Community Development

Unit Outline
CAS101 Community Development
COURSE Bachelor of Community Services
LEVEL OF STUDY 1st Year
CORE/ELECTIVE Core
CREDIT POINTS 15 Credit Points
TOTAL COURSE CREDIT POINTS 360 credit points
DURATION One trimester
LECTURE & TUTORIALS 2 hours lecture, 1 hour tutorial per week
PERSONAL STUDY HOURS 7 hours per week
TOTAL WORKLOAD PER WEEK 10 hours per week
PRE-REQUISITE Nil
CO-REQUISITE Nil
CONTACT DETAILS
Unit Coordinator
Felicity Oswell
Email:
[email protected]
Lecturers/Tutors:
MELBOURNE
Catherine Wall
[email protected]
SYDNEY
Felicity Oswell
Monday
Email:
[email protected]
Victor Milo
[email protected]
Thursday / Friday
Cameron McClean
Tuesday
[email protected]
2
BRISBANE
Scarlett Pragya
Tuesday
[email protected]
PERTH
Dr Tarquin Bowers (Lecturer/Tutor)
Wednesday
Email:
[email protected]
DESCRIPTION
This unit builds on the fundamental concepts of the community services framework. It examines the
community development’s conceptual approach to building active and sustainable communities in order
to enhance community social economic and environmental objectives. A community development
approach can be applied to many different areas including health, education, employment, enterprise
development, infrastructure and town planning. This unit examines the values, principles and practical
skills of capacity building. Furthermore, students will learn models of innovative community
development programs including, public housing, disadvantaged groups, rural areas and Aboriginal
communities.
GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES
Graduates of Stott’s College are expected to have Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSA) on three
different dimensions. Each unit in the course contributes to the development of Stott’s College’s
Graduate Attributes which you should demonstrate on completion of the course.

Professional
GA1 Hold a body of knowledge relevant to their field of study, that includes an understanding of
theories, practices, and the scope of their discipline;
GA2 Have the skills required to operate effectively within their chosen profession;
Personal
GA3 Have developed an appreciation, tolerance and ability to work effectively across the
entire diversity spectrum;
GA4 Be able to work independently and collaboratively;
GA5 Be able to set appropriate goals for ongoing intellectual and professional development;
GA6 Be self-critical and identify shortcomings in their own knowledge, skills and abilities;
GA7 Understand ethical responsibilities and behaviour pertinent to their chosen discipline

3

and profession and practice the behaviour to the highest standards;
GA8 Have developed a high level of oral, visual and written communication skills, across a
range of communication technologies, relevant to their fields of study, and recognise
the importance of maintaining these;
Academic
GA9 Be able to identify the need for data, information and knowledge to solve problems in
familiar and unfamiliar contexts using appropriate media, tools and methodologies
and be able to critically evaluate the information in terms of its validity, accuracy,
currency against one’s own values;
GA10 Be independent learners and thinkers with responsibility to acquire and evaluate new
knowledge with the confidence to be analytical, creative and critical;
GA11 Be able to understand, define, analyse, evaluate, investigate problems and make
informed recommendations and decisions.

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES
The Course Learning Outcomes (CLO) for the Bachelor of Community Services are designed to align
with the Australian Quality Framework specifications for Bachelor’s degrees (AQF Level 7). On
completion of the degree, graduates will have achieved these learning outcomes in the following
dimensions:

Knowledge
CLO1 Demonstrate broad knowledge of a range of community services theories and
frameworks.
CLO2 Develop an appreciation for the legal framework in which organisations and
communities operate.
CLO3 Demonstrate in-depth knowledge within specialist counselling areas, including
alcohol and other drugs, youth, family and mental health.
CLO4 Develop and apply an understanding of human diversity, including culture,
gender, age, ability, class, religion and sexuality.
Skills
CLO5 Critically review, analyse, and evaluate knowledge in community services
theories and frameworks.
CLO6 Integrate and apply knowledge of community services professional practice and
competencies within appropriate ethical and professional standards.
CLO7 Apply critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems in
case management interventions.
CLO8 Demonstrate advanced counselling and communication skills in dealing with
clients and other professionals.

4

Application of Knowledge and Skills
CLO9 Demonstrate applied research skills including projects.
CLO10 Identify clients with complex and diverse needs and develop appropriate service
provision.
CLO11 Practice case management ethically and intentionally within established legal,
policy and professional frameworks and codes of ethics.
CLO12 Integrate feedback from clinical supervision and cultivates the capacity for
reflective practice, professional responsibility, and accountability.

UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the completion of this unit, a student should be able to:

LO1 Demonstrate an understanding of the community development values and
principles
LO2 Explain capacity building models in different areas including health, education and
employment.
LO3 Discuss capacity building models for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
communities.
LO4 Discuss the application of community development frameworks in the area of
health, education and employment.
LO5 Analyse contemporary innovative community development programs and their
impacts on disadvantaged and marginalised groups.
LO6 Evaluate group processes and applied skills in group settings.

CONTENT 22
Topics will include:
1.
Introduction to community development
2. Community and culture, community cultural development and
community development programs
3. Principles and skills of community development practice
4. The nature of social disadvantage and marginalisation of groups
5. Building capacity for marginalised groups and social capital
6. Capacity building for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander and Refugee
peoples
7. Project development cycle and strategic community planning (for
initiating social action and change)

5
8. Participatory action research, Community Consultation and participation
and Community Development Strategy
9. Writing up your plan, Strategies, Sustainability and Monitoring and
Evaluation
10. Domestic community groups, NGO’s and aid organisations
11. Collaboration and Advocacy work and Budgeting/ Funding
12. Innovative community development programs in public housing.
LEARNING TASKS AND ASSESSMENTS
Assessment questions must be directed to your Tutor.
In order to pass this unit, students are required to achieve an aggregate mark
of 50% for all assessment tasks.
Refer to the Assessment Grades section at the end
of the unit outline for important information regarding awarding of grades.
Attendance is crucial to pass this unit.
Where required, you must use APA 7 Referencing in your assessments.

Assessment Weight Due Learning
Outcomes
Assessed
Course
Learning
Outcome
s
INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT
Essay (1000 – 1200 words)
20% Week 4 LO1 CLO1,2
INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT
Essay (1200 – 1500 words)
30% Week 8 LO2, LO3, LO4 LO1 -10
PROJECT
Part A: Individual Assessment
(Action Plan)
Part B: Group Presentation
40%
25%
15%
Week 11
Weeks 11-12
LO5, LO6 CLO2
CLO5-10
TUTORIAL
PARTICIPATION &
ATTENDANCE
10% Week 1 – 12 LO1-6 CLO1-10
TOTAL 100%

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WEEKLY OUTLINE

Week Topic Text reference and set
readings
Tutorial Activity
Week 1 Introduction to
community development
Willis (2011, chp1); Ife
(2016, chp3 & chp5);
Kenny ) 2016, chp 1)
Welcome & outline tutorial
activities and assessments
Small group activity and
discussion:
First share with your small
group a bit about yourself,
where you grew up and what it
was like for you to live in that
community?
What makes a community a
happy place to grow up in?
Watch: Take a street and build
a community: Shani Graham at
TEDxPerth 20 mins
https://www.youtube.com/w
atch?v=C1WSkXWSJac
Week 2 Culture, Community
Cultural development
and community
development programs
Ife (2016, chp 8)
Mendes & Binns (2013);
Eversole & Martin
(2010);
Mwanri et.al. (2012);
Mccormack, et.al. (2013);
Carey et.al.(2016)
Group tutorial:
In small groups discuss the video:
Pathway to Community
Development
https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=pn_tee5TQKc
and answer questions on the
Handout.
Week 3 Principles and skills of
community development
practice
Ife (2016, chp 12, & 13);
Community Tool Box
Section 9, Community
Action Guide: Framework
for Addressing Community
Goals and Problems;
Mendes (2008); Ingamells
(2010).
http://www.activehealthycom
munities.com.au/case
studies/
https://www.thechangeagenc
y.org/campaigners
toolkit/research
projects/case-studies/
CD principles. In small groups
choose one case study of interest
from the following website or
watch the video. Read through the
case study or after watching the
video, analyse which CD
principles/skills have been used.
Report back your findings to the
large group.
https://www.thechangeagency.o
rg/campaigners-toolkit/research
projects/case-studies/
OR
Video Community development
project in South Sudan
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0
Lw8lKZnh-4

7

Week 4 The nature of social
disadvantage and
marginalisation of
groups
Ife (2016, chp 8); Joinking
(2003), Cortis (2012).
Crawford et.al (2014) Kenny
(2016 chp 2)
Small Group activity:
In order to start working on your
project ideas for Assess 3, you
will form teams of 4-5 students.
Think about who your work well
with, a mix of different skills and
types is good.
Choose a
marginalised/disadvantaged
group that you are interested in
working with.
Consider what is it that defines
this group as
marginalised/disadvantaged?
Research some facts about this
group? What are the social
indicators that suggest this group
are disadvantaged/ marginalised?
What are the values of society in
relation to this group?
How might a community
development worker bring about
change for this group?
Report back to the larger group
your findings and discussion
https://profile.id.com.au/
Week 5 What is capacity
building? Building
capacity for
marginalised groups
Ife (2016, chp 10); Kenny
(2011 chp 8); Ingamells
(2010). Onyx & Leonard
(2010)
http://www.foundationhouse.
org.au/wp
content/uploads/2017/11/FO
UNDATION-HOUSE
COMMUNITY
CAPACITY_SCREEN_CO
MB.pdf
p29 for examples, p18 for
approaches
Group Activity;
In your teams you will be looking
at the needs, strengths (capacities)
and dreams of International
students. You will therefore sit
between worlds of “community
development worker” and
“community being developed”.
You can draw on your own
experiences and knowledge in this
activity in order to find solutions
for the needs of your international
student community.
World Café
http://www.theworldcafe.com/key
-concepts-resources/world-cafe
method/
Reflect on the capacities of
International Students. How could

8

you ‘build’ on them through a
project?
Report back your findings to the
larger group.
Week 6 Capacity building for
Aboriginal, Torres Strait
Islander and Refugee
peoples
Ife (2016, chp 4 & 9)
Stephens et.al. (2013);
Campbell& Hunt (2013);
Carey et.al.(2016); Scougall
(2008)
Create the International student
profile:
As a class, do the Head, Heart,
Hands activity which will Asset
map your class.
Look at how could we take
‘What’s wrong, to what’s strong’
Describe the target group –
International students.
MID TRIMESTER BREAK
Week 7 Project development
cycle and strategic
community planning
(for initiating social
action and change)
Ife (2016, chp 13 &14);
Community Tool Box
Toolkit Section 4.
Developing a Framework or
Model of Change, and
section 5. Developing
Strategic and Action Plans
Putting change into action:
Group Discussion
;
What is a project / program?
· Reflect again on the issues/needs
and strengths/assets of your
community of International
students?
Put them on cards.
· Each group brainstorm try
matching the needs / issues to the
assets / strengths.
Each group come up with as many
program ideas as they can, some
creative ways to bring about change
for your community?
· Think about what other
information you might need to
make better choices about your
program ideas?
How would you go about finding
out this information? (ie. Research,
Consultation)

9

What would you do to further
consult and engage with the
International student community?
What websites would you look at?
Use the toolbox and readings from
this week to inform your
discussion.
Toolkits 1-5 on Community Tool
Box
http://ctb.ku.edu/en
and Chapter 3 on Assessing
Community Needs
https://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of
contents/assessment/assessing
community-needs-and-resources
Week 8 Participatory action
research, Community
Consultation and
participation and
Community
Development Strategy
Taylor (2015, Chapter 10)
Ife (2016, chp 6 &10);
Kenny (2016 chp 7);
Frederico & Whiteside
(2015).
Program Proposal idea Pitch
day
As a team discuss some ideas for a
project and each group member
writes their own pitch. Your group
then decides on the best one or two
ideas of how their solution meets
the need.
Each team presents / pitches to the
class (should last max of 5 mins)
The entire class votes on which
teams or ideas are the best and each
team needs to decide on which idea
the group will focus on.
Look at the program template
together.
Week 9 Writing up your plan,
Strategies, Sustainability
and monitoring &
evaluation
Khair, K, M., Lee, K, E., &
Mokhtar, M. (2020).
Team Work; Work on Project
Aim, Outcomes, Strategies and
Monitoring and Evaluation
Week 10 Collaboration and
advocacy work
Budgeting and Funding
Ennis & West (2014); Onyx
et.al. (2010); Lofgren (2011)
Team work: Work on group plan
in your small groups.

10

Week 11 Domestic community
groups and aid
organisations
http://dfat.gov.au/aid/who
we-work
with/ngos/Pages/list-of
australian-accredited-non
government
organisations.aspx
https://www.
vinnies.org.au
http://www.redcross.org.au/t
ogether-as-partners.aspx
Presentations
Week 12 Innovative community
development programs
in public housing
Caniglia & Trotman (2011);
http://www.dhw.wa.gov.au/c
areers
Graduate development
program
Presentations

PRESCRIBED TEXTS
Required Text
Ife, J. (2016). Community development in an uncertain world: Vision, analysis and
practice.
Cambridge University Press.
Readings to Accompany the Lectures
Campbell, D. & Hunt, J. (2013). Achieving broader benefits from Indigenous land use
agreements: community development in Central Australia.
Community Development
Journal, Vol. 48
(2), pp.197-214.
Caniglia, F. & Trotman, A. (2011).
A silver lining community development, crisis and
belonging: exploring the role of community development in Queensland’s recovery
from the January 2011 floods
. Brisbane, Qld.: Under 1 Roof.
Carey, L., Hennequin, C., Krikheli, L., O’Brien, A., Sanchez, E. & Marsden, C. (2016).
Rural Health and Spiritual Care Development: A Review of Programs across Rural
Victoria, Australia.
Journal of Religion and Health, 2016, Vol.55(3), pp.928-940. DOI:
10.1007/s10943-015-0119-1.
Coombes, P., Danaher, P. & Danaher, G. (2013). Transforming Learning through
Capacity-Building: Maximising Life and Learning Support to Mobilise Diversities in
an Australian Pre-Undergraduate Preparatory Program.
The International Journal of
the First Year in Higher Education, Vol. 4
(2). DOI: 10.5204/intjfyhe.v4i2.169.
11
Cortis, N. (2012). Overlooked and under‐served? Promoting service use and
engagement among ‘hard‐to‐reach’ populations.
International Journal of Social
Welfare, Vol.21
(4), pp.351-360. DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-2397.2011.00825.x.
Crawford, B., Yamazaki, R., Franke, E., Amanatidis, S., Ravulo, J., Steinbeck, K.,
Ritchie, J. & Torvaldsen, S. (2014). Sustaining dignity? Food insecurity in homeless
young people in urban Australia.
Health Promotion Journal of Australia, Vol. 25(2),
pp.71-78. DOI: 10.1071/HE13090.
Ennis, G. & West, D. (2014). Community Development and Umbrella Bodies:
Networking for Neighbourhood Change.
British Journal of Social Work, 2014, Vol.
44
(6), pp.1582-1601. DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bct010.
Eversole, R. & Martin, J. (2010). Bridging the Development Gap: Community and
Industry Development in Rural Australia.
Sustaining Regions, Spring 2005, Vol.5(1),
p.19-25.
Frederico, M. & Whiteside, M. (2015). (2015). Building School, Family, and
Community Partnerships: Developing a Theoretical Framework
. Australian Social
Work, 18 August
2015, p.1-16.
Ingamells, A. (2010).
Community development practice: stories, method and meaning.
Altona, Vic.: Common Ground.
Joinking, A. (2003).
Families on the margins strategies for building resilience.
Kensington, N.S.W.: Social Policy Research Centre.
Kaur, J. (2012
). A Review of the Australian research on the needs of culturally and
diverse (CALD) and refugee children and families
. Cultural Diversity & Child
Protection, Kaur, J
. Queensland, Australia, pp. 1-40.
Kenny, S. (2011).
Developing communities for the future. South Melbourne, Vic.:
Cengage Learning.
Keys, N., Bussey, M., Thomsen, D., Lynam, T. & Smith, T. (2014). Building adaptive
capacity in South East Queensland, Australia.
Regional Environmental Change, Apr,
Vol, 14(
2), pp.501-512. DOI: 10.1007/s10113-012-0394-2.
Khair, K, M., Lee, K, E., & Mokhtar, M. (2020). Sustainable City and Community
Empowerment through the Implementation of Community-Based Monitoring: A Conceptual
Approach. file:///Users/felicityoswell/Downloads/sustainability-12-09583-v2.pdf
Lofgren, H. (2011). Health consumer activism in Australia: The downside of state
inclusion.
Health Issues, Issue 107, p.9-10.
Mccormack, J., Watson, H., Harris, C., Potts, J. & Forbes, D. (2013). A hub and spokes
approach to building community capacity for eating disorders in rural Western

12
Australia. Australian Journal of Rural Health, Feb, Vol. 21(1), pp.8-12. DOI:
10.1111/ajr.12007.
Mendes, P.(2008). Integrating Social Work and Community-Development Practice in
Victoria, Australia.
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development, Vol.18(1),
p.14-25. DOI: 10.1080/21650993.2008.9756029.
Mendes, P. & Binns, F. (2013). The integration of community development values,
skills and strategies within rural social work practice in Victoria, Australia.
Community
Development Journal, 2013, Vol. 48
(4), pp.605-622. DOI: 10.1093/cdj/bss065.
Mwanri, L., Hiruy, K. & Masika, J. (2012). Empowerment as a tool for a healthy
resettlement: a case of new African settlers in South Australia. International
Journal of
Migration, Health and Social Care, 2012, Vol.
8(2), p.86-97.
Onyx, J. & Leonard, R. (2010). The Conversion of Social Capital into Community
Development: an Intervention in Australia’s Outback.
International Journal of Urban
and Regional Research, Vol.34
(2), pp.381-397. DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-
2427.2009.00897.x.
Onyx, J., Armitage, L.,Dalton, B., Melville, R., Casey, J., & Banks, R. (2010).
Advocacy with Gloves on: The “Manners” of Strategy Used by Some Third Sector
Organizations Undertaking Advocacy in NSW and Queensland.
Voluntas, Vol.21(1),
pp.41-61.
Sampson, R. C. (2016). Caring, Contributing, Capacity Building: Navigating
Contradictory Narratives of Refugee Settlement in Australia.
Journal of Refugee
Studies, Vol. 29
(1), pp.98-116. DOI: 10.1093/jrs/fev010.
Scerra, N. (2011).
Strengths-based Practice: The Evidence. Social Justice Unit.
Uniting Care Children, Young People and Families, Parramatta, NSW from
http://www.childrenyoungpeopleandfamilies.org.au/info/social_justice/submissions/re
search_papers_and_briefs/?a=62401
Scougall, J. (2008). Lessons learnt about strengthening Indigenous families and
communities
. Canberra: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and
Indigenous Affairs.
Southcombe, A., Cavanagh, J. & Bartram, T. (2015). Capacity building in indigenous
men’s groups and sheds across Australia.
Health Promotion International, Vol. 30(3),
pp.606-615. DOI: 10.1093/heapro/dat092.
Stephens, A., Baird, L.& Tsey, K. (2013). Australian Indigenous community
development: making the link between community development training and
community development practice.
Community Development, 2013, Vol.44(3), p.277-
291.

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Tam, D. M. Y., Coleman, H., & Boey, K. (2012). Professional Suitability for Social
Work Practice.
Research on Social Work Practice, Vol.22(2), pp.227-239.
Taylor, J. (2015).
Working with Communities. South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford
University Press.
Willis, K. (2011).
Theories and Practices of Development (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.
Recommended additional references
Andrina M. (2009). Reflections on working with south Sudanese refugees in settlement
and capacity building in regional Australia
[Chapter 17]. Political practice of
occupational therapy. Churchill Livingstone.
Davies, A. (2009). Understanding Local Leadership in Building the Capacity of Rural
Communities in Australia.
Geographical Research, Vol. 47(4), pp.380-389. DOI:
10.1111/j.1745-5871.2009.00586.x.
Dixon, J, Weeks, W. & Hoatson, L. (2003).
Community practices in Australia. French
Forests, N.S.W.: Pearson SprintPrint.
Ennis, G. & West, D. (2010). Exploring the Potential of Social Network Analysis in
Asset-based Community Development Practice and Research.
Australian Social Work,
2010, Vol.63
(4), p.404-417. DOI: 10.1080/0312407X.2010.508167.
Maidment J. & Egan R. (2016).
Practice skills in social work & welfare: more than just
common sense.
Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
Merke, F., & Pauselli, G. (2013). Foreign Policy and Human Rights Advocacy: An
Exercise in Measurement and Explanation.
Human Rights Review, Vol.14(2), pp.131-
155 [Peer Reviewed Journal]. DOI: 10.1007/s12142-013-0266-2.
Mckenzie, H. (2004). Demographic challenges in non-metropolitan Western Australia:
community development strategies in a neo-liberal economic environment
international.
Acta Structilia: Journal for the Physical and Development Sciences, Dec,
Vol.11(
1), pp.89-118.
NSW Health (2001).
A Framework for Building Capacity to Improve Health, NSW
Health Department, Gladesville, NSW.
Putt, J. & Australian Institute of Criminology (2010).
Community policing in Australia.
Canberra: Australian Institute of criminology.
Smith, J. (2007). Inequalities in non-communicable diseases and effective responses.
Health Promotion Journal of Australia, Apr, Vol. 18(1), pp.20-5.
14
Sonn, C. & Quayle, Amy F.(2013). Developing Praxis: Mobilising Critical Race
Theory in Community Cultural Development.
Journal of Community & Applied Social
Psychology, 2013, Vol.23
(5), pp.435-448. DOI: 10.1002/casp.2145.
Stackpool, G. & Luisi, B. (2011). Building the Capacity of the HIV Sector in Australia:
Taking a Culturally Competent Approach.
HIV Australia, Vol,9(2), p.17-19.
Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency. (2008).
Aboriginal cultural competence
framework
. Melbourne: Victorian Department of Human Services.
Wilson, I. (2010). Building capacity in medical education research in Australia.
The
Medical journal of Australia, 4 January, Vol.192
(1), pp.55-6.
Useful Background Information
Journals
British Journal of Social Work
Journal for the Physical and Development Sciences
Psychological Bulletin
Applied Psychology: An International Review
Community Development Journal
Health Promotion International
The Medical journal of Australia
Australian Social Work
Human Rights Review
Websites
http://ctb.ku.edu/en
http://www.statedevelopment.qld.gov.au/councils-toolbox/step-2-review-communityexpectations-and-vision.html
http://dfat.gov.au/aid/who-we-work-with/ngos/Pages/list-of-australian-accredited-nongovernment-organisations.aspx
http://www.redcross.org.au/together-as-partners.aspx
http://www.dhw.wa.gov.au/careers
http://www.aihw.gov.au/
https://aifs.gov.au/
https://www2.health.vic.gov.au/primary-and-community-health/community-health
Australian Government Department of Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs
http://www.immi.gov.au/tis/how.htm accessed 06/04
15
https://www.communities.qld.gov.au/
https://www.communities.qld.gov.au/gateway/funding-and-grants/human-services-qualityframework/tools-and-resources
https://www.dss.gov.au/our-responsibilities/communities-and-vulnerablepeople/programmes-services
http://www.facs.nsw.gov.au/
https://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/themes/families

Home


Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission: www.hreoc.gov.au
http://www.humanrights.gov.au/links-human-rights-organisations-and-resources
http://www.community.nsw.gov.au/
http://www.powerfulinformation.org/page.cfm?pageid=pi-commdev
http://www.abcdinstitute.org

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Assessment 1: Individual written essay (20%)
Due Date: Week 4
Word Count: 1000 – 1200 words
This assessment is designed to help you develop foundational knowledge of
community development.
The key purpose of Community Development is to build strong communities based on
equality, justice and mutual respect by enabling ordinary people to take part in working
to address the issues that affect their lives and bring about positive change for their
community.
Drawing on the readings from the first few weeks, you are required to discuss:
What is community development?
Why is community development important?
What is the role of Community Development workers in the process?
Also: Choose and research
one (1) of the principles of community development from the list
below:
Provide an outline of your chosen principle.
Find a community development project that applies that principle.
Outline the project and describe how your chosen principle is at work in the
project.
For example; describe
how people are empowered or how they are able to
self determine through this project.
Principles to choose from:
o Capacity building
o Self-determination
o Social justice
o Empowerment
o Collective action
If you wish to choose a principle that is not on the list, please speak with your
lecturer or tutor.
It
must reference books and resources from your weekly readings
You must use APA 7 referencing. Your essay should include at least 5 scholarly
journal articles that you have read, in addition to any textbook references. The format
of your essay will be discussed in greater detail during tutorials. Do NOT utilise sources
such as
www.tutor2u.com and other such web materials as these in no way constitute
academic references for the purpose of your assignments. If you rely on such sources

17
for theoretical support, you will be deemed NOT to have met the requirements of the
assessment
Assessment Criteria
Assessment criteria

Criteria Weighting 100% HD D C P F
Analysis of literature on topic 45%
Use and depth of research 35%
Presentation and referencing
effective and organised essay
structure with correct referencing
of up-to-date resources
20%
TOTAL /20%

18

Criteria for
report
High
Distinction
80% –
Distinction
70%- 79%
Credit
60-69%
Pass
50-59%
Fail
0-49%
Analysis of
literature on
topic
Provides
accurate and
complete
explanation of
the importance
of community
development,
why
community
members are
encouraged to
participate,
draws on most
recent
scholarly
literature
Provides
accurate and
complete
explanation of
community
development,
why
community
members are
encouraged to
participate,
draws on
relevant
literature
Provides
accurate and
complete
explanation of
community
development,
why
community
members are
encouraged to
participate,
draws on
relevant
literature
Provides
explanation of
community
development,
why
community
members are
encouraged to
participate, not
always
accurate
sometimes
incomplete,
sometimes
cites the
relevant
literature.
Provides
explanation of
community
development,
why
community
members are
encouraged to
participate,
research
inaccurate or
incomplete,
does not cite
the relevant
literature.
Use and
depth of
research
A
comprehensive
discussion is
developed.
Summarizes
and shows
insightful
understanding
of the
literature,
including gaps
and/or
limitations of
the research
Utilises
resources from
weekly
readings list as
well as other
outside
resources
A strong
discussion is
developed.
Summarizes
and shows
insightful
understanding
of the
literature,
including
gaps and/or
limitations of
the research
Utilises
resources
from weekly
readings list.
A good
discussion is
developed.
Summarizes
and shows
some
insightful
understanding
of the
literature,
identifies
some
limitations of
the research
Utilises
resources
from weekly
readings list.
Discussion is
fairly well
developed. It
summarizes
the overall
information
obtained from
the literature
and
demonstrates
an adequate
understanding
of knowledge
gained.
Resources
from weekly
reading list
utilised,
however not to
a
comprehensive
extent
Discussion is
not well
developed. It
lacks
summary
and/or any
understanding
of the
relevant
literature
Fails to cite
any
references
from the
weekly
reading list.
Presentation
and
referencing
All levels of
content are
covered in
depth. Wide
range of
contemporary
references and
sources are
well cited
High level of
content is
covered in
depth. Wide
range of good
references
and sources
are well cited
when specific
Appropriate
content is
covered in
reasonable
depth.
Sources are
generally well
cited when
specific
Most major
sections of the
relevant
content
included, but
not covered in
as much depth,
or as explicit,
as expected
Major
sections of
relevant
content have
been omitted
or missed
Inadequate
references
and poor

19

when specific
statements are
made,
Essay is well
structured,
with
introduction,
structured
concise
paragraphs and
a conclusion
statements are
made.
Essay is well
structured,
with easily
identified
introduction,
structured
concise
paragraphs
and a
conclusion
statements are
made
Attempt has
been made to
structure the
essay
correctly.
Generally,
includes an
introduction,
body, and
conclusion.
References
were basic and
some errors of
citation.
Some attempt
at correct
essay
structure, but
not as clear or
well-structured
as expected.
Most sections
included
citation.
Essay
structure is
not at an
acceptable
level.
TOTAL 20%

20
Assessment 2: Individual written essay (30%)
Due Date: Week 8
Word Count: 1200 – 1500 words
This essay allows you to demonstrate your understanding of Capacity building
in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities, and why community
development of this kind is an appropriate approach in these communities.
It also allows you to demonstrate your ability to analyse community
development programs and their impacts in the areas of health, education and
employment amongst disadvantaged and marginalised groups.
Essay question:
For this assessment, you are required to discuss:
In the context of Community Development, what is Capacity Building?
Why is this important when working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Communities?
Briefly outline the current experiences and ongoing impacts of colonisation on the Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander Communities.
Research one (1) Community Development project which focuses on health or
education or employment in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.
Discuss how this project is relevant and supportive to the Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
community.
Along with other resources, please be sure to include suggested references from this unit
outline, and resources from your weekly readings.
You must use APA 7 referencing. Your essay should include at least 5 scholarly
journal articles that you have read, in addition to any textbook references. The format
of your essay will be discussed in greater detail during tutorials. Do NOT utilise sources
such as
www.tutor2u.com and other such web materials as these in no way constitute
academic references for the purpose of your assignments. If you rely on such sources
for theoretical support, you will be deemed NOT to have met the requirements of the
assessment

21

Criteria Weighting 100% HD D C P F
Analysis of literature on topic 45%
Use and depth of research 35%
Presentation and referencing:
effective and organised essay
structure with correct referencing
of up-to-date resources
20%
TOTAL /30%

Assessment criteria

Criteria for
report
High
Distinction
80% –
Distinction
70%- 79%
Credit
60-69%
Pass
50-59%
Fail
0-49%
Provides
accurate and
complete
explanation of
capacity
building in
community
development
and why is it
so important,
draws on most
recent
scholarly
literature
Provides
accurate and
complete
explanation of
capacity
building in
community
development
and why is it
so important,
draws on
relevant
literature
Provides
accurate and
complete
explanation of
capacity
building in
community
development
and why is it
so important,
often cites the
relevant
literature.
Provides
accurate and
complete
explanation of
capacity
building in
community
development
and why is it
so important,
not always
accurate
sometimes
incomplete,
sometimes
cites the
relevant
literature.
Provides
inaccurate
and
incomplete
explanation of
capacity
building in
community
development
and why is it
so important,
does not cite
the relevant
literature.
Use and
depth of
research
A
comprehensive
discussion is
developed.
Summarizes
and shows
insightful
understanding
of the
literature,
including gaps
and/or
limitations of
the research
Utilises
resources from
weekly
readings list as
well as other
outside
resources
A strong
discussion is
developed.
Summarizes
and shows
insightful
understanding
of the
literature,
including
gaps and/or
limitations of
the research
Utilises
resources
from weekly
readings list.
A good
discussion is
developed.
Summarizes
and shows
some
insightful
understanding
of the
literature,
identifies
some
limitations of
the research
Utilises
resources
from weekly
readings list.
Discussion is
fairly well
developed. It
summarizes
the overall
information
obtained from
the literature
and
demonstrates
an adequate
understanding
of knowledge
gained.
Resources
from weekly
reading list
utilised,
however not to
a
comprehensive
extent
Discussion is
not well
developed. It
lacks
summary
and/or any
understanding
of the relevant
literature
Fails to cite
any
references
from the
weekly
reading list.
Presentation
and
referencing
All levels of
content are
covered in
depth. Wide
range of
contemporary
references and
High level of
content is
covered in
depth. Wide
range of good
references
and sources
Appropriate
content is
covered in
reasonable
depth.
Sources are
generally well
Most major
sections of the
relevant
content
included, but
not covered in
as much depth,
Major
sections of
relevant
content have
been omitted
or missed
Inadequate

 

sources are
well cited
when specific
statements are
made,
Essay is well
structured,
with
introduction,
structured
concise
paragraphs and
a conclusion
are well cited
when specific
statements are
made.
Essay is well
structured,
with easily
identified
introduction,
structured
concise
paragraphs
and a
conclusion
cited when
specific
statements are
made
Attempt has
been made to
structure the
essay
correctly.
Generally,
includes an
introduction,
body, and
conclusion.
or as explicit,
as expected
References
were basic and
some errors of
citation.
Some attempt
at correct
essay
structure, but
not as clear or
well-structured
as expected.
Most sections
included
references
and poor
citation.
Essay
structure is
not at an
acceptable
level.
TOTAL 30%

Assessment 3: PROJECT (25%)
Action Plan Proposal and Group Presentation
This assessment builds on your theoretical knowledge and applies that theoretical learning
to a practice situation. The assessment consists of two parts: a) an Individual written
assessment – Action Plan Proposal; and b) a Group Presentation.
Part A: Individual Written Assessment (Action Plan Proposal)
Due Date: Week 11
Word count: 1200-1500 words (25%)
You are required to work in small groups of 3-4 during class tutorials, in order to work towards the
preparation of an Action Plan Proposal for a community development project based on the case study
options listed below (each student will submit an individual proposal). Your submissions will be very
similar to your team members and a high turnitin score not considered. Your group will choose
either Case
Study option 1 or 2.
This is NOT an essay. You must use the provided blank template to complete this task.
The filled in template is an example to guide you on what is required.
Work done in tutorials will inform your proposal with the support of your teacher, but you will also need
to do your own individual out-of-class research to inform your proposal, including researching on capacity
building models and innovative community development programs relevant to the case study. You will
also need to consult the relevant literature and the
community toolbox in order to inform your proposal.
CASE STUDY 1.
International students within Australia in 2022 are experiencing a number of issues related to their tenure
in Australia. These include issues such as homesickness, discrimination, issues with accessing
employment, financial stress, anxiety / depression and others.
The Federal Government has allocated funding for the next 2 years to assist you to address the social
issues and wellbeing of students through a Community Development initiative. Your group is allocated
$10,000 a year.
Within your small group you are to identify an issue or concern important and relevant to international
students. As a group, develop a small program plan to addresses a particular need, concern or interests of
International Students. Using the template, you are to jointly plan the project for the students in your
college or a broader group of international student. EG. Nepalese students in Australia, International
students studying Social work, etc.
CASE STUDY 2.
Many refugees and assylum seekers have exceptional talents and tertiary qualifications in certain areas but
they find barriers in Australia when looking for employment, in accessing health care, education and
affordable housing. Many don’t know where to seek help and have a poor understanding of how to access
health services.
The Federal Government has allocated funding for the next 2 years to assist them in their access to
employment, health or education through a Community Development initiative. Your group is allocated
$10,000 a year.
You need to initially define who is your target group of refugees ie. Sudanese, Afgani, Burmese etc. Do
some research on the particular issues they face and look at past projects. Within your small group you are
to identify an issue or concern important and relevant to refugees or assylum seekers and develop a small
program plan to addresses a particular need or gap. Using the template, you are to jointly plan the project
for them.

You must use APA 7 referencing. Your written individual action plan proposal should each include a few
(scholarly) journal articles or websites that you draw upon for your research in the ‘Target Group’ and
‘Background’ section of the plan.
Work done in tutorials will inform your proposal with the support of your teacher, but you will also
need to do your own individual out-of-class research to inform your proposal, including researching
on capacity building models and innovative community development programs relevant to the case
study. You will also need to consult the relevant literature and the
community toolbox in order to
inform your proposal.
Part B: Group Presentation: (15%)
Due date: Weeks 11 – 12
Timeframe: 13-15 minutes
Each group will present their Community Development project idea / proposal to an NGO panel who will
evaluate your proposal in a role play. The class will play the role of the panel and will give you brief feedback
on your proposal and rate your project from 1-10 (10 being the best).
The best proposal will receive the funding of $10,000 (in theory).
In your presentation, your group will first briefly overview your project and then discuss how you will monitor
and evaluate your project as well as how you propose make your project sustainable after the funding has ceased
in 2 years. Remember, Community Development is not about one-off events, or short-term projects. It is about
strengthening communities, building capacity, addressing social injustice and empowerment.
Your presentation must:

· Outline your project in brief: it’s Aim, Outcomes and proposed Strategies to address needs and concerns –
do not present the program plan. The presentation is an overview and you are describing how this project will
support and address the needs of your target group through it’s activities.
·
·
Outline how you will monitor and evaluate the project
Discuss your ideas on how you can ensure that the project you have designed will continue after the

funding has ceased. How can you engage the participation of the wider community during the project in order
to help sustain the project.
NO NEED TO UPLOAD SLIDES ONTO MOODLE. It actually overloads the system when you try to do that.
Community Development is an innovative and dynamic process. When you’re putting your presentation
together, ‘think out of the box’ and come up with some creative ideas of how you could make sure your project
is engaging, relevant and sustainable.
You must use APA 7 referencing. Your written individual action plan proposal and group
presentation should each include at least 5 (scholarly) journal articles or books each.
The format of your assessment will be discussed in greater detail during tutorials.
Do NOT utilize sources such as
www.tutor2u.com and other such web materials as these
in no way constitute academic references for the purpose of your assignments. If you rely
on such sources for theoretical support, you will be deemed NOT to have met the
requirements of the assessment.

CASE STUDY Program Plan
To be provided during tutorials.
Part A: Assessment Criteria for Individual Action Plan Proposal

Criteria Weighting
100%
HD D C P F
Ability to determine need for the
proposal and apply a rationale for the
Action Plan Proposal
30%
Demonstrated understanding of key
community development principles
required to complete the Action Plan
Proposal
30%
Clear description of the implementation
strategies in the Action Plan Proposal
25%
Presentation of summary and correct
references used
15%
TOTAL /25%

27
Part B: Group Presentation

Criteria for oral presentation Weight
Clarity of concepts and structure 15
Use of Powerpoint presentation and visual resources
Organisation and formatting of visual presentation
Correct referencing used (APA 7)
20
Presentation skills
Engaging and informative
Clear outline of project activities
Beginning, middle and end
Each team member presents
Non-verbal cues
Body posture
Eye contact
20
Topic coverage
Relevant and supportive of target groups issues and concerns
Strengths based
Outcomes – How will people be better off
Connection w each other and community
Thoroughness, accuracy, and depth of analysis
25
Time management and audience engagement
Ability to keep to required presentation timeframe (13-15 mins)
Interaction and ability to retain audience attention.
20
Total /15%

 

Introduction and overview of the project
Discussion of monitoring and evaluation methods
Conclusion and plans for sustainability

28
TUTORIAL PARTICIPATION & ACTIVITIES (10%)
This assessment encourages students to articulate their ideas, build shared
understandings, engage with content, and to contribute to a dynamic learning
environment.

Criteria Areas to be covered Weight
Outstanding
participation
Contributing to whole class discussions
Illustrating high quality of the contributions: to
readings, materials, assessing the key issues, analysing
problems
Demonstrating high level of preparation and skills in
leading discussions
High level of facilitating skills and responding to
peers’ contributions: in small group discussions or
debate
Leading group discussions
10%
Good participation Contributing to good class discussions
Illustrating good quality of the contributions: to
readings, materials, assessing the key issues, analysing
problems
Demonstrating good preparation and skills in leading
discussions
Demonstrate facilitating skills and responding to
peers’ contributions: in small group discussions or
debate
Illustrating some leading group discussions
7%
Satisfactory
participation
Contributing to whole class discussions at times
Illustrating some quality of the contributions: to
readings, materials, assessing the key issues, analysing
problems
Demonstrating some level of preparation and skills in
leading discussions
Demonstrating some level of facilitating skills and
responding to peers’ contributions: in small group
discussions or debate
Illustrating effort in leading group discussions
5%
Poor participation Contribution to whole class discussions is absent
Illustrating minimal quality of the contributions: to
readings, materials, assessing the key issues, analysing
problems
Demonstrating minimal level of preparation and skills
in leading discussions
Demonstrating minimal level of facilitating skills and
lacking responds to peers’ contributions: in small
group discussions or debate
Illustrating minimal effort in leading group
discussions
<2%

29
IMPORTANT NOTES ON PASSING THIS UNIT
Moodle Unit Site
Important information, announcements, learning materials, learning activities and
assessment specifications concerning this unit can also be found on Moodle, accessible via
https://lms.stotts.edu.au/. Ensure to log in on a regular basis and undertake activities
which are set on Moodle. The written assessments will also need to be submitted through
Moodle unless the tutor sets other methods of submission.
Please follow the below link to activate your Moodle account:
1. Type the URL: https://lms.stotts.edu.au/
Username: Student Number
Password: Student Number
For example, your student number is 1037234. To activate your Moodle, you will:
1. Enter your username: 1037234
2. Enter your password: 1037234
Once you log-in, you will be required to reset your password. Please remember your
password, and store it safely.
Student Portal on RTOManager
RTOManager is your student portal. All enrolment details, fee records, attendance and
results will be updated through RTOManager.
Please follow the below instructions to activate your RTOManager account:
1. Type the URL: https://ae.rtomanager.com.au/
2. Username: Student Number
3. Password: (will be emailed to you when your account has been setup,
normally one week after your enrolment).

30
Once you log in, please click the Profile section, and update your details accordingly, i.e.
address, email, phone number, etc.
(As part of your enrolment requirements, it is mandatory for students to provide your
most up-to-date details in the system.)
You may also click on “Change Password” and reset the password provided to you. Please
ensure that you do not share your login details with others.
Email Communication
Emails to the educators must be sent from the Stott’s student email account and vice versa.
If students access their emails through a provider other than Stott’s, it is the student’s
responsibility to ensure that Stott’s emails are forwarded to the student’s private email
address. Stott’s will use email communications as primary means of communicating
important enrolment and study information to students.
Course Progress
Students should become familiar with the academic policies and procedures regarding
course progress as found on
https://ae.rtomanager.com.au/Publics/PublicsPages/DocView.aspx
To demonstrate satisfactory course progress, a student will need to achieve at least a
“Pass” result in at least 50% of units undertaken in each trimester. Where applicable, the
student must at all times be capable of completing the course within the expected duration
as specified on the Confirmation of Enrolment (CoE).

31
If the student fails to demonstrate this, they will be identified as a student who is “at-risk”
of failing to complete their course within the expected duration. In order to avoid this and
to ensure that the student’s study will improve in the subsequent trimester, the student
will be required to attend an intervention meeting with the Academic Support Officer (or
the relevant Stott’s College representative) to discuss their study needs and appropriate
study support strategies. It is crucial that the student attends this meeting to avoid further
actions being taken by the College that might seriously affect the student’s enrolment
status.
If the student is unable to attend this meeting due to compassionate or compelling
circumstances outside of the student’s control, the student will need to e-mail the
Academic Support Officer (or Stott’s College representative) to organise an alternative
meeting.
Individual and Group Assessments
All assessments will have clear guidelines on whether they must be completed individually
or as a formal group assessment. While group discussion is encouraged, the final
submission for an individual written assessment must be the student’s original work. All
collaboration and assistance received
must be clearly acknowledged. See below for
information on Plagiarism and other forms of Academic Misconduct.
Assignment Extension of Due Dates
All written assessments must be submitted on Moodle by the due date and time the
assessment is due. Written assessments should be submitted with the Assessment Cover
Sheet and follow the Written Assessment Formatting Guidelines available on Moodle.
Emails and hard copies will not be considered a submission. A duplicate copy of all work
submitted must be kept by the student.
Permission to make a late submission of an assignment must be obtained from the tutor.
Extension requests for up to 7 days must be submitted in writing to the tutor
before the
assessment due date
. Having ‘work in other units’ will not be accepted as reasonable
grounds for granting an extension. Additionally, excuses involving computers or printers
will not be accepted as valid reasons for late submission. It is the student’s responsibility
to organise their assessments so that all required work is submitted by the due date.
Where the student’s work is submitted after the due date and compassionate or
compelling grounds cannot be established, there will be a penalty of 5% of the total weight
of the assessment for
each day (including public holidays and weekends) the submission
is overdue. Late submissions will only be allowed up to 14 days after the original due date
(minus the period for an approved extension, where applicable).

Due Date Length of
Extension
Form Approval
Before Due Date Up to a maximum of
7 days
In writing, such as through an e
mail
Tutor
Before Due Date More than 7 days Application for Special
Consideration Form (Student
Portal)
Course
Coordinator

32

After Due Date Application for Special
Consideration Form (Student
Portal) Must be submitted
within three days of the due
date
Course
Coordinator

Absence during Presentations, Exams and Invigilated Tests
If the student is requesting for an extension that is longer than 7 days or unable to complete
an assessment (including a presentation or test) due to
compassionate or compelling
circumstances
, the student must complete and submit the Application for Special
Consideration Form to the Course Coordinator
within three days of the assessment due
date.
Appropriate evidence and documentation must also be supplied to support the claim.
Minor illnesses (such as headaches, colds and minor gastric upsets) and excuses such as
timetable confusion or forgetfulness are not considered to be valid reasons for special
consideration. The form is available on the Student Portal.
A deferred or a supplementary examination or online test may be administered as
scheduled by the Department. Students will only be granted one opportunity to take a
deferred test.
For students with life circumstances or personal limitations that may affect their course of
study, it is recommended that they contact the Dean or Course Coordinator as soon as
possible.
Plagiarism and Academic Misconduct
Plagiarism and academic misconduct
Stott’s College aims to produce graduates with attributes of honesty, integrity and ethical
behaviour. Stott’s College expects students to strive for the best results they can from their
own efforts and to gain results that reflect their achievements. It is expected that students
will avoid behaviours that are dishonest such as contract cheating, plagiarism and
collusion. It is your responsibility to learn the conventions and become familiar with the
policy and procedures relating to academic misconduct.
Contract Cheating
Occurs when a student submits work that has been completed for them by a third party,
irrespective of the third party’s relationship with the student, and whether they are paid
or unpaid (Harper & Bretag et al 2018).
The consequences and more information can be found in Stott’s College’s Academic
Misconduct policy and procedure at
https://ae.rtomanager.com.au/
33
Results or Grade Review
If the student would like to request a review of their assessment results, the student must
fill and submit the Application for Review or Remark of Assessment Form (Student Portal
on RTOManager)
within 20 working days to the Course Coordinator or delegate. Reviews
after this date will not be heard. There will be a charge associated with this application,
and any changes made to the results will override the original results and be final.
Student Support
The lecturers and tutors will be able to assist the student regarding unit specific questions
or assessment queries. In addition to this, there are a variety of other academic and nonacademic support services available to assist students in their study ranging from how to
analyse assignment questions, researching for background reading, structuring answers to
rewriting skills and citing and referencing correctly. Please contact your Academic Support
Officer in your campus or program for more details. There will also be workshops on library
and study skills available throughout the trimester for all students. These workshops are
extremely useful for study and they can help students obtain excellent academic outcomes.

34
Assessment Grades

Code Grade
(Nomenclature)
Mark Information
HD High Distinction 80-
100
Outstanding comprehension and
demonstration of Unit Learning
Outcomes
D Distinction 70-79 Excellent comprehension and
demonstration of Unit Learning
Outcomes
C Credit 60-69 Sound comprehension and
demonstration of Unit Learning
Outcomes
P Pass 50-59 Satisfactory comprehension and
demonstration of Unit Learning
Outcomes
PSA Pass
Supplementary
Assessment
50 Awarded a Pass after successfully
passing a supplementary assessment
N Fail Below
50%
Fails to achieve Satisfactory
comprehension and demonstration of
Unit Learning Outcomes
R Resit 45-49 Interim grade pending result of
supplementary assessment. Success in
the supplementary assessment will result
in a PSA. If resulting in unsuccessful
result, N.
IMPORTANT: Only students who
have attempted all assessment tasks in
the unit may be eligible for a
supplementary assessment.
ND Deferred Result Interim grade pending result of a
deferred exam
DNS Did Not Sit Exam 0-60 Completed some assessments of the unit
but did not attempt final exam
DNA Did Not Attempt
Unit
0 Enrolled in unit, did not withdraw but did
not attempt any unit assessments
Q Did Not Make
Terms
0-100 Failed unit for any other reason
W Withheld Result Results withheld for non-payment of
fees, outstanding library books other
administrative reasons
CT Credit Transfer Unit previously completed at another
Higher Education Provider and deemed
equivalent
RPL Recognition of Prior
Learning
Awarding of credit for unit
other than Credit Transfer, i.e.
completion of lower AQF level
course and subsequent credit
exemptions

35
Version Control

Version 1, 20201222
Study
Period
Trimester 2-2022
Reviewer Tertiary Program Manager & Director of Curriculum
Note to Educator/Trainer: The layout and structure of this document must not be
changed. Any changes you make to the contents must be reported to the Head of
Discipline before each study period. These changes will be recorded.
Date of
Review
30.04.2022

Document Change and Review log
Provide details of changes made to the document and the rationale for the changes, including
student feedback, continuous improvement, or as part of quality assurance review

Date Version By Notes
30.01.2021 1, 20201222 KS Update to APA 7 referencing
Update to references to assessments/marking to
be directed to Tutors
Inclusion of Assessment 3B timeframe, criteria and
rubric