1-2-1 appointment at
https://studenthub.uwl.ac.uk/
Contact Student Services (general) for more information at [email protected] or call
020 8231 2345.
Module evaluation – have your say!
Towards the end of the module you will be invited to provide some anonymous feedback to the Module
Leader through an online survey. This is your opportunity to give some direct feedback about the
module through a series of questions and free text. Your constructive feedback will help the Module
Leader and teaching team to understand the module experience from your perspective and helps
inform the development of the module. At the end of the survey period, a response to the survey will be
available so that you can see exactly how your voice has been heard.