Cumulative Project

MIT346 Cumulative Project

Addressing Design and OSPF Implementation 

For this project, you will be implementing a variety of networking skills you have learned throughout the CCNA3 course. You will develop a unique IP Addressing scheme as well as implement OSPFv2.

The project will consist of a Packet Tracer file that will meet a set of network requirements as well as a written Word document that will detail the various aspects of the network you created.

Each student will be responsible for working independently on this project and any questions can be directed to either the instructor or lab instructors. 

DO NOT COPY OTHER’S WORK. DO NOT SUBMIT WORK THAT IS NOT YOUR OWN. 

YOU MUST START YOUR OWN FILE, DO NOT TAKE SOMEONE ELSE’S FILE TO WORK WITH. à DOING SO WILL RESULT IN A GRADE OF 0 AND FAILURE IN THE COURSE

You will require the use of a home PC in order to work on this project (cannot be done on Mac)

When you first open the Packet Tracer file, you must enter your name, student email and student number as seen in the screenshot below before beginning your work. DO NOT USE GUEST LOGIN.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Network Scenario Prerequisites

To create your network, you will use your own student number as a reference for some of the steps. This will ensure that everyone will create a unique network. 

Each number in your student number will be given a letter as seen in the following example. There will be steps in the project that will indicate which letter to use for a value, refer to your student number for the specific value to use. 

Ex. Student #:   0723456  As an example, the student’s number is 0723456. A question may ask the student to create an IP address 192.168.C.D so the IP address that is used will be 192.168.2.3 according to their student number. 

Student Number/Letter Association

Student # 0 7 2 3 4 5 6
Letter  A B D E F G

 

Step 1: (2 Marks)

Fill in your own student number to see what association you will have.

Student Number/Letter Association

Student #              
Letter  A B D E F G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addressing Table 

The addressing table will use your student number to create the Public IP addressing scheme as well as the Private IP addressing scheme.

Step 2: (10 Marks)

Use the Student Number/Letter Association in order to find out what IP address you need to assign to a specific port and update the table with your new numbers.

Be sure to fill in the table as you go through the next steps

Device Port IP address Subnet Mask
 

R1

S0/1/0 16.211.115.66 255.255.255.0
S0/1/1 192.168.F.1 255.255.255.252
S0/0/0 192.168.F+10.1 255.255.255.252
 

Router-A

S0/1/1 192.168.F.2 255.255.255.252
     
     
 

Router-B

S0/0/0 192.168.F+10.2 255.255.255.252
     
     
 

Router-A1

S0/0/0 10.1.E.1 255.255.255.252
S0/1/0 10.1.E+2.1 255.255.255.252
S0/0/1 10.1.E+3.1 255.255.255.252
G0/0 192.168.F+15.1 255.255.255.0
 

Router-A2

     
     
     
 

Router-A3

     
     
     
 

Router-B1

     
     
     
     
 

Router-B2

     
     
     
 

Router-B3

     
     
     
PC-A1      
PC-A2      
PC-A3      
PC-B1      
PC-B2      
PC-B3      

Step 3 – Creating an IP Addressing Scheme (50 Marks)

For this step, you will add some routers to the network and create your own IP addressing scheme for the routers and PCs. 

1.       Add a router to the left and the right of R1 that will act as Area Border Routers

a.       Give them the name Router-A and Router-B

b.      Turn off the Routers and Add two HWIC-2T interfaces so that the Routers will have serial ports. Turn the routers back on (This will be required for any routers you add to the network) 

c.       Connect Router-A to R1 using their S0/1/1 ports

d.      Connect Router-B to R1 using their S0/0/0 ports

2.       On Router-A, connect 3 routers in a ring formation topology

a.       These 3 routers will be in Area D+1 (refer to your student# for D’s number, add 1)

3.       On Router-B, connect 3 routers in a ring formation topology

a.       These 3 routers will be in Area D+2 (refer to your student# for D’s number, add 2)

4.       Using Packet Tracer’s Draw tool (Rectangle or Oval found in the toolbar), draw a shape around the two new areas and label it using a note box

 

 

 

5.       Assign an IP address to each interface of the routers so that each interface of connecting routers belong to the same network

a.       Router-A1 is given in the table, apply the student# E to find the IP address.

i.      Using Router-A1 as a starting point in Area D and create your own IP addresses for Router-A2 and Router-A3 that will allow the network to function correctly

ii.      Go to Area D+1 and create IP addresses for the devices in that network as well

b.      Add each of the router’s to the addressing table above.

i.      You must fill in the Port, IP address and Subnet Mask

6.       Add switches to each of the Routers in the two new areas

a.       Add a PC to each of the Switches and assign the PC an IP address, subnet mask and default gateway 

b.      Record this information in the addressing table as well 

Step 3 – Static Route: (5 Marks)

Create a default static route on R1 that will point to the ISP.

Create a default static route on the ISP router that points towards R1. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 4 – OSPFv2: (60 Marks)

In this step, you will be implementing OSPFv2 on all routers except the ISP router. 

–          Enable OSPF on all routers 

–          Advertise all directly connected on all routers in the correct areas

–          On only the required routers, have the static default route advertised 

Once you’ve implemented OSPF, do the following tests and indicate whether they were successful or not (18 Marks)

Ping Test Success? (Yes/No)
PC-A3 à PC-A1  
PC-A2 à Router-A  
PC-A1 à Web Server  
PC-B2 à PC-B1  
PC-B3 à PC-A3  
PC-B1 à Web Server  

 

If any of the pings are not successful, do the required troubleshooting steps and try again

Sample Topology, yours may look different than this

 

MIT346 Cumulative Project

Addressing Design and OSPF Implementation 

For this project, you will be implementing a variety of networking skills you have learned throughout the CCNA3 course. You will develop a unique IP Addressing scheme as well as implement OSPFv2.

The project will consist of a Packet Tracer file that will meet a set of network requirements as well as a written Word document that will detail the various aspects of the network you created.

Each student will be responsible for working independently on this project and any questions can be directed to either the instructor or lab instructors. 

DO NOT COPY OTHER’S WORK. DO NOT SUBMIT WORK THAT IS NOT YOUR OWN. 

YOU MUST START YOUR OWN FILE, DO NOT TAKE SOMEONE ELSE’S FILE TO WORK WITH. à DOING SO WILL RESULT IN A GRADE OF 0 AND FAILURE IN THE COURSE

You will require the use of a home PC in order to work on this project (cannot be done on Mac)

When you first open the Packet Tracer file, you must enter your name, student email and student number as seen in the screenshot below before beginning your work. DO NOT USE GUEST LOGIN.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Network Scenario Prerequisites

To create your network, you will use your own student number as a reference for some of the steps. This will ensure that everyone will create a unique network. 

Each number in your student number will be given a letter as seen in the following example. There will be steps in the project that will indicate which letter to use for a value, refer to your student number for the specific value to use. 

Ex. Student #:   0723456  As an example, the student’s number is 0723456. A question may ask the student to create an IP address 192.168.C.D so the IP address that is used will be 192.168.2.3 according to their student number. 

Student Number/Letter Association

Student # 0 7 2 3 4 5 6
Letter  A B D E F G

 

Step 1: (2 Marks)

Fill in your own student number to see what association you will have.

Student Number/Letter Association

Student #              
Letter  A B D E F G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addressing Table 

The addressing table will use your student number to create the Public IP addressing scheme as well as the Private IP addressing scheme.

Step 2: (10 Marks)

Use the Student Number/Letter Association in order to find out what IP address you need to assign to a specific port and update the table with your new numbers.

Be sure to fill in the table as you go through the next steps

Device Port IP address Subnet Mask
 

R1

S0/1/0 16.211.115.66 255.255.255.0
S0/1/1 192.168.F.1 255.255.255.252
S0/0/0 192.168.F+10.1 255.255.255.252
 

Router-A

S0/1/1 192.168.F.2 255.255.255.252
     
     
 

Router-B

S0/0/0 192.168.F+10.2 255.255.255.252
     
     
 

Router-A1

S0/0/0 10.1.E.1 255.255.255.252
S0/1/0 10.1.E+2.1 255.255.255.252
S0/0/1 10.1.E+3.1 255.255.255.252
G0/0 192.168.F+15.1 255.255.255.0
 

Router-A2

     
     
     
 

Router-A3

     
     
     
 

Router-B1

     
     
     
     
 

Router-B2

     
     
     
 

Router-B3

     
     
     
PC-A1      
PC-A2      
PC-A3      
PC-B1      
PC-B2      
PC-B3      

Step 3 – Creating an IP Addressing Scheme (50 Marks)

For this step, you will add some routers to the network and create your own IP addressing scheme for the routers and PCs. 

1.       Add a router to the left and the right of R1 that will act as Area Border Routers

a.       Give them the name Router-A and Router-B

b.      Turn off the Routers and Add two HWIC-2T interfaces so that the Routers will have serial ports. Turn the routers back on (This will be required for any routers you add to the network) 

c.       Connect Router-A to R1 using their S0/1/1 ports

d.      Connect Router-B to R1 using their S0/0/0 ports

2.       On Router-A, connect 3 routers in a ring formation topology

a.       These 3 routers will be in Area D+1 (refer to your student# for D’s number, add 1)

3.       On Router-B, connect 3 routers in a ring formation topology

a.       These 3 routers will be in Area D+2 (refer to your student# for D’s number, add 2)

4.       Using Packet Tracer’s Draw tool (Rectangle or Oval found in the toolbar), draw a shape around the two new areas and label it using a note box

 

 

 

5.       Assign an IP address to each interface of the routers so that each interface of connecting routers belong to the same network

a.       Router-A1 is given in the table, apply the student# E to find the IP address.

i.      Using Router-A1 as a starting point in Area D and create your own IP addresses for Router-A2 and Router-A3 that will allow the network to function correctly

ii.      Go to Area D+1 and create IP addresses for the devices in that network as well

b.      Add each of the router’s to the addressing table above.

i.      You must fill in the Port, IP address and Subnet Mask

6.       Add switches to each of the Routers in the two new areas

a.       Add a PC to each of the Switches and assign the PC an IP address, subnet mask and default gateway 

b.      Record this information in the addressing table as well 

Step 3 – Static Route: (5 Marks)

Create a default static route on R1 that will point to the ISP.

Create a default static route on the ISP router that points towards R1. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 4 – OSPFv2: (60 Marks)

In this step, you will be implementing OSPFv2 on all routers except the ISP router. 

–          Enable OSPF on all routers 

–          Advertise all directly connected on all routers in the correct areas

–          On only the required routers, have the static default route advertised 

Once you’ve implemented OSPF, do the following tests and indicate whether they were successful or not (18 Marks)

Ping Test Success? (Yes/No)
PC-A3 à PC-A1  
PC-A2 à Router-A  
PC-A1 à Web Server  
PC-B2 à PC-B1  
PC-B3 à PC-A3  
PC-B1 à Web Server  

 

If any of the pings are not successful, do the required troubleshooting steps and try again

Sample Topology, yours may look different than this