Business and Management

ATHE Level 4
Qualifications in
Business and Management
ATHE Level 4 Diploma in Business and Management
ATHE Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management
ATHE Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management (Gen Ed)

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Contents
Contents……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………1
Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….3
About ATHE ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3
Our Qualifications……………………………………………………………………………………………………….3
Support for Centres…………………………………………………………………………………………………….4
ATHE Qualifications at Level 4 in this Specification…………………………………………………………5
Introduction to ATHE’s Level 4 Qualifications in Business and Management ………………………6
The Aims of the Qualifications ……………………………………………………………………………………..6
Entry Requirements for Level 4 Business and Management …………………………………………….7
Reasonable Adjustments and Special Considerations……………………………………………………..8
Support and Recognition……………………………………………………………………………………………..8
National Occupational Standards………………………………………………………………………………….8
Progression from Level 4 Business and Management……………………………………………………..8
ATHE Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)…………………………………………………………………….8
Resources Required by Centres …………………………………………………………………………………..8
Modes of Delivery ………………………………………………………………………………………………………9
Definition of Guided Learning Hours (GLH), Total Qualification Time (TQT) and Credit………10
Qualification Structures for ATHE Level 4 Business and Management……………………………..12
ATHE Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management……………………………………..12
ATHE Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management (Gen Ed) ……………………….13
General Education (Gen Ed) Core Requirements:…………………………………………………………13
ATHE Level 4 Diploma in Business and Management……………………………………………………15
Guidance on Assessment and Grading………………………………………………………………………..16
Methods of Assessment…………………………………………………………………………………………….17
Recording Assessment Judgements……………………………………………………………………………17
Putting an Assessment Strategy in Place …………………………………………………………………….17
Qualification Grading Structure …………………………………………………………………………………..18
Quality Assurance of Centres …………………………………………………………………………………….18
Malpractice………………………………………………………………………………………………………………19
Guidance for Teaching and Learning…………………………………………………………………………..19
Top Tips for Delivery…………………………………………………………………………………………………19
Unit Specifications…………………………………………………………………………………………………….20
The Business Environment ………………………………………………………………………………………..21
People in Organisations…………………………………………………………………………………………….25
Financial and Management Accounting Techniques for Managers…………………………………..30
Communication Skills for Business ……………………………………………………………………………..34
Resource Management……………………………………………………………………………………………..39

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The Marketing Mix…………………………………………………………………………………………………….44
Corporate Social Responsibility ………………………………………………………………………………….49
Managing a Work-Based Team Project ……………………………………………………………………….53
Entrepreneurship………………………………………………………………………………………………………57
Customer Relationship Management…………………………………………………………………………..60
Administrative Services……………………………………………………………………………………………..65
Managing Information and Knowledge…………………………………………………………………………69
Managing Operations………………………………………………………………………………………………..72
Managing Quality ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..76
Digital Communications …………………………………………………………………………………………….80
Cultural Perspectives ………………………………………………………………………………………………..83
Applied Statistics………………………………………………………………………………………………………85

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Introduction
About ATHE
Awards for Training and Higher Education (ATHE) is a global awarding organisation regulated by
Ofqual and other United Kingdom and international regulators. We provide centres with a wide variety
of qualifications including, but not limited to; business and management, administrative management,
law, computing, health and social care and religious studies. ATHE has also developed a range of
bespoke qualifications for clients.
The ATHE mission is to provide outstanding qualifications, customer service and support, enabling
centres to thrive and their learners to achieve and progress. We will support this mission by:
providing qualifications which enable learners to fulfil their potential and make a positive
contribution to society both socially and economically
delivering the highest standards of customer service
delivering support and guidance which meet the needs of all centres and enable them to
improve performance
upholding and maintaining the quality and standards of qualifications and assessments
having a commitment to lifelong learning and development
Our Qualifications
Our qualifications have been created with the involvement of expert input from managers and staff
in colleges, industry professionals and our qualification development team. We have also taken
into account feedback from learners and consulted with higher education institutions to ensure the
qualifications facilitate progression to higher levels. We have taken advantage of the flexibility of
the RQF to develop a suite of awards, certificates and diplomas that offer progression from level 3
up to level 7.
Key features of the qualifications include:
regular reviews of the units and the associated support materials so they are current and
meet the needs of learners
alignment of the programmes of learning to degree and higher degree qualifications in HEIs
in the UK and international institutions, so there is comparability and smooth progression
for learners
core units that are common to different sectors offering the opportunity for learners to move
between sectors or delay decisions on particular specialisms
optional units offering the opportunity for learners to choose specialist units which best
match their job, interests and progression aspirations.
small qualifications that can be used for professional development for those in employment
or for learners who do not have the time to undertake a full time programme
challenging and relevant learning with flexible methods of assessment allowing tutors to
select the most appropriate methods for their learners opportunities for learners to achieve
higher grades by unit and overall qualification and reach their maximum potential
learning that develops knowledge, understanding and skills e.g. problem solving and
interpersonal skills needed by effective managers.

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Support for Centres
We are committed to supporting our centres and offer a range of training, support and consultancy
services including:
a comprehensive guide for centres on delivering ATHE qualifications
qualification guidance, assessor guidance, suggested resources and sample assignments
for all units which have been written and verified by experienced practitioners
verification and guidance with all internally devised assignments
guidance on how to deliver, assess and quality assure the qualifications
an ATHE centre support officer who guides centres through the recognition process,
learner registration and learner results submission
health check visits to highlight areas of good practice and any areas for development
an allocated member of our team who can work with centres to support further
improvements in the quality of teaching, learning and assessment
the services of a team of experienced external verifiers
opportunities for training and staff development
access to free webinars to support delivery, assessment and QA processes
support for business development.
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ATHE Qualifications at Level 4 in this Specification
This document provides key information on ATHE’s suite of Level 4 qualifications in Business and
Management, including the rules of combination, the content of all the units and guidance on
assessment and curriculum planning. It should be used in conjunction with the ATHE handbook
“Delivering ATHE Qualifications”. Further guidance and supporting documentation on curriculum
planning, internal verification and assessment are provided separately in the Delivering ATHE
Qualifications Guide and via the ATHE website.
These qualifications have been accredited to the Regulated Qualifications Framework. Each
qualification has a Qualification Accreditation Number (QAN). This number will appear on the
learner’s final certification documentation. Each unit within a qualification also has a RQF code.
The QAN numbers for these qualifications are as follows
:

ATHE Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management 603/3339/X
ATHE Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management (Gen Ed) 603/3339/X
ATHE Level 4 Diploma in Business and Management 603/3345/5

Accreditation Dates
These qualifications are accredited from 1 July 2018 which is their operational start date in centres.
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Introduction to ATHE’s Level 4 Qualifications in Business and Management
The Aims of the Qualifications
The aims of these qualifications are to develop knowledge and understanding in a range of subject
areas which are pertinent to the development of participants and to junior management roles in
organisations. The qualifications also support progression for learners to higher qualification levels.
The associated sample assignments also support the development of skills needed by individuals
working with others and carrying levels of responsibility.
The Level 4 Business and Management qualifications have been developed to conform to the
requirements of the RQF.
These qualifications are therefore designed to provide:
maximum flexibility with different sized level 4 qualifications for those who only wish or have
the time to initially take smaller qualifications and then build up larger extended
qualifications over time
opportunities for learners to develop a breadth of knowledge and understanding of subject
matter related to business and management
development of underpinning skills, personal qualities and attitudes essential for successful
performance in working life
optional units in particular specialisms that are directly related to learners’ current
responsibilities or that meet a particular interest and support career development
a base for continued learning and a desire to constantly develop as an individual, further
improving knowledge, understanding and skills.

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Entry Requirements for Level 4 Business and Management
These qualifications are designed for learners who are typically aged 18 and above.
ATHE’s policy regarding access to our qualifications is that:
they should be available to everyone who is capable of reaching the required standards
they should be free from any barriers that restrict access and progression
there should be equal opportunities for all those wishing to access the qualifications
Centres should review the prior qualifications and experience of each learner and consider whether
they provide the necessary foundations to undertake the programme of study at level 4. For
learners with disabilities and other specific needs, this review will need to take account of the
support available to the learner during teaching and assessment of the qualification. If there are
exceptional entrants, centres should contact ATHE.

For learners who have recently been in education or training the entry profile is likely to include
one of following:
a GCE Advanced level profile with achievement in 2 or more subjects supported by
5 or more GCSEs at grades C and above
other related level 3 subjects such as ATHE level 3 Diplomas
an Access to Higher Education Certificate delivered by an approved further
education institute and validated by an Access Validating Agency
other equivalent international qualifications
Learners must also have an appropriate standard of English to enable them to access relevant
resources and complete the unit assignments.
Mature learners may present a more varied profile of achievement that is likely to include
relevant work experience (paid and/or unpaid) with levels of responsibility, participation and/or
achievement of relevant professional qualifications. This may be used for recognition of prior
learning (RPL). Learners may also hold RQF qualifications which will enable them to claim an
exemption from part of the qualification.

Please note that UK Visas and Immigration Department (UKVI) requires adult students to have
acceptable English language ability before they can apply to become an adult student under Tier 4
(General) of the points-based system. As an education provider you must ensure that the applicant
is competent in the English language where the programme is taught and assessed in English.
This should be at IELTS 5.5 at a minimum of CEFR level B2 for a RQF qualification at level 4.
Centres are required to recruit learners to qualifications with integrity. Centres must carry out
robust initial assessment to ensure that learners, who undertake qualifications have the necessary
background knowledge, understanding and skills to undertake the learning and assessment at
level 4. This assessment should take account of any support available to the learner within the
centre during the programme of study and any support that may be required to allow the learner to
access the assessment for the units within the qualification.
ATHE will review centre recruitment policies as part of the monitoring processes.

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Reasonable Adjustments and Special Considerations
ATHE’s policy on reasonable adjustments and special consideration aims to enhance access to the
qualifications for learners with disabilities and other difficulties (as defined by the Equality Act 2010)
without compromising the assessment of skills, knowledge and understanding. Centres are also
required to have their own policies for reasonable adjustments and special considerations. Where
the learner has been awarded a reasonable adjustment or special consideration this must be
recorded on the assessment sheet and the learner record. External Verifiers will take account of
this information at the external verification of learner work. Further details on reasonable
adjustments and special considerations are provided in the ATHE policy document, which can be
found on our website. Please contact ATHE if you are uncertain about adjustments for certain
learners.
Support and Recognition
These qualifications have been developed with the involvement of expert input from managers and
staff in colleges currently delivering qualifications at this level or planning to do so, Higher Education
Institutes, industry professionals and our qualification development team. We have also taken into
account feedback from learners.
National Occupational Standards
The ATHE Level 4 qualifications in Business and Management provide much of the underpinning
knowledge and understanding for the National Occupational Standards in Management and
Leadership.
Progression from Level 4 Business and Management
On successful completion of a Level 4 qualification in Business and Management there are a
number of progression opportunities.
Learners may progress to:
employment or have increased opportunities for progression in their current role
larger qualifications at the same level e.g. from a Diploma to the Extended Diploma in
Business and Management or to the Extended Diploma in Management for Health and
Social Care
a level 5 ATHE qualification such as the ATHE Level 5 Extended Diploma in Business
and Management or the ATHE Level 5 Extended Diploma in Management for Health
and Social Care or the ATHE Level 5 Extended Diploma in Business Administration
a level 5 (Gen Ed) route on successful completion of the required units at level 4 (see
page 13). Completion of the Mandatory units listed, will ensure learners have acquired
the first level of study for meeting the General Education (Gen Ed) Core requirements.
the second year of degree programmes at some universities (see Progression Routes
on the ATHE website).
ATHE Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)
There will be occasions where learners wish to claim recognition of prior learning that has not been
formally assessed and accredited. ATHE has provided detailed guidance on RPL which is available for
centres on the ATHE website and centres may also contact ATHE directly to obtain further clarification
or discuss the requirements for RPL.
Resources Required by Centres
ATHE expects centres to provide the right human and physical resources needed to ensure the quality
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of the learner experience. Centres must ensure that staff have the appropriate level of subject
knowledge and are normally qualified to at least a degree standard. It is desirable that staff have a
teaching and/or assessing qualification and practical experience of business or management.
The physical resources required will vary depending on the style of delivery. Where distance or
blended learning is used, ATHE expects centres to have appropriate learning support materials,
infrastructure and technology in place to meet student needs.
This information will be checked by external verifiers on their visits to centres.
Modes of Delivery
Subject to checks by external verifiers centres are able to deliver this qualification using the following
modes of delivery, in order to meet the needs of their learners. This can include:
Full –time
Part-time
Blended learning
Distance learning
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Definition of Guided Learning Hours (GLH), Total Qualification Time (TQT) and Credit
Values for Total Qualification Time, Guided Learning Hours and Credit, are calculated by considering
the different activities that a learner would typically complete in order to achieve the learning outcomes
of a qualification at the standards provided.
The needs of individual learners and the differing teaching styles used mean there will be variation in
the actual time taken to complete a qualification.
Values for Total Qualification Time, Guided Learning Hours and Credit are estimates.
Guided Learning Hours (GLH)
The term Guided Learning Hours (GLH) is an estimate of the amount of time, on average, that a
lecturer, supervisor, tutor or other appropriate provider of education or training,
will immediately
guide or supervise
the learner to complete the learning outcomes of a unit to the appropriate
standard.
GLH are intended to provide guidance for centres on the amount of time required to deliver the
programme and support learners. GLH are made up of activities completed by the learner
under
immediate guidance or supervision
of a lecturer, supervisor, tutor or other appropriate provider of
education or training. Whether through actual attendance or via electronic means, the activity must be
in real time.
Some examples of activities that can contribute to Guided Learning Hours include:
Supervised induction sessions
Learner feedback with a teacher in real time
Supervised independent learning
Classroom-based learning supervised by a teacher
Work-based learning supervised by a teacher
Live webinar or telephone tutorial with a teacher in real time
E-learning supervised by a teacher in real time
All forms of assessment that take place under the immediate guidance or supervision of a
lecturer, supervisor, tutor or other appropriate provider of education or training, including
where the assessment is competence-based and may be turned into a learning
opportunity.
Total Qualification Time (TQT)
Total Qualification Time (TQT) is a guide to the amount of time a learner would take, on average, to
complete the different activities to demonstrate achievement of the learning outcomes of a whole
qualification at the standards provided.
TQT includes all the activities described under guided learning hours (GLH) plus an estimate of the
number of hours a learner will be likely to spend in completing other work,
which is directed by the
tutor. This could include preparation, study or any form of participation in education or training,
including assessment, but unlike Guided Learning this is
not under the immediate guidance or
supervision
of a lecturer, supervisor, tutor or other appropriate provider of education or training.
Some examples of tutor directed activities that can contribute to Total Qualification Time, include:
Preparation
– Preparation for classes

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– Preparation for assignments
Study
– Independent research/learning
– Background reading
– Compilation of a portfolio of work experience
– E-learning
– Drafting coursework or assignments
– Working in student teams
– Watching a pre-recorded podcast or webinar
– Work-based learning
Credit
The credit value specifies the number of credits that will be awarded to a learner who has achieved the
learning outcomes of a unit at the specified standard.
Each credit represents 10 hours of learning time and equates to 10 hours of total qualification time.
Therefore, one 15 credit unit represents 150 hours of total qualification time. Learning time is a
notional measure which indicates the amount of time a learner at the level of the unit is expected to
take, on average, to complete the learning outcomes of the unit to the standard determined by the
assessment criteria.
Learning time includes all the activities described under guided learning hours and additional learning.
The credit value of the unit will remain constant in all contexts regardless of the assessment method or
the mode of delivery. Learners will only be awarded credits for the successful completion of whole
units.
The level is an indication of relative demand, complexity and depth of achievement and autonomy.
Each qualification has agreed rules of combination which indicates the number of credits to be
achieved, the units that are mandatory and the choice of optional units. The rules of combination for
the unendorsed qualifications and the pathway specific qualifications are given below.

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Qualification Structures for ATHE Level 4 Business and Management
ATHE Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management
To obtain the Extended Diploma in Business and Management learners must achieve the Mandatory
Units PLUS four Optional Units
The Total Qualification Time is 1200
The Total Guided Learning Hours is 480
The Total Credit value is 120

Unit Title Level Credit GLH

Mandatory Units

The Business Environment 4 15 60
People in Organisations 4 15 60
Financial and Management Accounting Techniques
for Managers
4 15 60
Communication Skills for Business 4 15 60
Optional Units
Resource Management 4 15 60
The Marketing Mix 4 15 60
Corporate Social Responsibility 4 15 60
Managing a Work-Based Team Project 4 15 60
Entrepreneurship 4 15 60
Customer Relationship Management 4 15 60
Administrative Services 4 15 60
Managing Information and Knowledge 4 15 60
Managing Operations 4 15 60
Managing Quality 4 15 60

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ATHE Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management (Gen Ed)
Learners wishing to ultimately progress* to the final year of a degree programme from an American
university must achieve the Mandatory units listed below.
The Total Qualification Time is 1650
The Total Guided Learning Hours is 660
The Total Credit value is 165

Unit Title Level Credit GLH

Mandatory Units

The Business Environment 4 15 60
People in Organisations 4 15 60
Financial and Management Accounting Techniques
for Managers
4 15 60
Communication Skills for Business 4 15 60
Managing a Work-Based Team Project 4 15 60
Resource Management 4 15 60
Corporate Social Responsibility 4 15 60
The Marketing Mix 4 15 60
Digital Communications 4 15 60
Cultural Perspectives 4 15 60
Applied Statistics 4 15 60

General Education (Gen Ed) Core Requirements:
The Mandatory units listed above meet the General Education Core Requirements and fulfil the
necessary credits at Level 4 to enable learners to progress to the next level and ultimately to the final
year of a degree from an American university.

Level 4 (Gen Ed) Units Gen Ed Core Requirement
Digital Communications Technology (TN)
Cultural Perspectives Human Civilization (HC)
Applied Statistics Mathematics (MA)

In addition to achieving the above Gen Ed units, achievement of the Mandatory Unit ‘Communication
Skills for Business’ will meet the General Education Core Requirement ‘Basic Communication (BC).
Communication is also embedded throughout the other Business and Management units and this
further develops the knowledge and skill required for progression.
*For progression to the final major requirements of an American degree, learners should achieve the
ATHE Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management (Gen Ed) before progressing to the
Level 5 Extended Diploma in Business and Management (Gen Ed) and thereafter the ATHE Level 6

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Extended Diploma in Management (Gen Ed). This will ensure that all seven General Education Core
Requirements are met and the total credits necessary across Levels 4-6 are fulfilled.
The breadth of study in this programme will enable learners to become more rounded individuals,
and this will facilitate personal development and career progression to management roles. The
programme will provide a base for continued learning and a desire to constantly develop as an
individual, further improving knowledge, understanding and skills.

ATHE Level 4 Diploma in Business and Management
Learners must achieve the Mandatory Units PLUS two Optional Units
The Total Qualification Time is 600
The Total Guided Learning Hours is 240
The Total Credit value is 60

Unit Title Level Credit GLH

Mandatory units

The Business Environment 4 15 60
People in Organisations 4 15 60

Optional Units

Communication Skills for Business 4 15 60
Resource Management 4 15 60
The Marketing Mix 4 15 60
Corporate Social Responsibility 4 15 60
Managing a Work Based Team Project 4 15 60
Entrepreneurship 4 15 60
Customer Relationship Management 4 15 60
Administrative Services 4 15 60
Financial and Management Accounting
Techniques for Managers
4 15 60
Managing Information and Knowledge 4 15 60
Managing Operations 4 15 60
Managing Quality 4 15 60
Digital Communications 4 15 60

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Guidance on Assessment and Grading
The assessment of the Level 4 Business and Management qualification is completed through the
submission of internally assessed learner work. To achieve a pass for a unit, a learner must have
successfully achieved the learning outcomes at the pass standard set by the assessment criteria for that
unit. To achieve merit or distinction, the learner must demonstrate that they have achieved the criteria set
for these grades. Learners cannot omit completing work to meet the pass standard and simply work to the
higher grades, as this would put a pass for the unit in jeopardy. Similarly, learners cannot complete work
to meet the criteria for distinction in the anticipation that this will also meet the criteria for merit. However,
where work for the pass standard is marginal, assessors can take into account any extension work
completed as this may support achievement of the pass standard.
ATHE will provide a sample assignment for each unit which can be used as the assessment for the unit.
These assignments have extension activities, which enable the learners to provide additional evidence to
show that the criteria for the higher grades have been met. The assessor therefore must judge the grade
for the work submitted on the basis of whether the LO has been met at the standard, specified for the
pass, merit or distinction grade for that LO. In making their judgements assessors will continue to check
whether the command verbs stated in the AC have been delivered. There is no requirement for learners to
produce the additional work required for the higher grades and the tutor may advise the learner to work to
the pass standard, where this is appropriate.
The assessor should record their judgements on the ATHE template, stating what grade the learner has
achieved and providing evidence for the judgements. The internal verifier can also use the ATHE IV
template but the feedback to the assessor must show whether the assessor has made valid judgements
for all the learner work, including any extension activities which have been completed. Assessment
judgements always require care to ensure that they are reliable and that there is sufficient and specific
feedback to the learner to show whether he or she has demonstrated achievement of the LO at the
specified standard. The additional grades mean that assessors must take even greater care to assure the
validity of their judgements. They must provide specific feedback to learners, on whether the additional
evidence provided has or has not met the standard for merit and distinction grades. Assessment is
therefore more complex.
We would encourage our centres to develop their own assessment strategies so you have the opportunity
to put assignments in a context that is appropriate for your learners. Any assignments that you devise
independently will need to be submitted to ATHE for approval before delivery of the programme. Centres
can submit assignments for approval using the ‘Centre-Devised Assignment’ template documentation
available on the ATHE website.
An assignment can relate to a single unit or an integrated assignment, incorporating more than one unit.
An integrated assignment must show which learning outcomes and assessment criteria from which units
are being covered.

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Methods of Assessment
ATHE encourages centres to use a range of assessment vehicles that will engage learners and give them
an opportunity to both demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of a topic and to evaluate how
they might apply that knowledge in a given context. This should be part of the assessment strategy.
We would recommend avoiding essay writing and that more varied types of assessment are included. This
might include assessment through:
a research activity resulting in the compilation of a report
an academic paper or article for publication
the compilation of a case study
a critical review and evaluation of a chosen company’s policies, procedures and systems
a set project completed for an employer (also known as an ‘employer-engagement’ activity)
the production of a portfolio of evidence relating to a particular unit.
This list is by no means exhaustive but gives examples of some creative assessment methods that could
be adopted.
Recording Assessment Judgements
Assessors are required to record assessment judgements for each student by unit. ATHE has provided a
template for centres to use to record their judgements and this form should be used. The form enables
the centre to record any adjustments due to special considerations or reasonable adjustments. Any
adjustments following appeals should also be recorded. These records must be retained as they will be
checked at external verification visits. All learner work must be retained for a minimum of 4 years after
certification has taken place.
Putting an Assessment Strategy in Place
You will need to demonstrate to your External Verifier that you have a clear assessment strategy
supported by robust quality assurance in order to meet the ATHE requirements for registering learners
for a qualification. In devising your assessment strategy, you will need to ensure that:
centre devised assignments are clearly mapped to the unit learning outcomes and
assessment criteria they have been designed to meet.
the command verbs used in the assignment are appropriate for the level of the qualification,
e.g. analyse, evaluate, synthesise.
the assignment gives the learner sufficient opportunity to meet the assessment criteria at
the right level, through the work they are asked to complete (The RQF level descriptors will
be helpful to you in determining the level of content of the assessment).
students are well-briefed on the requirements of the unit and what they have to do to meet
them.
assessors are well trained and familiar with the content of the unit/s they are assessing.
there is an internal verification process in place to ensure consistency and standardisation
of assessment across the qualification.
assessment decisions are clearly explained and justified through the provision of feedback
to the learner.
work submitted can be authenticated as the learner’s own work and that there is clear
guidance and implementation of the centre’s Malpractice Policy.
there is an assessment plan in place identifying dates for summative assessment of each
unit and indicating when external verification will be needed.
sufficient time is included in the assessment planning to allow the learners time for any
necessary remedial work that may be needed prior to certification.

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Qualification Grading Structure
Assessment is completed on the basis of achievement of the Learning Outcome at the standards set by
the Assessment Criteria in each unit and the learner can achieve a pass, merit or distinction. The units
are equally weighted. As well as receiving a grade for each individual unit, learners will receive an overall
grade for the qualification. The calculation of the overall qualification grade is based on the student’s
performance in all units and the points gained from all credits required for the Diploma or Extended
Diplomas. The learner must have attempted the valid combination of units. The formula for establishing
the overall grade is as follows.
Points for each 15 credit unit achieved are:
Pass – 40 points
Merit – 53 points
Distinction – 66 points
Calculations for the overall qualification grade:
Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management (With Gen Ed) (165 credits)
Pass 396 – 527
Merit 528 – 659
Distinction 660 +
Level 4 Extended Diploma in Business and Management (120 credits)
Pass 288 – 383
Merit 384 – 479
Distinction 480 +
Level 4 Diploma in Business and Management (60 credits)
Pass 144 – 191
Merit 192 – 239
Distinction 240+
Quality Assurance of Centres
Centres delivering ATHE qualifications must be committed to ensuring the quality of teaching and learning
so that the learner experience is assured. Quality assurance will include a range of processes as
determined by the centre and this could include, gathering learner feedback, lesson observation, analysis
of qualitative and quantitative date etc. There must also be effective standardisation of assessors and
verification of assessor decisions. ATHE will rigorously monitor the application of quality assurance
processes in centres.
ATHE’s quality assurance processes will involve:
Centre approval for those centres which are not already recognised to deliver ATHE RQF
qualifications
Monitoring visits to ensure the centre continues to work to the required standards
External verification of learner work
Centres will be required to undertake training, internal verification and standardisation activities as agreed
with ATHE. Details of ATHE’s quality assurance processes are provided in the ATHE Guide: “Delivering
ATHE Qualifications” which is available on our website.

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Malpractice
Centres must have a robust Malpractice Policy in place, with a clear procedure for implementation.
Centres must ensure that any work submitted for verification can be authenticated as the learner’s own.
Any instance of plagiarism detected by the External Verifier during sampling, will be investigated and
could lead to sanctions against the centre.
Centres should refer to the Delivering ATHE Qualifications Guide, the ATHE Malpractice and
Maladministration Policy and Guidance on Centre Malpractice Policies. These documents are available on
the ATHE website.
Guidance for Teaching and Learning
Learners learn best when they are actively involved in the learning process. We would encourage
practitioners delivering our qualifications to use a range of teaching methods and classroom-based
activities to help them get information across and keep learners engaged in the topics they are
studying. Learners should be encouraged to take responsibility for their learning and need to be able to
demonstrate a high degree of independence in applying the skills of research, analysis and evaluation.
You can facilitate this by using engaging methods of delivery that involve active learning rather than
relying on traditional methods of lecture delivery to impart knowledge.
Your approach to delivery should give the learners sufficient structure and information on which to
build without you doing the work for them. In achieving the right balance, you will need to produce wellplanned sessions that follow a logical sequence and build on the knowledge, understanding and skills
already gained.
Top Tips for Delivery
Adopt a range of teaching and learning methods, including active learning.
Plan sessions well to ensure a logical sequence of knowledge, understanding and skills
development.
Include study skills aspects, e.g. how to construct a report or Harvard Referencing. Build time
into your Scheme of Work and Session Plans to integrate study skills teaching.
Set structured additional reading and homework tasks to be discussed in class.
Elicit feedback from your students. Get them to identify where the work they have done meets
the Assessment Criteria and demonstrates achievement of the Learning Outcome.
Contextualise your activities, e.g. using real case studies as a theme through the sessions.
Use learner experience from the work place or other personal learning
Take an integrated approach to teaching topics across units, where appropriate, rather than
always taking a unit-by-unit approach. In this way, learners will be able to see the links between
the content of the different units.
There is further guidance on teaching and learning in the support materials.

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Unit Specifications
Unit Format
Each unit in ATHE’s suite of level 4 qualifications is presented in a standard format. This format
provides guidance on the requirements of the unit for learners, tutors, assessors and external verifiers.
Each unit has the following sections:
Unit Title
The unit title reflects the content of the unit. The title of each unit completed will appear on a learner’s
statement of results.
Unit Aims
The unit aims section summarises the content of the unit.
Unit Code
Each unit is assigned a RQF unit code that appears with the unit title on the Register of Regulated
Qualifications.
RQF Level
All units and qualifications in the RQF have a level assigned to them which represents the level of
achievement. The level of each unit is informed by the RQF level descriptors. The RQF level
descriptors are available on the ATHE website.
Credit Value
The credit value is the number of credits that may be awarded to a learner for the successful
achievement of the learning outcomes of a unit.
Guided Learning Hours (GLH)
Guided learning hours is an estimate of the amount of time, on average, that a tutor, trainer, workshop
facilitator etc., will work with a learner, to enable the learner to complete the learning outcomes of a unit to
the appropriate standard.
Learning Outcomes
The learning outcomes set out what a learner is expected to know, understand or be able to do as the
result of the learning process.
Assessment Criteria
The assessment criteria describe the requirements a learner is expected to meet in order to
demonstrate that the learning outcome has been achieved. Command verbs reflect the level of the
qualification.
Unit Indicative Content
The unit indicative content section provides details of the range of subject material for the programme
of learning for the unit.

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The Business Environment
Unit Aims This unit will develop learners’ understanding of the national and global
business environment and the internal and external circumstances in which
different organisations operate.
Unit Level 4
Unit code M/617/1145
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading Structure Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessor Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which demonstrates
achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards provided by the
assessment criteria. Learners must use exemplars to illustrate the points
which are made. There is a requirement to utilise information from specific
organisations to meet some of the stated standards.
Learning Outcomes.
The Learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand
types of
organisations
and their
purposes
1.1 Explain the different types
of organisations
1.2 Discuss the purposes of
different types of
organisation
1.3 Analyse the
responsibilities of
organisations
1M1 Assess the
extent to which
a specific
organisation
meets its stated
purposes
2. Understand the
structure of
organisations
2.1 Evaluate the different
types of structures found
within organisations
2.2 Explain the functions of
different departments in
organisational structures
and their inter
relationships
2.3 Evaluate the influences of
globalisation on
organisational structures.
2D1 Critically
assess the
structure of a
named
organisation,
identifying
areas for
development
3. Understand the
impact of the
market
environment on
organisations
3.1 Analyse the impact of
supply and demand on the
prices of goods and
services in markets
3.2 Analyse possible planned
interventions in the market
place and their impact on
organisations
3M1 Assess the
response of a
named
organisation to
changes in its
market

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4. Understand the
nature of the
national
environment in
which
organisations
operate
4.1 Explain the importance of
national entrepreneurship
strategy
4.2 Explain the role of
monetary and fiscal policy
and the possible impact
on organisations and their
activities
4.3 Evaluate the impact of
competition policy and
other regulatory
mechanisms on the
activities of a selected
organisation
4D1 Compare and
contrast the
benefits and
challenges to a
specific
business
operating in
different
economic
environments

Indicative Content
1. Understand types of organisations and their purposes
Types of organisations
Including private, public, government, voluntary, charitable
Purposes
Including profit, growth, return on investment (ROI) sales, service customer satisfaction,
corporate responsibility, ethical, environmental and social responsibilities, expressed though
vision, mission, aims and objectives, long and short-term goals, values, culture
Responsibilities and strategies
Responsibilities: meeting legal requirements of country or countries in which it is operating (e.g.
consumer legislation, employee legislation, equal opportunities and anti-discriminatory
legislation, environmental legislation, health and safety legislation) safety of products and
services offered, ethical practices, meeting stakeholder interests, dealing with potential conflicts
of interest
Strategies to meet responsibilities: e.g. producing and implementing business policies and
procedures, utilising quality assurance mechanisms, compliance, communication, timely
response, satisfying stakeholder objectives, taking account of business and organisation rivals
and competitors, dealing with conflicts of interest, recruitment of expertise
Meeting objectives of different stakeholders
Stakeholders: including internal and external stakeholders, e.g. financial institutions, other
lenders, debtors and creditors, owners/managers/employers, customers and clients,
employees, government, trade unions, suppliers, community
Objectives: including financial, corporate, social, ethical and environmental, achieve business
plan e.g. meet customer demand through production/sales of products and services, ensure
repeat business through standards of service, ensure commitment of suppliers through
payment agreements, generate profit for owners, and meet environmental objectives.
Potential conflict between objectives of differing stakeholders
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2. Understand the structure of organisations
Organisational structures
hierarchical structure (e.g. flat, matrix, functional, divisional), centralization vs. decentralization,
specialization, departmentalization or other form of distribution of work, span of control, chain of
command and level of formality in procedures
functions of the departments: human resource management, physical resource management,
finance, marketing and sales, communications, quality of service delivery, operations, logistics,
decision-making, performance management, defining the expected type of communication and
relationship between employees
nature of inter relationship in order to deliver mission and meet business strategy and objectives,
impact of culture
Impact of globalisation
requirements for operating globally
limitations of certain organisational structures in the global field with respect to intercultural
relations, geographical distances and different time zones
3. Understand the impact of the market environment on organisations
Supply and demand
concept of supply and demand and their relationship, time and supply, equilibrium and
disequilibrium, excess demand
examples of pricing strategies (e.g. skimming, premium, penetration, economy)
Interventions in the market place
government initiatives: taxing and subsidies, setting maximum and minimum prices, tools of
market regulation, state ownership and funding
impact of the planned interventions: correcting market failures, re-distribution of income and
wealth, managing monopolistic situations, improvement of market performance, mobility and
social inclusion
4. Understand the nature of the national environment in which organisations operate
National entrepreneurship strategy
definition, elements: country-specific market knowledge, identification of national strengths and
priorities, market niches, coherence with related national strategies, improvement of policy
framework to support entrepreneurial objectives
indicators: starting and surviving start-up companies, job growth, share of start-ups in national
income
Impact of national fiscal and monetary policy on business organisations and their activities
Impact of fiscal and monetary policy: level of profit, size and nature of employment,
redundancy, imports, exports, trading partners, business behaviour, consumer behaviour,
propensity to save, propensity to spend, tastes and preferences, expansion, downsizing
Government Policy and related agencies: including fiscal policy, monetary policy, PFI, central
and local government spending, quantitative easing, interest rates, competition commission,
sector regulators

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Impact of competition policy on the chosen organisation
Main aims/impact of competition policy: including to promote competition in markets and price
between suppliers, improve markets, contribution to efficiency and competitiveness, wider
consumer choices for goods and services, technological innovation
Other regulatory mechanisms: Will differ between country in which organisation located but UK
examples include: 4 pillars of competition policy in the UK and European Union (antitrust and
cartels, market liberalisation, state aid control, merger control), Competition Act 1998,
Enterprise Act 2002, European Commission, Office of Fair Trading, Directorate General for
Competition, Ofgem, Ofwat, Civil Aviation Authority, Companies Act, Enterprise, Training and
Skills Policies, Public Sector Borrowing
Benefits and challenges of operating in different economic environments
Benefits: may include the ability to
o complete effective market analysis
o adapt to cyclical changes
o expand business operations
o communicate effectively (within the domestic business environment)
o access and purchase high quality materials and labour
o benefit from economies of scale
Challenges: may include
o the inability to communicate effectively with the international business environment
o diseconomies of scale
o the increase in regulations and international legislations
o difficulty in adapting and meeting the needs of different cultures
o language barriers
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People in Organisations
Unit Aims This unit aims to develop knowledge and understanding of those aspects of
organisations that concern and support people. This includes
communication practices, teamwork, remote working and other
organisational structures. Using this knowledge and understanding, learners
will be able to review the impact of workplace practices on people.
Unit Level 4
Unit code L/617/1153
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading
Structure
Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which demonstrates
achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards provided by the
assessment criteria. Learners should use exemplar material to illustrate their
work and demonstrate the understanding required by the LOs.
Learning Outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand
communication
practices within
organisations
1.1 Analyse the benefits
of effective
communication to
organisations
1.2 Analyse policies and
procedures that are
used to enhance
communication
within organisations
1.3 Explain legislation
relevant to
communication
within organisations
1.4 Evaluate how the
organisational
structure impacts on
the communication
methods used
1M1 Analyse the impact
of new
technologies on
organisations’
communications
systems and
practices
2. Understand
effective
teamwork
2.1 Assess the benefits
of team working to
individuals and
organisations
2.2 Analyse why teams
might fail to meet
their objectives
2M1 Evaluate the
impact of
leadership styles
on teamwork
2D1 Analyse the
application and
effectiveness of
teamwork in a
given
organisation

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3. Understand
the issues
associated
with remote
working
3.1 Explain the
implications of the
different ways in
which people work
remotely
3.2 Evaluate common
working practices
used by those
working remotely in
different contexts
3.3 Analyse the
leadership styles
suitable for remote
working
4. Understand how
organisations
monitor and
support people
in the workplace
4.1 Explain how HR
departments can
provide support and
monitor people
within the workplace
4.2 Assess policies and
procedures designed
to support and
monitor people in the
workplace
4D1 Evaluate the
impact of
legislation on
employee
relations
management in
different
organisational
contexts

Indicative Content
1. Understand communication practices within organisations
Benefits
Accurate and timely information
Efficiency
Good relationships/effective teams
Morale
Clear messages
Customer and supplier relationships
Policies and procedures
Protocols e.g. for email,
Staff briefings
Newsletters/posters/bulletins/email groups
Briefings, regular meetings at different levels in the organisation
Cascade
Policies e.g. dealing with the media, confidentiality
Legislation
Data Protection Act 1998, GDPR 2018
Privacy and electronic communication
Freedom of Information Act
Equality Act 2010
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Confidentiality
Organisational structure
Flat/tall
Matrix
Regional
Remote offices
Dotted line reporting
Impact of new technologies
Remote working, isolation, maintaining consistency
Speed of responses
Need for damage limitation (eg due to social media)
2. Understand effective teamwork
Benefits
Synergy
Motivation
Sense of belonging
Efficiency
Creativity
Being able to utilise individual skills and experience, building on ideas and concepts
Opportunity for personal development
Failure of teams
Communication
Absence of individuals
Conflict or conversely desire not to upset other team colleagues
Imbalanced team make-up
Poor brief, lack of clarity about objectives, process
Insufficient monitoring of progress against objectives and key milestones
Leadership style
Leadership style
McGregor theory x/theory y; Goleman; Adair
Delegation
Empowerment
Teamwork theories
Herzberg – motivators and hygiene factors
Belbin
3. Understand the issues associated with remote working
Remote working
Working at home
Working from home (home-based)
Regional offices
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Virtual working
Global working
Implications
Investment in technology
Feeling remote and lonely
Challenges with communication
Working in different time zones
Different ways of behaving and doing things
Time management and irregular hours
Working practices
Teleconferencing
Webinars
Flexible hours (e.g. around personal commitments)
Regular updates, meetings
Skype
Email
Travel
Technological requirements for remote working
Broadband access with good speeds
Web based communications software eg skype, hangouts or similar
Leadership style
McGregor Theory x/Theory y
Empowerment
Goleman
Adair
4. Understand how organisations monitor and support people in the workplace
Human resources department
Ensuring the correct policies and procedures are in place
Assessing developmental needs
Dealing with disciplinary issues
Supporting in issues concerning conflict
Advising managers
Support for those leaving organisations e.g. retirement, redundancy
Policies and procedures
Recruitment and selection criteria
Job descriptions and person specifications
Contracts of employment
Flexible working/family friendly
Termination of employment
Induction, appraisal, training
Data protection
Personal issues e.g. bereavement, pregnancy
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Practices
Coaching
Mentoring
Training
Performance reviews
Appraisals
Review and appraisal process
Motivation
Monitor outputs
Manage poor performance
Reward good performance
Impact of legislation on employee relations management
Employment law relating to equality, data protection, health and safety, maternity, redundancy,
contracts of employment, industrial tribunals, trade unions, collective agreements; ethical
issues.
Strategies and processes for building employee relations
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Financial and Management Accounting Techniques for Managers
Unit Aims To develop knowledge and understanding of fundamental financial and
management accounting techniques used by managers in organisations and
to enable learners to apply these techniques.
Unit Level 4
Unit code H/617/1143
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading Structure Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which demonstrates
achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards provided by the
assessment criteria. Some learning outcomes in this unit start with ‘Be able
to’ and they require the learner to do what is stated.
Learning Outcomes.
The Learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand
financial and
management
accounting
systems
1.1 Compare
management
and financial
accounting systems
1.2 Analyse financial
and management
techniques used for
recording financial
information
1.3 Evaluate the
usefulness of
financial and
management
accounting
statements to
stakeholders
1M1 Evaluate the
benefits of financial
and management
accounting
systems for a
specific business
organisation
1D1 Evaluate how a
specific business
organisation
integrates
financial and
management
accounting
systems into their
organisational
processes
2. Be able to
assess business
organisation
performance
2.1 Analyse components
of working capital
2.2 Explain how
business
organisations can
effectively manage
working capital
2.3 Use ratios to
measure the
performance of a
business
organisation
2M1 Evaluate the
usefulness of ratio
analysis when
assessing
organisational
performance
3. Be able to apply
management
accounting
techniques
3.1 Use budget and
actual figures to
calculate and
interpret variances.
3.2 Evaluate the use of
different costing
methods for pricing
purposes
3D1 Evaluate the
benefits of
management
accounting
techniques in
supporting
financial decision

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3.3 Use capital
investment appraisal
techniques to
evaluate a specific
business decision
making to ensure
long term
financial stability

Indicative Content
1. Understand financial and management accounting systems
Management and financial accounts
Users
Outputs – information required by managers
Monthly/quarterly accounts
Useful ratios
Purpose and requirement for financial records
Legal requirements
Tax requirements
Internal control requirements
Financial Accounting Systems
Double entry bookkeeping
Day books and ledgers
Trial Balance
Annual financial statements (sole traders, partnerships, private limited companies (i.e. income
statement, statement of financial position) and Public Limited Companies (annual reports, i.e.
general corporate information, accounting policies, income statement, statement of financial
position, statement of cash flows, notes to the financial statements, chairperson’s and directors’
reports, auditor’s report).
Management Accounting Systems
Cost-accounting systems
Inventory (stock) management systems
Cash flow forecasting
Capital Investment Appraisal
Budgeting and Budgetary Control
Marginal and Absorption Costing
Break-Even Analysis
Stakeholders
Shareholders
Potential investors
Directors
Managers
Employees
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Suppliers
Customers
Lenders
Government
Analysts
Local community
2. Be able to assess business organisation performance
Working capital components
Bank and cash balances
Trade receivables (debtors)
Trade payables (creditors)
Inventory (Stock)
Management of working capital
Working capital ratios – calculation and evaluation
Ways to manage working capital – payment and collection cycles, inventory control, overdrafts,
introduction of Just In Time (JIT) system etc.
Ratio analysis
Liquidity ratios (current ratio, acid test (quick) ratio)
Profitability ratios (Mark-up, Gross Profit margin, Net profit margin, Return on capital employed)
Efficiency ratios (Inventory turnover, Trade receivables collection period, Trade payables
payment days)
3. Be able to apply management accounting techniques
Budgetary control
Purpose and content of budgets
Cash flow forecasts
Budgetary control process
Importance of budgets for management
Zero based budgeting, incremental budgeting
Advantages and disadvantages of budgets
Variances
Flexing the budget
Calculating variances
Explaining variances – financial and non-financial factors
Reconciliation of budgeted to actual profit
Advantages and disadvantages of variance analysis
Costing and pricing
Classifying costs – direct/indirect, fixed/variable
Calculating unit cost
Dealing with overheads – full absorption costing and overview of other costing methods
Pricing – cost plus, marginal cost, price takers etc.
Break-even analysis
Marginal costing
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Appraisal methods
Accounting rate of return
Payback
Net present value
Internal rate of return
Evaluation
Strengths and weaknesses of each method
Non-financial factors – organisational goals and vision, time factors etc.
Organisational preference.
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Communication Skills for Business
Unit Aims This unit aims to develop knowledge and understanding of the
communication practices within organisations and learners are introduced
to the different modes and channels of communication used in
organisations. In addition, learners will be able to develop their
communication skills. Learners will also apply their own communication
skills to typical organisational requirements.
Unit Level 4
Unit code J/617/1149
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading Structure Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which
demonstrates achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards
provided by the assessment criteria. Assessors should also note that LOs
4 and 5 require learners to demonstrate that they are able to do what is
stated in the LO and this cannot be achieved by purely theoretical work.
Learning Outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand how
internal
communication
takes place within
organisations
1.1 Explain the process
of communication
within organisations
1.2 Assess the
appropriate use of
different internal
modes of
communication for
different purposes
1.3 Analyse barriers to
effective
communication within
organisations
1M1 Analyse possible
legal and ethical
issues in
relation to the
communication
of information
within
organisations
2. Understand how
organisations
communicate with
customers
2.1 Evaluate formal
communication
systems used by
organisations to
communicate with
customers
2.2 Analyse the
effectiveness of using
social media to
communicate with
customers
2.3 Assess the images
organisations portray
through their
communications

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3. Understand the
factors that
impact on the
effectiveness of
communications
in business
3.1 Analyse the
impact of
relationships
found in
organisations on
effective
communications
3.2 Assess the
impact of non
verbal
communication
on the
effectiveness of
oral
communications
3.3 Assess the impact of
technology on oral
and written
communication
3.4 Review the use of
conventions in written
communications
3M1 Evaluate the
effectiveness of a
range of
communications
(verbal and non
verbal) in
contributing to the
success of a
specified
organisation
4. Be able to present
oral information
effectively
4.1 Design an oral
presentation for a
specified audience
4.2 Present complex
information orally
using technology
4.3 Assess effectiveness
of own communication
4D1 Adapt and use
own oral
communication
for different
specified
audiences and
purposes
5. Be able to
communicate
effectively in
writing
5.1 Communicate
complex information
for specific purposes
5.2 Document a meeting
5.3 Use charts and
graphs to convey
quantitative data
5.4 Review own written
communication
5D1 Adapt and use
own written
communication
for different
audiences and
purposes

Indicative Content
1. Understand how internal communication takes place within organisations
The process of communication
A dynamic process
Sender has an idea
Idea/message sent
Message transmitted to receiver
Receiver gets message
Receiver gives feedback (responds) to message
Modes of communication

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Written – letters, bulletins, noticeboards, updates, newsletter letters, bulletins, noticeboards,
updates, newsletter
Face to face /oral – briefings, appraisal, daily/weekly huddles meetings (departmental, weekly
updates, team meetings; interviews, appraisals, disciplinary, sales, annual general meeting
(AGM); extraordinary general meeting (EGM),
Electronic – email, Facebook, twitter, blog, intranet, yammer, Skype
Conferences/ whole staff meetings
Training events; webinars
Purposes of communicate
To provide information, to gain information/understanding, to generate ideas, to generate team
cohesion, to motivate
To send information vertically (upward and downward) and horizontally
To provide information formally and informally
Barriers
Clarity of written/oral message – readability, language, tone
Technology – poor connections, inappropriate use
Interpersonal relationships – personal conflict
Non-verbal communication
Possible legal and ethical issues
Legal:
Freedom of Information Act
General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
Equality legislation
Ethical:
Use of email
Whistle-blowing
Organisational policies
2. Understand how organisations communicate with customers
Formal communications
Websites, brochures, letters, newsletters, email, emails, telephone calls, face to face, social
media
Purpose of communicating by social media
Generate business, accessing market segments
Network
Image E.g. contemporary; traditional; energised; cutting edge
Public relations (PR)
Remain up to date
Images organisations portray through communications
Reputation
Identity
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Ethos
Organisation vision
Customer standards
3. Understand the factors that impact on the effectiveness of communications in business
Impact of relationships found in organisations
Team cohesion
Personal conflict
Favouritism
Hierarchical, line management, culture
Impact of non-verbal communication
Tone of voice, body language
Negative and positive, reinforcement of oral message/contradiction of oral message
Active listening and focusing
Impact of technology
Negative – reliance on technology at meetings/presentations; can create stress;
Positive – enhance clarity of information, helps reinforce messages, can help those with
different learning styles;
Conventions in written communications
Formal reports, informal reports, emails, letters, texts
Greetings, sign off, tone, punctuation and grammar, use of first or third person
Effectiveness
Clarity (e.g. of purpose, information, actions required); layout, length
Message received is the same as the one that is sent
The purpose is achieved (e.g. motivational speech, disciplinary letter, consultative email)
4. Be able to present oral information effectively
Oral presentation
Formal presentation to a small group e.g. staff, colleagues, management
Complex information
General – introductory
Complex – facts, figures, data
Technology
Presentation software
ICT e.g. spread sheets, hand-outs
Effectiveness
Were intended purposes met?
Appropriateness of language used and body language
Audience understanding and response
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Quality and appropriateness of information given
5. Be able to communicate effectively in writing
Communicate complex information
In writing e.g. reports, briefing notes, press releases, social media (e.g. Facebook, twitter and
blogs), meeting documentation
Purpose e.g. to present results to the board, to launch a marketing campaign
Document a meeting
Agenda, minutes, papers
Quantitative data
E.g. financial results, sales figures, changes in product features, productivity, energy efficiency
Review written communication
For clarity, readability, appropriateness of media, use of visuals (e.g. charts, graphs, pictures);
tone language
Review and adapt written communications
(e.g. website, social media posts, letters, emails),
clarity
selection of material
choice of channel for purpose
tone / style of presentation (formal, informal)
suitability for intended audience
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Resource Management
Unit Aims The aim of this unit is to provide an overview of the human and physical
resources needed in a range of organisations, including those in the primary,
service and manufacturing sectors. The unit develops an understanding of
the impact of efficiency on organisations. Learners will use this knowledge
and understanding to review the effective use of resources within an
organisation.
Unit Level 4
Unit code J/617/1152
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading
Structure
Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which demonstrates
achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards provided by the
assessment criteria. Learners should use exemplar material to illustrate their
work. This is particularly the case where AC refer to an organisation.
Learning Outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand the
key features of
resource
management
1.1 Analyse the differing
resource
requirements of
organisations in
different sectors of
the economy
1.2 Explain the
importance of
resource
management and
how this is achieved
1D1 Evaluate internal
and external
factors which
impact on
resource
management
2. Understand the
importance of
the effective use
of physical
resources
2.1 Evaluate how the use
of physical resources
is monitored and
managed
2.2 Evaluate the
measures to reduce
the impact of
resource wastage
2.3 Assess the costs of
high profile
technological failures
2.4 Assess the business
case for the use of
ethical and
sustainable
resources
2M1 Evaluate recent
cases of resource
wastage and how
waste could be
used as a
resource, using
examples

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3. Understand how
to use human
resources
effectively
3.1 Assess the need for
human resource
planning in the
workplace
3.2 Evaluate the methods
used to monitor
employee
performance
3.3 Assess the
effectiveness of
reward systems in
different contexts
3D1 Evaluate the
impact of
employee
engagement in an
organisation
4. Understand how
to review the
effective use of
resources
4.1 Explain the data
needed to review
and make
judgements on
employee
performance
4.2 Explain the data
needed to review
and make
judgements on the
utilisation of physical
resources
4M1 Evaluate how
resource
management
practices have
contributed to
business success
or failure, using
examples.

Indicative Content
1. Understand the key features of resource management
Organisations
Primary e.g. mining,
Secondary e.g. Manufacturing, electronics, engineering
Tertiary e.g. service industries e.g. tourism, finance, catering
Resource requirements
Raw materials
equipment
Human resources/know how
Technology
Facilities
Time
Transport
Requirements
Compliance with legislation, codes of practice
Health and Safety e.g. hazardous substances
Environmental e.g. disposal, impact on environment,
Employment e.g. diversity and inclusion, health and safety at work
Storage facilities
Waste/recycling systems
Specialist training
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Management information systems
Importance of resource management
Efficiency
Reducing costs, prevent wastage, increasing profit
Resource management strategies
Stock taking – manual; electronic
Security systems
Human resource management
Reusing wastage
Internal and external factors impacting on resource management
External
Regulations/legislation
Economic conditions
Technological advancements
Competition
Internal
Budget
Existing staff skills level
Productivity/level of growth
2. Understand the importance of the effective use of physical resources
Monitoring and management of physical resources
Buying and ordering systems
Schedules
Preferred suppliers
Just-in-time management
Stock control systems
Impact of resource wastage
Financial costs, reduced profits
Need for disposal of excess/out of date stock
Poor image e.g. public outcry at waste
Goods not delivered/manufactured/supplied
Loss of customer base
Delays in production
Environmental damage
Waste used as a resource
Examples include, straw used as a fuel, biomass, concrete (building waste) used to create
insulation materials (Rockwool)

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Resource wastage
Technological failures, for example NHS computer system, fire service control centre, system,
MOD procurement system
Human failures
The business case
Business profile/image
Marketing advantage, competitor advantage
Ethical and sustainable reasons
3. Understand how to use human resources effectively
Human resource planning
Respond to change – in the organisation, to external factors
Staff turnover
Forecasting HR requirements
Responding to employment trends
At micro level – to organise staff e.g. terms of employment, staff rotas, holidays
Monitoring and improving employee performance
Key performance indicators (KPIs)
Appraisals
Statistics e.g. sales figures
Targets
Customer feedback
Training – internal and external
Reward systems
Performance related pay
Bonuses
Advancement/promotion
Status
Share options
Employee engagement
Training; personal development
Working environment
Work/life balance
Flexible working
Social events; subscription to sports facilities
4. Understand how to review the effective use of resources
Data on employee performance
Absenteeism; sickness
Statistics e.g. sales figures
Performance against targets
Customer feedback, levels of positive and negative feedback/complaints, levels of returns
Repeat sales
Data on utilisation of physical resources

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Budget restraints
Statistics e.g. sales figures
Performance against targets
Customer feedback, levels of positive and negative feedback/complaints, levels of returns
Repeat sales
Targets
Key performance indicators (KPIs)
Examples of organisations where resource management practices have contributed to business
success or failure
Amazon
Sports direct
Carillion
Capita
Ryanair
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The Marketing Mix
Unit Aims To develop a comprehensive understanding of the marketing mix and the
roles of the seven aspects of the marketing mix to businesses.
Unit Level 4
Unit code R/617/1249
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading
Structure
Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which demonstrates
achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards provided by the
assessment criteria. Learners will need to use exemplar material to
demonstrate achievement of the standards.
Learning Outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand the
role of the
product or
service in the
marketing mix
1.1 Analyse how the
features and
benefits of a
product or
service are used
in the marketing
mix
1.2 Describe the
use of the
marketing mix at
each stage of
the Product Life
Cycle
1M1 Analyse how a
business can
create lifetime
value to a
customer by using
the Customer Life
Cycle
1D1 Evaluate the role
of the product or
service in the
marketing mix of
a chosen
organisation
2. Understand the
role of price in
the marketing
mix
2.1 Analyse the use
of pricing to
reflect the
perceived value
of the benefits of
a product to the
buyer
2.2 Analyse the use
of pricing to
offset the costs
of product
manufacturing
and/or service
delivery
2M1 Analyse the effects
of adjusting the
price of a product
or service
2D1 Evaluate the
role of price in
the marketing
mix of a chosen
organisation

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3. Understand the
role of place in
the marketing
mix
3.1 Analyse the role
of direct and
indirect
distribution
channels to
move products
and services
from the
provider to the
buyer
3.2 Analyse the use
of intensive
distribution,
selective
distribution and
exclusive
distribution in
the market
coverage of
products and
services
3M1 Assess the
advantages of
using a direct
marketing channel
3D1 Evaluate the
role of place in
the marketing
mix of a chosen
organisation
4. Understand the
role of
promotion in
the marketing
mix
4.1 Analyse the
aims of
promotion in the
marketing mix
4.2 Explain how the
success of a
promotional
campaign is
measured
5. Understand the
role of process
in the
marketing mix
5.1 Explain the role
of marketing
processes which
take place with
the customer
present
5.2 Explain the role
of marketing
processes which
take place
before and after
the customer
interface
5.3 Analyse how the
role of process
in the marketing
mix leads to
customer focus

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6. Understand the
role of people
in the
marketing mix
6.1 Analyse the
importance of
recruiting the
right people to
become
customer facing
staff in
businesses
6.2 Analyse the
importance to
businesses of
training
customer-facing
and non
customer-facing
staff
7. Understand the
role of physical
evidence in the
marketing mix
7.1 Analyse the role
of physical
evidence in the
marketing mix

Indicative Content
1. Role of the product or service in marketing mix
Features and benefits of products or services
Product and service information and descriptions are provided to potential customers
Features of products and services – what it does
Benefits of products and services – how it benefits the customer
Comparison against features and benefits of competitor products and services
Importance of having the right product or service which is of interest to customers
Use of marketing mix at each stage of Product Life Cycle
Development: piloting of prototypes with customers, customer involvement in development
Introduction: sales strategies, create product or service awareness, trialling
Growth: maximise market share, service and warranty, penetration strategy, intensive
distribution, promotion
Decline: reduce expenditure, phase out weak products and services, cut price, selective
distribution
How a business can create lifetime value to a customer by using the Customer Life Cycle
Consider the products and services that customers might need at different stages of their lives
Target appropriate products and services at appropriate times
Evaluate the role of product or service in the marketing mix of a chosen organisation
Content will vary according to product or service and organisation chosen
Positive and negative use of product or service
2. Role of price in marketing mix
Use of pricing to reflect the perceived value of the benefits of a product to the buyer
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Use of pricing
Perceived price paid
Perception of benefits of a product to the buyer
Use of pricing to offset the costs of product manufacturing and/or service delivery
Profit margin generation
Penetration pricing to gain market share prior to price increase
Economy pricing for no-frills products and services
Price skimming: initial higher price while a business has competitive advantage
Psychological pricing: consumer responds on emotional rather than rational basis
Product line pricing: incremental pricing for basic, medium and high level product or service
Optional pricing: use of optional extras to increase overall price
Captive product pricing: premium pricing when consumer has no choice
Product bundle pricing: combining several products or services in one package
Promotional pricing: BOGOF, money off vouchers, discounts
Geographical pricing: variations in price according to location
Premium pricing: high price for a unique brand where there is substantial competitive
advantage
Effects of adjusting the price of a product or service
Changes marketing strategy
Affects demand
Affects sales
Can impact on cash flow
Can impact perception of quality
Evaluate the role of price in the marketing mix of a chosen organisation
Content will vary according to product or service and organisation chosen
Positive and negative use of price
3. Role of place in marketing mix
Role of distribution channels
chain of distribution channel: wholesalers, retailers, distributors, internet
direct channel (end consumer buys straight from manufacturer)
indirect channel (end consumer buys from wholesaler or retailer)
Use of types of distribution of products and services for market coverage
Intensive distribution
Selective distribution
Exclusive distribution
Advantages of using a direct marketing channel
Business obtains personal feel of market due to direct contact
Easy to adapt to changes required thanks to immediate customer feedback
Can control product pricing
Evaluate the role of place in the marketing mix of a chosen organisation
Content will vary according to product or service and organisation chosen
Positive and negative use of place
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4. Role of promotion in marketing mix
Aims of promotion in the marketing mix
Functions of promotion: persuade, remind, inform, sell, respond to competition, increase
market share
Promotion of corporate identity
How the success of a promotional campaign is measured
Actual sales against sales targets
Customer recall
Press coverage
Customer loyalty: repeat business
5. Role of process in marketing mix
Process activities
Technological
Manufacturing: adapting to needs of customers
Electronic: Electronic Point-Of-Sale (EPOS); barcodes; checkouts; loyalty cards
Direct: at customer interface
Indirect: before, during and after customer interface
Integration of telemarketing and internet marketing
How role of process in the marketing mix leads to customer focus
Customer retention
Marketing of other products and services to customers (cross-selling)
Can tailor process to needs of different individuals
6. Role of people in marketing mix
Importance of recruiting the right people to become customer facing staff in businesses
People underpin customer relationship between the business and the consumer. (People buy
from people)
Relationships can add value to transactions
People provide expertise on business and its products and services and ask questions to
ascertain customers’ needs and wants
Importance to the business of training customer-facing and non-customer-facing staff
Staff are knowledgeable and skilled
Staff can add value by offering customers technical support, expertise and advice
Staff can support sales, marketing and customer service processes from start to end
Staff have appropriate attitude and appearance to represent the business and build its reputation
Staff take responsibility for seamless transactions and customer service
7. Role of physical evidence in marketing mix
Physical environment
Ambience
Spatial layout
Corporate branding: signs, symbols, artefacts; packaging, webpages, brochures, uniforms,
business cards.

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Corporate Social Responsibility
Unit Aims To develop an understanding of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)
issues and impacts of CSR policy. Learners will be able to use their
knowledge and understanding to make recommendations for responsible
business practice.
Unit Level 4
Unit code L/617/1248
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading Structure Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which
demonstrates achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards
provided by the assessment criteria. Some criteria require application of
the knowledge and understanding to a specified organisation.
Learning Outcomes The
learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand current
corporate social
responsibility
issues facing
business
1.1 Analyse the
regulatory
framework for
CSR
1.2 Analyse
environmental
issues in CSR
1.3 Analyse social
and community
issues in CSR
1M1 Assess changing
attitudes to CSR
1D1 Evaluate the
success of a
chosen
organisation in
managing CSR
issues
2. Understand the
impact of corporate
social responsibility
policy on
different
stakeholders.
2.1 Assess the
benefits of CSR
to employees
2.2 Analyse the
impact of CSR
on the supply
chain
2.3 Explain how a
CSR policy
impacts on the
Senior
Management
Team and
business
performance
2M1 Assess the
potential conflicts
which may arise
between the
needs and
expectations of
different
stakeholders
3. Be able to make
recommendations
for responsible
business practice.
3.1 Review the
CSR policy of a
specific
business
3.2 Recommend
changes to CSR
policy to benefit
3D1 Assess the extent
of voluntarism in
CSR policy

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different
stakeholders
3.3 Assess the
potential impact
of changes in
CSR on
business
performance

Indicative Content
1. Understand current corporate social responsibility issues facing business
Definitions of CSR
Behaving responsibly
Contributing to a better society
Integrating social and environmental concerns in business
The Triple Bottom Line – people, planet and profit
Voluntary nature
Regulatory frameworks
ISO 26000 Social responsibility – voluntary guidance
Environmental protection
Health and safety legislation
Human rights legislation
Compliance with employment legislation
Environmental issues
Recycling policies
Sustainability
Use of packaging
Logistics of delivery, congestion
Use of scarce resources
Pollution
Carbon footprint
Economic and political issues
Location of suppliers
Supporting local business
Supporting developing countries
Fair trade
Non-acceptance of global agreements
Social and community issues
Employing socially disadvantaged and disabled people
Sponsorship
Encouraging education and training
Volunteering
Social enterprise
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Changing attitudes
Opportunity for growth
Opportunity to engage with customers
Committed leadership
Opportunity for innovation
2. Understand the impact of corporate social responsibility policy on different stakeholders
Benefits to employees
Improved working conditions
Reduced discrimination
Compliance with legislation
Whistleblowing policy
Feel-good factor
Impacts on supply chain
Ethics in production
Responsible sourcing
Reduced transport costs
Reduced carbon footprint
Use of technology in supply chain management
Impacts on business performance
Improved sales
Improved profits
Conflicts of interest between stakeholders
Competitive edge
Impacts on marketing strategy
Ethical policies
Brand differentiation
Recognition of different cultures
Cause related marketing campaigns
Customers willingness to pay more for ethical products
Shareholders’ return on investment
Increased costs
Conflicts between stakeholders
Using profit for shareholder dividends versus reinvestment
Disagreement over CSR approach
Disagreement over chosen environmental/social areas supported
3. Be able to make recommendations for responsible business practice
Examples of businesses
Manufacturing
Financial services
Hospitality
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Retail
Not for profit
Changes to CSR policy
Adapting business practice
Ethical leadership
Ethics in production and sales
Engaging in corporate philanthropy
Codes of conduct
Environmental reporting
Different stakeholders
Customers
Shareholders
Owners
Suppliers
Local and non-local communities
Impact of changes on business performance
Enhanced public image
Increased sales/profits
Risk management
Competitive edge
Improved recruitment and retention of staff
Increased costs
Increased prices
Voluntarism
Response to pressure groups
Effectiveness of voluntary practice.
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Managing a Work-Based Team Project
Unit Aims This unit aims to develop project management skills for a work-based team
project by implementing the different stages of project development,
implementation and review.
Unit Level 4
Unit code D/617/1156
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading Structure Pass – Merit – Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which
demonstrates achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards
provided by the assessment criteria. Learners will be required to develop
a proposal for a work-based team project, plan the project, implement the
plan and evaluate the project. Assessors should note that all of the LOs in
this unit require the learner to do what is stated, so this unit cannot be
approached from a theoretical standpoint.
Learning Outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Be able to develop a
proposal for a work
based team project
1.1 Identify the objectives
of the project
1.2 Identify the scope of
the project
1.3 Propose ways of
monitoring and
evaluating the project
1D1 Evaluate the
benefits of the
project to the
organisation
2. Be able to plan the
work-based team
project
2.1 Propose project
management
methodology
2.2 Plan the activities for
the project and allocate
roles and
responsibilities to
individual team
members
2.3 Plan key milestones for
the project
2.5 Analyse the resources
required to undertake
the project
2.6 Carry out a risk
assessment for the
project
2D1 Explain the
quality
assurance
requirements of
the project and
justify the
management
control points
needed

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3. Be able to implement
the plan for a work
based team project
3.1 Carry out the plan,
logging activities
3.2 Manage risks and
issues identified during
the project, noting
decisions taken
3M1 Manage the
quality control
requirements of
the project and
document the
outcomes
4. Be able to evaluate the
process and outcomes
of the project
4.1 Analyse feedback
gathered from
stakeholders about the
project
4.2 Evaluate performance
of the project against
the objectives and
quality requirements
4M1 Evaluate own
and team
members’
performance
within the project

Indicative Content
1. Develop proposal for a work-based team project
Objectives
Strategic
Financial
Organisational
Personal development
Team building
Scope
Outputs
Financial
Time
Quality
Out of scope
Ways of monitoring the project
Meetings
Reporting
Data analysis
Risks and issues
Managing quality
Ways of evaluating the project
Success criteria
Self-evaluation
Peer evaluation
Customer evaluation
Benefits to organisation
Strategic
Financial
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Competitive
Innovative
Kudos
Benefits customers
2. Plan the work-based team project
Project management methodology
Critical path analysis
Gantt charts
PERT analysis
Project management methods e.g. Prince2, Agile
Activity planning
Identification of activities
Ordering of activities in a logical order
Identification of interdependencies
Critical path
Key milestones
Milestones at which decision will be taken to continue or stop project
Physical/technology resources
Work space
Documentation
Other physical
Technology
Financial resources
Budget
Sources of funding
Contingency
Human resources
Allocation of team members’ roles
Roles and responsibilities
External expertise
Risk assessment
Identification of risks
Likelihood of risk
Severity of risk
Contingencies
Quality requirements
Acceptance criteria
Line manager/customer’s quality expectations
Quality log; review
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Quality plan
Product description and quality criteria
Stage quality plan
Management control points
Project initiation decision
End stage assessment
Highlight reports
Tolerance
Exception reports
Project closure
3. Implement the plan for a work-based team project
Carry out plan
Track activities completed
Risk and issue management
Identification and logging of risks and issues
Contingency planning
Mitigation
Management of risks and issues
Risk and issue log
Manage quality
Quality check: fitness for use of the project outcome, and adherence to requirements
4. Evaluate the process and outcomes of the project
Collection of feedback
Identification of stakeholders to provide feedback
Verbal and written feedback
Project review meetings and discussions
Lessons learned meeting
Analysis of feedback
Use of feedback to identify common patterns and themes
Summary of patterns and themes
Evaluation of project
Evaluation of project outcomes against project aims and objectives
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Entrepreneurship
Unit aims To provide the learner with an understanding of entrepreneurship in
business, the skills and qualities needed by a successful entrepreneur and
the roles an entrepreneur plays in starting and developing businesses. The
learner will develop skills in evaluating possible new business ventures
and will be able to prepare for a new business venture.
Unit level 4
Unit code H/617/1157
GLH 15
Credit value 60
Unit grading structure Pass – Merit – Distinction
Assessment guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which
demonstrates achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards
provided by the assessment criteria, using relevant examples to illustrate
their work. In order to achieve LO3 and LO4 learners are required to
provide evidence to show that they are able to do what is stated in the
learning outcomes.
Learning outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand
entrepreneurship
in business
1.1 Analyse the
entrepreneurial
lifecycle
1.2 Evaluate how
entrepreneurship is
encouraged and
supported in different
countries
1M1Analyse the impact of
entrepreneurship on
the economy
2. Understand the
skills and
qualities of a
successful
entrepreneur
2.1 Analyse the different
types of entrepreneur
2.2 Analyse the
combination of
personal skills and
qualities in
entrepreneurs which
distinguish them from
other managers in
organisations
3. Be able to
evaluate the
viability of a new
entrepreneurial
idea.
3.1 Propose and justify a
range of new
entrepreneurial ideas
for further
development
3.2 Assess the application
of a model/theory of
innovation for new
business opportunities
3D1 Justify the
recommenda
tion to
develop a
workable
new business
venture

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Indicative Content
1. Understand entrepreneurship in business
What is entrepreneurship
Entrepreneurial lifecycle: new idea conception; creation of organisation to harvest
opportunity; harvesting of opportunity
New business ventures, business start-ups
Opening new markets; fulfilling a new need; identifying a gap in the market; new products
and services; new business models; disruptive business models
Entrepreneurship vs established business management
Can create employment and wealth
European Commission Entrepreneurship 2020 Action Plan; Entrepreneur First (EF)
World Economic Forum – Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
DIT Global Entrepreneur programme; entrepreneurship visa; TechStars London
2. Understand the skills and qualities of a successful entrepreneur
Types of entrepreneur; small business entrepreneur; lifestyle entrepreneur; high-growth
potential entrepreneur; professional entrepreneur; serial entrepreneur, corporate
entrepreneur, social entrepreneur
Skills and qualities: risk-taking; organising; motivating people; drawing together a team of
people with relevant skills; creativity; opportunity analysis; speed of taking action to take
advantage of opportunities; decision-making; innovative; hard-working; passionate; able to
sell ideas and convince others; perseverant; resilient; imaginative; motivated; problemsolving; vision, teamwork, commitment
3. Be able to evaluate the viability of a new entrepreneurial idea
New business opportunities: services, products, new business models
Idea generation
Model/theory: Drucker’s 7 sources of innovation
Making recommendations: selection of workable idea; justifying the business case; financial
projections; customer base; gap in market; need for product/service
4. Be able to prepare for a new business venture

4. Be able to
prepare for a
new business
venture.
4.1 Analyse the
component parts of an
effective business
start-up plan
4M1 Analyse brand
development and
promotion aspects
of launching an
effective new
business venture
4D1 Develop a
start-up plan
for a chosen
new business
venture

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Component parts of an effective business plan; executive summary; business description;
market analysis; organisation management; sales strategies; funding requirements;
financial projections
Developing a brand: link with business strategy; identification of target customers; research
of target customers; develop of brand positioning; developing of messaging strategy;
development of name, logo and tagline; development of content marketing strategy;
development of branded items (e.g. website, business cards)
Business promotion; marketing plan; social networks; promotional products, adverts,
samples
Business start-up plan: strategy; team; financial objectives and projections; form of
business organisation and legal set-up; product/service and their features and benefits;
market; customer analysis; competitors; market positioning; sales and marketing strategy;
operations; payback plan (is using loans and other people’s investment)

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Customer Relationship Management
Unit Aims Learners will be able to develop knowledge and understanding of the scope
and importance of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and to
explore how effective CRM is achieved.
Unit Level 4
Unit code F/617/1151
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading
Structure
Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which demonstrates
achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards provided by the
assessment criteria. Learners will be required to carry out research into
customer relationship management and for LO4, produce a plan for a
specific organisation.
Learning Outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand the
importance of
customer
relationship
management to
business
1.1 Explain the key
features of customer
relationship
management
1.2 Analyse the benefits
of good customer
relationship
management
to business
1.3 Analyse the impact of
quality management
systems on
customer
relationship
management
1M1 Evaluate the
methods used to
measure customer
satisfaction
2. Understand how
good customer
relationship
management is
achieved
2.1 Evaluate the
processes
necessary for
achieving effective
customer
relationship
management
2.2 Assess the role of
internal staff in
achieving effective
customer relations
experiences
2.3 Assess the role of
external
stakeholders in
2D1 Analyse the
impact of
employee
engagement on
customer
relations
experiences

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achieving effective
customer relations
3. Understand the
use of loyalty
schemes in
customer
relationship
management
3.1 Analyse the use of
loyalty schemes to
gain information
about customers
3.2 Explain how the
information gained is
used to inform
business decision
making
3D1 Evaluate methods
used to segment
customers as part
of a customer
relationship
management
process, in a
specific
organisation
4. Be able to plan
improvements
to customer
relationship
management in
a chosen
organisation
4.1 Review customer
relationship
management in an
organisation
4.2 Propose
improvements to
processes for
customer
relationship
management
4.3 Propose
improvements to the
role of staff in
promoting good
customer
relationships
4.4 Produce a plan for
the implementation
of improvements
4M1 Gain feedback on
your plan and
make amendments

Indicative Content
1. Understand the importance of customer relationship management to business
Key features
Definition e.g. strategies to learn more about customers and improve relationships with
them
Collecting customer information
Systems to store customer information
Access to information for appropriate personnel
Analysis of customer behaviour


Benefits
Use of data to inform marketing, customer service and quality systems

Increased profits
Competitive advantage
Increased sales due to better understanding of customer requirements
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Effective marketing targeted at known customer profiles
Personalised approach to customers
Increased customer satisfaction
Increased customer retention
Quality Management
Total quality management
ISO standards
Balanced Scorecard
Measuring customer satisfaction
Formal/informal
repeat business, customer loyalty
Net Promoter Score (NPS)
Customer feedback
Complaints
2. Understand how good customer relationship management is achieved
Processes
Creating a customer culture
Collecting and processing customer information
Making systems customer based
Supporting with effective IT
Complaints procedures
Internal staff
Senior management
IT managers
Operational managers
Front line
Administration
Roles
Determination of aims and objectives of CRM
Choice of system
Implementation and management of system
Liaison with software suppliers
Analysis and use of data
Implementing customer service policies and processes
Understanding of customer service as a key responsibility
Role model
Training
External stakeholders
Shareholders
Suppliers
Community groups
Customers
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Roles
Agreeing strategies
Reporting
Sharing information
Complying with customer service policies
Acting in partnership
Giving feedback
Impact of employee engagement
Increased job satisfaction
Increased productivity/efficiency
Better service
Satisfied customers/repeat business
3. Understand the use of loyalty schemes in customer relationship management
Information from loyalty schemes
Purchasing habits
Opinions
Preferences
Profiles of customers
Use of information
Targeting groups of customers
Product development to meet customer needs
Adapting marketing mix
Personalising marketing
Choice of media for promotion
Segmentation by
Geography
Products purchased
Stage in family lifecycle
Loyalty
Consumer spends
4. Be able to plan improvements to customer relationship management in a chosen organisation
Review
Systems in use
Current role of staff
Service policies in use
Quality benchmarks used
Quality of customer service
Available data on customer satisfaction
Potential improvements to processes
New software systems
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Customer service policies
Working towards recognised quality standards
Introduction of mystery shoppers
Introduction of a CSR department
Potential improvements to the role of staff
Recruitment of right staff
Training
Clear vision and mission
Appropriate access to customer data
Gain feedback from
colleagues
customers
managers
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Administrative Services
Unit Aims Learners will be able to develop knowledge and understanding of the
range of administrative services that might be offered to managers or
departments within organisations. Learners with also be able to
develop skills needed for effective administration in organisations.
Unit Level 4
Unit code A/617/1147
GLH 60
Credit Value 15
Unit Grading Structure Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which
demonstrates achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards
provided by the assessment criteria. Learners will research the range
of administrative services and demonstrate administrative skills.
Tutors should note that in order to achieve the LOs at the standards
provided, learners will need to refer to a range of exemplar material,
use organisational systems and support actual meetings and events.
Aspects of this unit cannot be achieved from a theoretical perspective.
Learning Outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand the range
and diversity of
administrative
services and their
context
1.1 Explain the
different
administrative
services that
may be offered
in organisations
1.2 Analyse the
skills required to
deliver effective
administrative
services
1.3 Explain the
legal
requirements
relevant to
administrative
services
1D1 Explain the
challenges of
providing
administrative
services in
organisations
and propose
solutions to the
challenges
presented
2. Understand how to
create and use
organisational
systems
2.1 Evaluate the
different types
of filing systems
2.2 Set up a filing
system
2.3 Set up a stock
control system
2.4 Analyse the
importance of
keeping
2M1 Review the
operation of an
organisational
system and
propose ideas
for its
improvement

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accurate
records
3. Be able to support
meetings and events
3.1 Produce
documentation
for meetings
3.2 Analyse policies
and procedures
for setting up
meetings and
events
3M1 Review and
propose
improvements to
policies and
procedures for
meetings in a
specific
organisation
3D1 Produce a plan
for a stated event
to ensure its
operational
feasibility
4. Understand the
importance of
effective
communications in
providing
administrative
services in the
workplace
4.1 Analyse the
need for
effective
communication
in the provision
of administrative
services to meet
business
objectives
4.2 Evaluate the
suitability of
different
communication
methods in the
provision of
effective
administrative
services in the
workplace

Indicative Content
1. Range and diversity of administrative services
Administrative services
Clerical services
Data management
Supervising junior staff
Record keeping
Managing mail
Diary management
Supporting meetings and events
Payroll
Reception duties
Customer service
Technology management
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Skills
Communication; planning, prioritisation
IT
Organisation
Time management
Teamwork
Legal requirements
Data Protection Act and GDPR
Health and Safety at Work Act e.g. Display Screen Equipment Regulations
Employment legislation
Equality Act
Challenges
Managing specific needs of different personnel
Adapting to different management styles
Planning and prioritising
Utilising technology to streamline processes
Solutions
Any suitable solutions, e.g. communication, planning, negotiation
2. Organisational systems
Filing systems
Electronic /cloud
Alphabetic
Geographic
Numeric
Chronological
Subject
Stock control
Bar coding
Radio frequency identification
Just in time
First in first out
Record keeping
Sales ledger
Purchase ledger
Financial records
Meeting notes
Email records
Improvements to systems
Technological, communication
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3. Support meetings and events
Meeting and event planning
Physical or virtual venue
Bookings
Catering
Timings
Planning to budget
Promotion/invitation
Attendees
Meeting documentation
Agenda
Minutes
Distribution lists
Papers for the meeting
Analysis of policies and procedures for meetings and events
Type of system
Ease of use
Budget versus cost
Accessibility
Fitness for purpose
Reporting lines
Improvements to policies and procedures
Any e.g. use of systems, communication
4. Importance of effective communication in the workplace
Importance of effective communication
Clarity
Common understanding
Two-way conversations
Makes organisation effective
Different communication methods
Face to face meetings
Virtual meetings
Telephone
Electronic messaging systems
Suitability of communication system for person or situation
Impact of poor communication
Inefficiency
Negativity
Confusion
Effective communication
Any suitable idea e.g. 10 minute daily stand-up meeting, face to face in private for difficult
conversations

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Managing Information and Knowledge
Unit aims To provide the learner with an understanding of the key concepts of managing
information and knowledge in a business setting.
Unit level 4
Unit code A/617/1228
GLH 60
Credit value 15
Unit grading
structure
Pass
Assessment
guidance
In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which demonstrates
achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards provided by the
assessment criteria. Learners should provide examples to illustrate the points
which are made and demonstrate the understanding required by the LOs.
Learning
outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand
the
managemen
t of
information
and
knowledge
in the
workplace.
1.1 Analyse ways to
share information and
knowledge in the
work place
1.2 Analyse ways to look
after information and
knowledge in the
work place
1D1 Differentiate
between
information
management and
knowledge
management in
the workplace
2. Understand
the sources
of
information
and
knowledge
for the
workplace.
2.1 Describe sources of
information for the
workplace
2.2 Describe sources of
knowledge for the
workplace
2M1 Evaluate the
advantages and
limitations of sources
of information for the
workplace
2M2 Evaluate the
advantages and
limitations of sources
of knowledge for the
workplace
3. Understand
the
importance
of using
current,
valid and
reliable
information
and
knowledge
in the
workplace.
3.1 Explain the need for
current, valid and
reliable information
and knowledge in the
workplace
3.2 Describe how
information and
knowledge can be
tested and validated
in the workplace
before use
3D1 Evaluate the
advantages and
limitations of a
range of methods
of testing and
validating
information and
knowledge in the
workplace

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Indicative Content
1. Understand the management of information and knowledge in the workplace
Ways to share information and knowledge: talking; socialising; collaboration; teamwork;
encouragement of dialogues; asking for feedback and questions; asking for insight; meetings;
training; coaching; mentoring; flow of information through chain of command; reducing cultural or
physical barriers to communication; acknowledge individual contributions; establish channels for
cross-functional communication
Ways to look after information and knowledge: physically, electronically; CRM; data on computer
systems; access at different levels for different people; amendment and destruction of information
Links and differences between information and knowledge
2. Understand the sources of information and knowledge for the workplace
Sources of information (Internal and external)
Primary vs Secondary
Qualitative Vs Quantitative
Past data
Past records
Performance records
Financial records
KPI’s
Performance reviews
Internet
Third party data houses etc.
Sources of knowledge (Internal and external)
Primary vs Secondary
Qualitative Vs Quantitative
Meetings
Forums
Presentations

4. Understand
information
legislation
and best
practice for
managing
workplace
information.
4.1 Analyse in-house
policies, procedures
and best practice
principles applicable
to the creation or
collection, sharing
and looking after of
information in the
workplace
4.2 Describe key
legislation applicable
to the creation or
collection, sharing
and looking after of
information in the
workplace

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Critical incidents
Problem solving activities
Kaizen and Quality Improvement Initiatives
Improvement teams
Staff questionnaires
Staff undertaking specific roles
Capacity, efficiency, productivity
Financial recording and stand costing etc.
Advantages and limitations of information and knowledge sources
Cost
Currency
Validity
Reliability/accuracy
Bias
Relevance
3. Understand the importance of using current, valid, reliable information and knowledge in the
workplace
Importance of and need for current, valid and reliable information and knowledge in the workplace
Impact on decision making at operational and strategic levels
Impact on organisational performance and the meeting of strategic ambitions, aim and objectives
Testing and validating information: run through business cases; usability testing, case models;
check with experts; check with stakeholders; check authorisation of information; keep records; track
outcomes of validated information, confirm information
Tools, techniques and methods available to test the currency, validity and reliability of information
and knowledge
Simple probability
Normal distribution curve
Straight line
Control Charts
Trend analysis.
4. Understand information legislation and best practice for managing workplace information
In house data management, security and confidentiality policies and procedures
Data Processors and Data Controllers
Best practice principles for information and knowledge management
Legislation e.g. in UK: Data Protection Act, GDPR
Confidentiality
Security
ICO
Preventing, managing and reporting breaches of confidentiality and security breaches
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Managing Operations
Unit aims Learners will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the role and
importance of operations management in organisations. They will assess
the importance of an efficient and effective production process for goods and
services.
Unit level 4
Unit code R/617/1218
GLH 60
Credit value 15
Unit Grading
Structure
Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance The work must demonstrate that learners have achieved the learning
outcomes at the standards stated by each of the assessment criteria.
Learners must use exemplars to illustrate the points which are made. There
is a requirement to utilise information from specific organisations to meet
some of the stated standards and learners may need guidance with the
choices made.
Learning Outcomes.
The Learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand
operations
management
1.1 Analyse why
effective
operations
management is
important for
organisations
1.2 Discuss
techniques for
planning
business
operations
1.3 Evaluate
approaches to
operations
management
and the role
managers play
2. Understand the
relationship
between
operations and
performance
2.1 Discuss the
process model
and performance
objectives used in
managing
operations
2.2 Evaluate the
issue of quality for
business
operations
2M1 Assess the
significance of the
performance
objectives that
underpin
operations
management
2D1 Evaluate, by using
a process model, how a
specific organisation
manages its operations

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3. Understand
techniques to make
operational
management
decisions
3.1 Discuss
techniques that a
specific
organisation uses
when making
operational
management
decisions
3.2 Discuss
operational
outcomes for a
specific
organisation to
facilitate
operational
management
decisions
3.3 Assess the
usefulness of
network plans for
a specific
organisation,
when making
operational
management
decisions
3M1Analyse how to
review the
implementation of
operations
management in a
specific
organisation
3D1 Justify the use of
critical path
analysis for a
specific
organisation when
making operational
management
decisions

Indicative Content
1. Understand Operations Management
Operations Function
Management of resources for production of goods
Management of resources for the delivery of goods or services
Impact of environmental and ethical issues
Role of the supply chain
Operations Management Techniques
Processes – input-transformation-output process
Business process modelling
Lean production techniques
Integration of the supply chain
Just in Time
Use of Economic Order Quantities
Ensuring strategy and vision drive operational processes required
Project planning and control
Risk management
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Operations Processes – Four V’s
Volume
Variety
Variation
Visibility
2. Understand the relationship between operations and performance
Operations Management Performance Objectives (5 key objectives)
Cost
Dependability
Flexibility
Quality
Speed
Quality Control
Importance of accurate data linked to reporting systems and processes
Web analytics
Qualitative and quantitative metrics
Data on purchase orders
Location of business
Capacity
Stock management
Total Quality Management (TQM)
Process Models
Waterfall Model
Incremental Development Model
Spiral Model
V Model
3. Understand techniques to make operational management decisions
Techniques
Implementation review; identifying when and how to review and the links to reporting processes
and future actions
Linear programming
Critical Path Analysis
Flow charts
Network planning
Six Sigma
Lean Principles
Network Plans and Critical Path Analysis
Prepare a net diagram from data given in a Gantt chart or table
Complete EST and LFT entries for nodes
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Calculate float time for a given activity
Determine the shortest time in which a project can be completed
Identify a critical path
Analyse a network diagram
Evaluate the usefulness of critical path as a decision-making tool
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Managing Quality
Unit aims Learners will gain an understanding of the concepts of quality, quality
control, quality assurance and quality management. They will review this in
the context of an organisation considering how to apply principles of quality
management.
Unit level 4
Unit code Y/617/1155
GLH 60
Credit value 15
Unit Grading
Structure
Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance The work must demonstrate that learners have achieved the learning
outcomes at the standards stated by each of the assessment criteria.
Learners must use exemplars to illustrate the points which are made. There
is a requirement to utilise information from specific organisations to meet
some of the stated standards
Learning Outcomes.
The Learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Understand
approaches to
quality management
in organisations
1.1 Evaluate
theories of
quality
management
used by
organisations
1.2 Compare the
effectiveness of
approaches to
quality
management
used by different
organisations
1.3 Discuss the
need for
continuous
improvement in
organisations
1D1Evaluate the
impact of external
factors on quality
management in
organisations
2. Investigate the
importance of
quality control
and quality
assurance
systems to
organisations
2.1 Differentiate
between quality
control and
quality
assurance
2.2 Discuss how a
specific
organisation
uses quality
control systems
2M1 Evaluate the impact
on organisations of
failing to maintain
and improve quality
2D1 Review systems
and suggest
modifications that
could improve
quality in a given
organisation

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3. Understand the
impact of
organisational
performance
and culture on
quality
management
3.1 Assess the role
of self
assessment in
determining an
organisation’s
current
performance
3.2 Analyse the
impact of
organisational
culture on
quality
management
3.3 Discuss how
organisational
culture may be
changed to
ensure effective
quality
management
3M1 Evaluate the need
for staff consultation
when implementing
a quality
management system
and describe the
consultation
processes that could
be used.

Indicative Content
1. Understand approaches to quality management in organisations
Approaches / Theories
Deming
Juran
Feigenbaum
Crosby
Ishikawa
Practical Applications in Organisations
Quality planning
Quality control
Continuous quality improvement
Self-assessment
Communication channels
Macro issues of theory and prescription
Continuous Improvement
Ensuring customer needs, wants and aspirations are met
Identification of quality gaps
Contrasting needs of internal and external customers
External inspections
Organisational need e.g. business development, bottom line, updating
External Factors
Policy – regulations
Legal requirements
Technology – cost/access to appropriate technology
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2. Investigate the importance of quality control and quality assurance systems to organisations
Quality Systems
Mass production and mass inspection
Quality systems for goods v quality systems for services
Quality accreditation, for example, BS 5750, ISO 9002, EN 29000, Chartermark, Citizen’s Charter,
Investors in People
Quality Assurance
Pro-active managerial tool
Responsibility of the whole workforce
Process orientated
Focuses on prevention
Occurs before and during processes
Quality Control
Reactive and corrective tool
Product orientated
Focuses on identification and correction of components or products that fall below standards
Carried out to ensure products meet the specification, function correctly, are free of defects.
Quality Management Systems
Six Sigma
Zero Defects
Total Quality Management (TQM)
International Quality Standards
Benchmarking.
Impacts on business organisations of failing to maintain and improve quality
Loss of customers and clients
Damage to business reputation
Increased costs
Legal implications
Effect on staff morale
Modifications / Service Systems
Service improvements
Concepts applications
Documentation
Administrative processes
Application of standards for monitoring, feedback and review
Action on improvements
Performance indicators
Response times
3. Understand the impact of organisational performance and culture on quality management
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Self-assessment
Validity of process – subjective nature and bias
One dimensional
Comparison – with past performance / against competition / against benchmarks or industry
standards
Culture
Language
Religion
Values
Attitudes
Customs
Education
Infrastructure
Work attitudes
Staff consultation
Setting the scene
Rationale for review
Processes involved
Needs, requirements and commitment from employee
Communication and reporting mechanisms between management and employees
Ensuring the team are updated and engaged
Implementation, feedback and review
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Learning
outcomes
The learner will:
Assessment criteria
The learner can:
Pass Merit Distinction
1. Understand a
range of digital
communications
technologies
1.1 Explain the
differences between
analog and digital
communications
1.2 Evaluate new and
emerging trends in
digital
communications
technologies
1M1 Evaluate the use
of digital
communications
technologies in a
named
organisation
2. Understand the
impact of digital
communications
within different
environments
2.1 Explain how digital
communications have
impacted on
communications
procedures within the
workplace
2.2 Analyse the societal
impact of digital
communications tools
2.3 Discuss the impact of
digital
communications
technology on oral
and written
communications
2D1 Analyse end user
opinions on the
impact of digital
communications on
their job roles and
the working
environment

 

Digital Communications
Unit aims This unit aims to develop knowledge and understanding of digital
communications technology. It examines a range of concepts that
explore digital communications and the impact they have on
organisations and society.
Unit level 4
Unit code D/617/1139
GLH 60
Credit value 15
Unit grading structure Pass, Merit and Distinction
Assessment guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which
demonstrates achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards
provided by the assessment criteria.
Learners will be expected to research new and emerging trends in digital
communications technologies providing examples to illustrate the points
made. In addition, learners will explore the impact that digital
technologies have on society and within the workplace. Issues such as
accessibility, security and portability will also be addressed. Learners will
be required to have a knowledge and understanding of blogging
software, digital content and social networking.

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3. Understand
issues of
accessibility,
security and
portability in
digital
communications
3.1 Assess the barriers
that exist in terms of
accessibility to digital
communications
3.2 Discuss how
individuals and
organisations can
protect themselves
against digital
communications
security threats
3.3 Assess the
importance of
portability as a factor
of digital
communications
growth
3D1 Analyse issues
with a breach of
digital security in a
named
organisation and
the action taken
4. Understand
blogging, digital
content
management
and social
networking
platforms
4.1 Explain the use of
blogging software
4.2 Discuss the features
of content
management
4.3 Outline the benefits
and drawbacks of
using social
networking platforms
4M1 Evaluate the
design of a blog
and identify how
it could be
improved

Indicative Content
1 Understand a range of digital communications technologies
Analog and digital communications: How analog waves are recorded as opposed to being sampled
and converted into a digital format. Advantages of sustainability and longevity of digital formats.
Digital communications examples: Provide examples of different types of digital communications.
Some examples include: email, video conferencing, Skype, instant messaging, text messaging and
mobile phones.
New and emerging trends: Virtual environments for research, teaching and learning. Interactive
workspaces and virtual offices. The growth in mobile workers and changes to traditional work
environments. Examples include: Ambient Knowledge, Immersive Technology and Bürolandschaft
(office landscaping to accommodate mobile workers).
2 Understand the impact of digital communications within different environments
Digital communications in the workplace: How digital media has streamlined certain office
procedures such as invoicing and payments, digital marketing tools, meetings and collaborative
software and on-line trading via e-commerce facilities.
Societal impact: Greater choice and flexibility in terms of consumer buying power and breaking
down barriers associated with supply and demand of goods and services. Enhanced global
communications, bringing people together through email, Skype, Facebook, Messenger, Twitter,
Snap Chat and other digital media applications. Isolation of vulnerable groups such as children
and teenagers as they become more dependant on digital communications in oppose to face-toface interaction. Health and well-being issues of becoming more insular and less mobile.

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Written and oral communications: use of texting and emojis. Move away from formal English
language and phrases to more informal styles of communication. Decline of more traditional written
formats such as letter writing, with more modern methods such as emails.
3 Understand issues of accessibility, security and portability in digital communications
Barriers: Cost – need to constantly upgrade to new faster machines and devices, operating
systems and storage. Limited by geography and networks, access to wi-fi and the internet. Some
sectors of society still lack technological skills and knowledge to understand how to use the
required hardware, software and applications. Time zones still an issue for virtual meetings across
different continents. Resistance to change within a workforce due to fear of being replaced by
technology and making job roles redundant.
Security threats: Protection of mobile devices with anti-virus software, passwords and log-in
shields. Advancements in terms of voice recognition to access secure data and passkeys for
banking. Use of payment systems such as PayPal in oppose to typing in bank details onto a
mobile device. Network security, firewalls, administrators, IT policies, download and portable
device restrictions in organisations to combat potential security threats
Portability and growth: Assess the importance of having digital communications ‘on the go’. The
need to be available 24/7. The impact of accessibility and expectation of being available 24/7. No
defined barriers between work-life and social-life with constant notifications, updates, emails and
software accessibility on portable devices such as mobile phones.
Portability: The ability to work from any location including home or whilst travelling thus saving time
and transport costs. Being able to work easily and more flexibly with people in different time
zones, creating a 24/7 productive environment.
Breach of digital security: Unauthorised access to data, applications, services, networks and/or
devices by bypassing underlying security mechanisms. Sensitive, protected or confidential data is
copied, transmitted, viewed, stolen or used by an individual unauthorised to do so
4 Understand blogging, digital content management and social networking platforms
Blogging software: Blogging tools such as: WordPress, Wix, Yola, Tumblr or Contentful etc.
Blogging evaluation: Comment on the layout, content and design. Is the blog ‘fit for purpose’? Is it
appealing in terms of audience views, does it allow comments, is it updated regularly?
Content management: Discuss the features in terms of what content management is and does.
Understand the processing and technologies that supports the collection, managing, and
publishing of information. Explanation of how it becomes ‘digital content’.
Social media platforms: Drawbacks to include issues of spam, privacy and cyber-bullying. In
addition to security threats, viruses and hackers. Other issues related to costs and the global social
divide between countries that do and do not have access.
Benefits to include global communication networks, developments and advancements in teaching,
learning and innovation.

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Cultural Perspectives
Unit aims This unit provides learners with an introduction to the concepts of cultural
intelligence and its impact on individuals and organisations. Learners will
gain knowledge and understanding of culture, ethics and globalisation and
how they impact on the business environment.
Unit level 4
Unit code K/617/1225
GLH 60
Credit value 15
Unit grading
structure
Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment
guidance
In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which
demonstrates achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards
provided by the assessment criteria. Learners will need to research culture
in specific organisations.
Learning outcomes.
The learner will:
Assessment criteria.
The learner can:
Pass Merit Distinction
1. Understand
culture, cultural
theories and
global issues in
an
interconnected
world
1.1 Compare cultural
theories
1.2 Assess the impact
of culture on
individuals and
organisations in a
global context
1D1 Evaluate the
impact of
culture on
leadership
for a chosen
organisation
2. Understand
ethics, values,
and decision
making criteria
when
promoting
positive
intercultural
relations
2.1 Assess the
importance of
ethics for a
chosen
organisation
2.2 Analyse the
impact of values
on decisions to
promote positive
intercultural
relations
2M1 Assess the range of
policies and
processes used by
organisations to
remove bias
2D1 Compare
management
styles in
different
cultures
3. Understand
cultural
frameworks,
contemporary
issues and
globalisation in
a business
environment
3.1 Explain the
concept of
globalisation
3.2 Compare forms of
global citizenship
3.3 Assess the impact
of cultural
frameworks on
decision making
3M1 Analyse the impact
of global expansion
on the culture of an
organisation
4. Be able to
identify own
cultural
assumptions
4.1 Assess own
cultural
assumptions and
perspectives

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Indicative content
1. Understand culture, cultural theories and global issues in an interconnected world
The definitions, concepts and application of the following: Introduction to Culture, Cultural
Intelligence, Cultural theories (Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions Model), Leadership and Cultural
Awareness, Engaging with Another Culture
2. Understand ethics, values, and decision-making criteria when promoting positive intercultural relations
The definitions, concepts and application of the following: The Personal Side of Culture: Rituals,
Religion, and Family, Intercultural Communication: Words and Meaning, Applying Cultural
Intelligence to Work and Life
Application of the following: Eastern and western approaches to business ethics, organisational
approaches impacting ethical decision making, leadership characteristics impacting ethical
decision making, the principles of corporate social responsibility, the triple bottom line
3. Understand cultural frameworks, contemporary issues and globalisation in a business environment
Application of appropriate cultural frameworks and interdisciplinary, global perspectives in
addressing contemporary issues – Global Citizenship: Ethics and Values, Global Citizenship and
Education, Global Health
Contemporary historical context: Global Society in a Post Cold-War World; Origins, concept and
theory of globalisation; Factors driving globalisation, Strategic complexities of operating in a global
environment
4. Be able to identify own cultural assumptions and perspectives
Continued review and reflection of one’s own cultural assumptions and perspectives in relationship
to others in order to build meaningful intercultural relations and become an effective global citizen.
Reflection on methods used, challenges faced, new learning, skills and knowledge used to enable
progress, skills and knowledge gap, personal learning and development.

and
perspectives
4.2 Analyse the
impact of own
cultural
assumptions and
perspectives on
personal
behaviour

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Applied Statistics
Unit aims The unit aims to provide learners with an introduction to applied statistics.
The learners will learn numerical and algebraic methods before using these
techniques to process data and design an investigation using inferential
testing.
Unit level 4
Unit code R/617/1140
GLH 60
Credit value 15
Unit Grading
Structure
Pass-Merit-Distinction
Assessment Guidance In order to achieve this unit learners must produce work which demonstrates
achievement of the learning outcomes at the standards provided by the
assessment criteria. This unit has a clear practical focus with all learning
outcomes requiring learners to ‘be able to’ do what is stated.
Learning Outcomes.
The Learner will:
Assessment Criteria
The learner can:
P M D
1. Be able to use
numerical and
algebraic
methods
1.1 Complete problem
solving tasks
involving ratios and
proportion
1.2 Demonstrate the
use of algebraic
expressions,
formulae and
equations
1.3 Prepare and
interpret graphs of
algebraic
equations
1D1Analyse the
application of
numerical and
algebraic methods
in a range of
organisational
functions
2. Be able to
collect, process
and interpret
data
2.1 Describe sampling
techniques
2.2 Select a sample
using an
appropriate
technique to test a
specified
hypothesis
2.3 Process and
interpret sample
data using
parametric and
non-parametric
hypothesis
statistical
techniques
2M1 Present orally
results of statistical
tests in non
technical language

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3. Be able to
design an
investigation
with appropriate
inferential
testing
3.1 Develop a
hypothesis and null
hypothesis
3.2 Present sample
based results to
meet reader
requirements
3.3 Complete
inferential testing
of the given
hypotheses
3M1 Make justified
statistical
conclusions from the
completed
investigation
3D1 Evaluate the
success of the
designed
investigation in
validating stated
conclusions

Indicative Content
1. Be able to use numerical and algebraic methods
Problem-solving tasks involving ratios and proportion
Four rules of number
Negative numbers
Hierarchy and order of operations
Decimal places and significant numbers
Fractions, Decimals and Percentages
Factors, multiples, common factors
Prime numbers and prime factor decomposition
Reduce ratios to their simplest form
Interpret scales
Algebraic expressions, formulae and equations
Expand and factorise quadratic expressions
Manipulate expressions and formulae (to include both linear and quadratic expressions)
Prepare and interpret graphs of algebraic equations
Plot graphs of linear and quadratic equations
Calculation of gradient
Calculation of the intercept of a linear graph
Solve simultaneous and quadratic equations from a graph
Uses of numerical and algebraic methods to a range of business organisations
Costing
Inventory Valuation
Budgeting
Incomplete accounting records
Staffing requirements
Payroll
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2. Understand how to collect, process and interpret data
Sampling Techniques
Simple Random Sampling (SRS)
Stratified Sampling
Cluster Sampling
Systematic Sampling
Multistage Sampling
Data Collection Methods
Interviews
Questionnaires and Surveys
Observations
Focus Groups
Ethnographies, Oral History, and Case Studies
Documents and Records
Statistical techniques
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
Correlation
Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient
Factor analysis
Regression analysis
Non-parametric hypothesis tests, for example:
The nature and use of Chi squared test
The Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests
Wilcoxon signed-rank tests
Parametric hypothesis tests, for example:
o The nature and use of Student t-Test
o The nature and use of the z-Test
Understanding of and ability to use statistical packages to aid computation
3. Be able to design an investigation with appropriate inferential testing
Hypothesis and null hypothesis
Nature of a hypothesis test
One-tail test
Two-tail tests
Application of a ‘null hypothesis’ and ‘alternative hypothesis’
Use of ‘significance level’, ‘rejection region’ (or ‘critical region’), ‘acceptance region’ and
‘test statistic’ during the investigation.
Presentation of results
Tables
Graphs
Charts
Reports
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Inferential testing
Choice of sampling method to obtain a representative sample
Research design
Research aim
Level of measurement – nominal, ordinal and interval levels
Inferential Testing methods to meet the needs of task.