CSC8001 Project – Marking Criteria.

CSC8001 Project – Marking Criteria Marks Out of Part Introduction Penalties -5 Report Structure -10 Written Presentation Comments: Introduction /10 • The report introduces the topic of the report including the selected country. The introduction includes facts and details about the selected country which are relevant to the focus of the report’s data analysis. Datasets /10 • Includes all relevant details necessary to enable the reader to reproduce the reports results. Details should include but not necessarily be limited to: o Source of datasets – provided by, available at, etc. o Details on how analysed data was identified and extracted from datasets o Examples of relevant information for the WHO database would be:  the WHO Mortality Database country code for your selected country,  the ICD files, Years and Lists used in your analysis,  a table with the code and causes of death descriptions for your country’s leading causes of death, as discussed in your report,  a table which indicates which causes of death codes you classified as a death due to injury or violence. Conclusion /10 • Summarize the main points discussed in your report, including your findings for the leading causes of death due to injury and violence for your country Analysis & Discussion /70 15 a. What are the current leading causes of injury deaths in your country? Graphs: • Provide a pie chart, with appropriate labels and percentages, which displays the top 8 leading causes of deaths due to injuries and violence based on your country’s most current year’s data. Include the remainder of the injury and violence deaths as other. • All graphs comply with the expected standards of visualisation: appropriate use of figure titles, axis labels, axis titles, and legend. Axis limits are consistent and appropriate for the type of data being presented. Discussion: • Discussion provides an appropriate answer to the question, drawing insights and presenting conclusions based on and supported by the data analysis presented. 20 b. Have injury deaths risen in rank over the last thirty years? Tables: • Provide tables which compare the top twenty causes of all deaths (not just due to injuries and violence) over the last thirty years, in fifteen year increments starting from the most current year’s data and going backwards. For example, if your country has data from 1950 to 2010 you will have a table displaying the top 20 causes of all deaths for the years 1980, 1995 and 2010. • All tables have appropriate table titles and column headings. Tabular display of data is consistent and aids readability. Graphs: • Provide a time series chart depicting how the top five current leading causes of injury and deaths have changed over the last thirty years. Your data should be in five year increments. For example, if your country has data from 1950 to 2010, your chart will include the years: 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2010. • All graphs comply with the expected standards of visualisation: appropriate use of figure titles, axis labels, axis titles, and legend. Axis limits are consistent and appropriate for the type of data being presented. Discussion: • Discussion provides an appropriate answer to the question, drawing insights and presenting conclusions based on and supported by the data analysis presented. 15 c. Are some groups more vulnerable to injuries and violence than others? Graphs: • Provide a vertical bar chart which displays the death rates by cause of injury and group for the most current year’s data. Use the top five current leading causes of injury and deaths (from part b), and the following groups: youths (ages 15-29, any gender), males (all ages) and females (all ages). • All graphs comply with the expected standards of visualisation: appropriate use of figure titles, axis labels, axis titles, and legend. Axis limits are consistent and appropriate for the type of data being presented. Discussion: • Discussion provides an appropriate answer to the question, drawing insights and presenting conclusions based on and supported by the data analysis presented. 20 d. Does poverty increase the risk of injury? Tables: • Compare your country’s deaths due to injury and violence to another country in your world region which has a different WHO income level classification. For example, per the provided LMIC-HIC_country_grouping document, Australia’s WHO region code is Wpr HI, indicating that Australia is in the West pacific region and is considered High income. So a good comparison country for Australia could be Vanuatu, with a WHO region of Wpr LMI. For each of your selected countries, provide a table with the top twenty causes of all deaths (not just due to injuries and violence) based on the most recent years data which is available for both countries. For example, if the most recent year’s data for one country is 2011, and the other’s is 2009, you should use the 2009 data for both countries. • All tables have appropriate table titles and column headings. Tabular display of data is consistent and aids readability. Graphs: • Provide a vertical bar chart displaying the percentage of all deaths due to injury and violence for both countries. • All graphs comply with the expected standards of visualisation: appropriate use of figure titles, axis labels, axis titles, and legend. Axis limits are consistent and appropriate for the type of data being presented. Discussion: • Discussion provides an appropriate answer to the question, drawing insights and presenting conclusions based on and supported by the data analysis presented. Penalties -15 Report Structure -5 Report contains all of the required parts listed below: • Introduction • Datasets • Analysis and Discussion • Conclusion • References Written Presentation -10 HD A B C F Writing style â–¡ Writing style is consistent throughout report. â–¡ â–¡ Writing style is mostly consistent throughout report. â–¡ â–¡ Writing style is sometimes consistent throughout report. â–¡ â–¡ Writing style is rarely consistent throughout report. â–¡ â–¡ Writing style is inconsistent or non-existent throughout report. Clear and appropriate paragraphing â–¡ All paragraphs are appropriately structured so each contains a single topic, and evidence and argument within them are logically ordered. â–¡ Paragraphs are mostly appropriately structured so that each contains one topic and evidence and arguments within them are logically ordered. â–¡ Paragraphs generally contain a single topic with related evidence and argument. â–¡ Some are less well developed (fragments) or have more than one topic (overly long). â–¡ Paragraphs show some arrangement into related ideas but the topic is implicit or unclear. â–¡ Paragraphs tend to be fragmentary or overly long. â–¡ Paragraph topics are unclear and there is little structure for ideas.  â–¡ Paragraphs are generally fragmentary or overly long. Grammar, punctuation, spelling â–¡ Your paper is free of grammatical and syntactic errors and demonstrates clarity, and sophistication, of expression. â–¡ Only a few grammatical or syntactic errors with generally clear written expression. â–¡ Some grammatical and syntactic errors but not so many so as to significantly affect the clarity of your written expression. â–¡ Significant evidence of grammatical and syntactic errors, which has affected the clarity of your written expression. â–¡ You have made many grammatical and syntactic errors, so your written expression is difficult to follow. Appropriate in-text referencing â–¡ In-text references skilfully integrated into the essay in a way that increases its authority. â–¡ All research appropriately referenced but some awkward instances. â–¡ Most ideas/evidence is reference but there are gaps or too much reliance on direct quotes. â–¡ Only some ideas are referenced; â–¡ Too much reliance on direct quotes for is
sues and concepts; â–¡ Only direct quotations referenced. â–¡ Few (if any) referenced ideas, facts or opinions. Appropriate reference list â–¡ Fully compliant with selected system. Few (if any) errors. â–¡ Compliant with selected system, with some errors. â–¡ Broadly compliant but inconsistent use of selected format. â–¡ Missing page numbers. â–¡ Inconsistent referencing system used and/or many errors are present. â–¡ â–¡ No consistent referencing standard applied.

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