affected by the COVID-19 pandemic

TO OUR STOCKHOLDERS
I am pleased to report that 2021 represented our 29th consecutive record year of increased net sales. Despite the
COVID-19 pandemic, net sales rose to $5.5 billion in 2021 from $4.6 billion in 2020.
These unprecedented times continue to present unique and different challenges to all of us. Our deepest sympathies
go out to all those who have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Our top priority remains the health, safety
and well–being of our employees, customers, consumers and our communities. We are continuing to monitor and
reassess our business operations in accordance with guidance from public health authorities and other professionals.
Monster Energy Cares, our philanthropic arm, continues to be actively engaged in a number of philanthropic efforts
including efforts related to the COVID-19 pandemic globally.
Our production and distribution activities have remained in operation and our products remain available for sale at
retail establishments. We continue to address certain supply chain challenges that have arisen, and plan for those
that could arise in the future. We are continuing to work with our suppliers, co-packers, bottlers and distributors to
ensure our products are produced and available for sale to our consumers.
We have continued to innovate in the energy drink category throughout the extended period of the COVID-19
pandemic. In 2021, we launched a number of new beverages in the United States, as well as in our international
markets. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, we accelerated our innovation pipeline including the development and
launch of our new True North® Pure Energy Seltzer brand, that is positioned differently from our existing portfolio
of energy drinks.
We are also excited by our recent acquisition of CANarchy Craft Brewery Collective, LLC, a craft beer and hard
seltzer company. In addition to the exciting brands this company owns, it provides us with an established platform
for future growth in the alcoholic beverage sector through CANarchy’s existing brands as well as innovative new
products that are under development.
We plan to launch new and exciting beverages during 2022.
Our Monster Energy® brand, most of our Strategic Brands, Reign and our True North® brand participate in the
premium segment of the energy drink category. Our Monster Energy® drinks are now sold in approximately 141
countries and territories globally and our Strategic Brands, comprised primarily of the various energy drink brands
we acquired from The Coca-Cola Company in 2015, are now sold in approximately 66 countries and territories
globally. Our Reign Total Body Fuel® high performance energy drinks are sold in 22 countries and territories and
our True North® Pure Energy Seltzers are sold in the United States and Canada. Our affordable energy brands,
comprised primarily of Predator® and Fury®, participate in the affordable segment of the energy drink category
and are sold in 30 countries and territories globally. One or more of our energy drinks are now distributed in
approximately 155 countries and territories worldwide.
I would like to express my gratitude for the support and leadership shown by Mr. Hilton Schlosberg, my Co-Chief
Executive Officer, and would also like to express my gratitude for the direction and guidance provided by our
executive leadership and our senior management team.
We extend our personal thanks to our consumers, customers, bottlers and distribution partners as well as to our
suppliers for their continued support. To our Board of Directors, executive leadership, management and employees,
our sincere thanks and appreciation for all your efforts, which are evidenced by our continued success. To our
stockholders, thank you for the trust you have placed in us and in our management team. We have successfully
navigated through an extremely challenging year, and while we still face similar challenges, we look forward to the
future with confidence.
Sincerely,
Rodney C. Sacks
Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer
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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-K
(Mark One)
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF
THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021
OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF
THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from _____ to _____
Commission file number 001-18761
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
47-1809393
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

1 Monster Way
Corona, California 92879
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (951) 739 – 6200
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.005 par value per share MNST Nasdaq Global Select Market
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes
No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the
Exchange Act. Yes
No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required
to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes
No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be
submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such
shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes
No
3
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer,
a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,”
“smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

Large accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer
Accelerated filer
Smaller reporting company
Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition
period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the
Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of
the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C.
7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.).
Yes
No
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant was
$43,749,615,959 computed by reference to the closing sale price for such stock on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on June
30, 2021, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.
The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.005 par value per share (being the only class of common
stock of the registrant), outstanding on February 16, 2022 was 529,358,860 shares.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:
Portions of the registrant’s Definitive Proxy Statement to be filed subsequent to the date hereof with the Commission pursuant to
Regulation 14A in connection with the registrant’s 2022 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this
Report. Such Definitive Proxy Statement will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission no later than 120 days after the
conclusion of the registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2021.
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MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION
FORM 10-K
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Item Number Page Number
PART I

 

1. Business 6
1A. Risk Factors 21

 

1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 40
2. Properties 40

3. Legal Proceedings 40
4. Mine Safety Disclosures 41
PART II
5. Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer
Purchases of Equity Securities 41
6. [Reserved] 42
7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of
Operations 42
7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 63
8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 64
9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial
Disclosure 64
9A. Controls and Procedures 64
9B. Other Information 67
9C. Disclosures Regarding Foreign Jurisdictions that Prevent Inspections 67
PART III
10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 67
11. Executive Compensation 67
12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related
Stockholder Matters 67
13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 68
14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 68
PART IV
15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules 68
16. Form 10-K Summary 68
Signatures 71

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PART I
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
When this report uses the words “the Company”, “we”, “us” and “our”, these words refer to Monster
Beverage Corporation and its subsidiaries, unless the context otherwise requires. Based in Corona, California,
Monster Beverage Corporation is a holding company and conducts no operating business, except through its
consolidated subsidiaries. The Company’s subsidiaries primarily develop and market energy drinks.
Overview
We develop, market, sell and distribute energy drink beverages and concentrates for energy drink
beverages, primarily under the following brand names:
Monster Energy®
Monster Energy Ultra®
Monster Rehab®
Monster Energy®Nitro
Java Monster®
Muscle Monster®
Espresso Monster®
Punch Monster®
Juice Monster®
Monster Hydro® Energy Water
Monster Hydro® Super Sport
Monster HydroSport Super Fuel®
Monster Super Fuel®
Monster Dragon Tea®
Reign Total Body Fuel®
Reign Inferno® Thermogenic Fuel
NOS®
Full Throttle®
Burn®
Mother®
Nalu®
Ultra Energy®
Play® and Power Play® (stylized)
Relentless®
BPM®
BU®
Gladiator®
Samurai®
Live+®
Predator®
Fury®
True North®
Industry Overview
The “alternative” beverage category combines non-carbonated, ready-to-drink iced teas, lemonades, juice
cocktails, single-serve juices and fruit beverages, ready-to-drink dairy and coffee drinks, energy drinks, sports
drinks and single-serve still waters (flavored, unflavored and enhanced) with “new age” beverages, including sodas
that are considered natural, sparkling juices and flavored sparkling beverages. According to Beverage Marketing
Corporation, domestic U.S. wholesale sales in 2021 for the “alternative” beverage category of the market are
estimated at approximately $67.0 billion, representing an increase of approximately 11.4% over estimated domestic
U.S. wholesale sales in 2020 of approximately $60.1 billion.
Reportable Segments
We have three operating and reportable segments, (i) Monster Energy® Drinks segment (“Monster
Energy® Drinks”), which is primarily comprised of our Monster Energy® drinks, Reign Total Body Fuel® high
performance energy drinks and True North® Pure Energy Seltzers, (ii) Strategic Brands segment (“Strategic
Brands”), which is comprised primarily of the various energy drink brands acquired from The Coca-Cola Company
(“TCCC”) in 2015 as well as our affordable energy brands, and (iii) Other segment (“Other”), which is comprised
of certain products sold by American Fruits and Flavors LLC (“AFF”), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company,
to independent third-party customers (the “AFF Third-Party Products”).

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Our Monster Energy® Drinks segment primarily generates net operating revenues by selling ready-to-drink
packaged energy drinks primarily to bottlers and full service beverage distributors. In some cases, we sell directly
to retail grocery and specialty chains, wholesalers, club stores, mass merchandisers, convenience chains, drug
stores, foodservice customers, value stores, e-commerce retailers and the military.
Our Strategic Brands segment primarily generates net operating revenues by selling “concentrates” and/or
“beverage bases” to authorized bottling and canning operations. Such bottlers generally combine the concentrates
and/or beverage bases with sweeteners, water and other ingredients to produce ready-to-drink packaged energy
drinks. The ready-to-drink packaged energy drinks are then sold to other bottlers, full service distributors or
retailers, including, retail grocery and specialty chains, wholesalers, club stores, mass merchandisers, convenience
chains, foodservice customers, drug stores, value stores, e-commerce retailers and the military. To a lesser extent,
our Strategic Brands segment generates net operating revenues by selling certain ready-to-drink packaged energy
drinks to bottlers and full service beverage distributors.
Generally, the Monster Energy® Drinks segment generates higher per case net operating revenues, but
lower per case gross profit margin percentages than the Strategic Brands segment.
For certain risks with respect to our energy drinks see “Part I, Item 1A – Risk Factors” below.
Corporate History
In the 1930s, Hubert Hansen and his sons started a business selling fresh non-pasteurized juices in Los
Angeles, California. In 1977, Tim Hansen, one of the grandsons of Hubert Hansen, perceived a demand for shelf
stable pasteurized natural juices and juice blends and formed Hansen Foods, Inc. (“HFI”). HFI expanded its product
line from juices to include Hansen’s Natural Soda® brand sodas. In 1990, California Co-Packers Corporation (d/b/a
Hansen Beverage Company) (“CCC”) acquired certain assets of HFI, including the right to market the Hansen’s®
brand name. In 1992, Hansen Natural Corporation acquired the Hansen’s® brand natural soda and apple juice
business from CCC. Under our ownership, the Hansen’s® beverage business significantly expanded to include a
wide range of beverages within the growing “alternative” beverage category including, in particular, energy drinks.
In 2012, we changed our name from Hansen Natural Corporation to Monster Beverage Corporation. In 2015, we
acquired various energy brands from TCCC and disposed of our non-energy drink business. In 2016, we completed
our acquisition of flavor supplier and long-time business partner AFF.
CANarchy Acquisition
On February 17, 2022, we completed our acquisition of CANarchy Craft Brewery Collective LLC
(“CANarchy”), a craft beer and hard seltzer company, for $330.0 million in cash, subject to adjustments. The
transaction allows us to enter the alcohol beverage sector and brings the Cigar City family of brands including Jai
Alai IPA and Florida Man IPA, the Oskar Blues family of brands including Dale’s Pale Ale and Wild Basin Hard
Seltzers, the Deep Ellum family of brands including Dallas Blonde and Deep Ellum IPA, the Perrin Brewing family
of brands including Black Ale, the Squatters family of brands including Hop Rising Double IPA and Juicy IPA and
the Wasatch family of brands including Apricot Hefeweizen to our beverage portfolio. The transaction does not
include CANarchy’s stand-alone restaurants. Our organizational structure for our existing energy beverage business
will remain unchanged. CANarchy will function independently, retaining its own organizational structure and team.
2021 Product Introductions
During 2021, we continued to expand our existing energy drink portfolio by adding additional products to
our portfolio in a number of countries and further developed our distribution markets. During 2021, we sold the
following new products to our customers:
BPM® Mango
Fury® Mean Green
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Monster® (stylized) Reserve Watermelon
Monster® (stylized) Reserve White Pineapple
Monster Energy® Super Cola® (Japan)
Monster Energy® Ultra Gold®
Monster Hydro® Energy Water Watermelon
Monster Hydro® Super SportTM Killer KiwiTM
Monster Hydro® Super SportTM Macho MangoTM
Rehab® Monster® Strawberry Lemonade
Mother® Zero Sugar Razzle Berry
Nalu® Hibiscus Rooibos
Play® Zero Raspberry
Predator® Malt Smash
Predator® Mango Mayhem
Predator® Spicy Ginger
Predator® Tropical
Reign Inferno® Thermogenic Fuel Watermelon Warlord
Reign Total Body Fuel® Cherry Limeade
Reign Total Body Fuel® White Gummy Bear
True North® Pure Energy Seltzer Black Cherry
True North® Pure Energy Seltzer Cucumber Lime
True North® Pure Energy Seltzer Grapefruit Lemonade
True North® Pure Energy Seltzer Mandarin Yuzu
True North® Pure Energy Seltzer Watermelon Mist
True North® Pure Energy Seltzer White Peach Pear
In the normal course of business, we discontinue certain products and/or product lines. Those products or
product lines discontinued in 2021, either individually or in aggregate, did not have a material adverse impact on
our financial position, results of operations or liquidity.
Products – Monster Energy® Drinks Segment
Monster Energy® Drinks – a line of carbonated energy drinks. Our Monster Energy® drinks contain
vitamins, minerals, nutrients, herbs and other ingredients (collectively, “supplement ingredients”). We offer the
following energy drinks under the Monster Energy® drink product line: Monster Energy®, Lo-Carb Monster
Energy®, Monster Assault®, Monster Energy® Fury®, Juice Monster® Aussie Style Lemonade
TM, Juice
Monster® Khaos®, Juice Monster® Khaotic®, Juice Monster® Mango Loco®, Juice Monster® Pacific Punch®,
Juice Monster® Papillon
TM, Juice Monster® Pipeline Punch®, Juice Monster® Ripper®, Monster® Mango Loco,
Monster Energy® Zero Sugar, Monster Energy® Import, Monster Energy® Export, M3(stylized)®, Monster
Energy® Super Concentrate, Monster Mule®, Monster Cuba Libre®, Monster Energy Zero Ultra®, Monster
Energy Ultra Black®, Monster Energy Ultra Blue®, Monster Energy Ultra Citron®, Monster Energy Ultra Fiesta®
Mango, Monster Energy® Ultra Gold®, Monster Energy Ultra Paradise®, Monster Energy® Ultra Peachy Keen®,
Monster Energy Ultra Red®, Monster Energy Ultra Rosa®, Monster Energy Ultra Sunrise®, Monster Energy Ultra
Violet®, Monster Energy Ultra® Watermelon, Monster Energy® Mixxd Punch, Monster Energy® Valentino Rossi,
Monster Energy® Lewis Hamilton 44, Monster Energy® Super Cola® (Japan), Monster® (stylized) Reserve
Watermelon and Monster® (stylized) Reserve White Pineapple.
Espresso Monster® Espresso + Energy Drinks – a line of non-carbonated dairy based espresso + energy
drinks. We offer the following espresso + energy drinks under the Espresso Monster® product line: Espresso and
Milk, Salted Caramel and Vanilla Espresso.

9
Java Monster® Coffee + Energy Drinks – a line of non-carbonated dairy based coffee + energy drinks. We
offer the following coffee + energy drinks under the Java Monster® product line: Java Monster® 300 French
Vanilla, Java Monster® 300 Mocha, Java Monster® Farmer’s Oats, Java Monster® Irish Blend®, Java Monster®
Kona Blend, Java Monster® Loca Moca®, Java Monster® Mean Bean®, Java Monster® Salted Caramel and Java
Monster® Vanilla Light.
Monster Energy® Dragon Iced TeaTM Energy Teas – a line of non-carbonated energy teas. We offer the
following energy teas under the Monster Energy
® Dragon Iced TeaTM product line in different countries: Green
Tea, Peach Tea, Raspberry Tea and Lemon Tea.
Monster Hydro® includes two product lines: Energy Water and Super Sport. Monster Hydro® Energy
Water is a line of non-carbonated, lightly sweetened refreshment + energy drinks. We offer the following
refreshment + energy drinks under the Monster Hydro® Energy Water product line: Blue Ice®, Watermelon®,
Purple Passion®, Tropical Thunder® and Zero Sugar. Monster Hydro® Super Sport is a line of non-carbonated,
lightly sweetened refreshment + energy drinks that features an enhanced electrolyte blend and BCAA’s. We offer
the following refreshment + energy drinks under the Monster Hydro® Super Sport product line: Blue Streak, Killer
Kiwi, Macho Mango and Red Dawg.
Monster HydroSport Super Fuel® Hydration + Energy Drinks – a line of non-carbonated, advanced
hydration + energy drinks with BCAA’s. We offer the following advanced hydration + energy drinks under the
Monster HydroSport Super Fuel® product line: Blue Streak, Charge, Hang Time and Striker.
Monster Energy® Nitro – a line of carbonated energy drinks containing nitrous oxide. We offer the
following energy drink under the Monster Energy® Nitro product line: Super Dry.
Rehab® Monster® Energy Drinks – a line of non-carbonated energy drinks with electrolytes. We offer the
following energy drinks under the Rehab® Monster® product line: Orangeade, Peach Tea, Raspberry Tea,
Strawberry Lemonade, Tea + Lemonade and Watermelon.
Muscle Monster® Energy Shakes – a line of non-carbonated energy shakes containing 27-grams of protein.
We offer the following energy shakes under the Muscle Monster® Energy Shakes product line: Chocolate and
Vanilla.
Reign Total Body Fuel® High Performance Energy Drinks – a line of high performance energy drinks with
BCAA’s, B vitamins, electrolytes and CoQ10 with zero sugar. We offer the following high performance energy
drinks under the Reign Total Body Fuel® product line: Carnival Candy, Cherry Limeade, Lemon Hdz, Lilikoi
Lychee, Mang-O-Matic, Melon Mania, Orange Dreamsicle, Peach Fizz, Razzle Berry, Reignbow Sherbet, Sour
Apple, Strawberry Sublime and White Gummy Bear.
Reign Inferno® Thermogenic Fuel High Performance Energy Drinks – a line of high performance energy
drinks with a thermogenic performance blend in addition to BCAA’s, B vitamins, electrolytes, and CoQ10 with
zero sugar. We offer the following high performance energy drinks under the Reign Inferno® Thermogenic Fuel
product line: Jalapeno Strawberry, Red Dragon, True BLU and Watermelon Warlord.
True North® Pure Energy Seltzers – a line of natural, plant-based energy drinks with an immunity boost,
containing zero sugar, sweeteners, artificial flavors or colors. We offer the following energy seltzers under the True
North® product line: Black Cherry, Cucumber Lime, Grapefruit Lemonade, Mandarin Yuzu, Watermelon Mist and
White Peach Pear.
Products – Strategic Brands Segment
BPM® a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the BPM® product
line: Focus Berry Red, Hydrate Citrus Green,Mango, Sour Twist and Zero Orange.

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BU® a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the BU® product
line: Island Punch and Original.
Burn® – a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the Burn® product
line: Apple Kiwi, Blue, Cherry, Dark Energy, Lemon Ice, Mango, Original, Passion Punch, Peach, Zero Raspberry,
Sour Twist and Zero.
Full Throttle® a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the Full
Throttle® product line: Original (Citrus) and True Blue.
Fury® – a line of affordable carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the
Fury
® product line: Gold Strike and Mean Green.
Gladiator® a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drink under the Gladiator®
product line: Original.
Live+® a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the Live+®
product line: Ascend, Ignite and Persist.
Mother® a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the Mother®
product line: Epic Swell, Frosty Berry, Kicked Apple®, Original, Passion, Sugar Free, Tropical BlastTM and Zero
Sugar Razzle Berry.
Nalu® – a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the Nalu® product
line: Black Tea & Passion Fruit, Exotic, Frost, Green Tea & Ginger,Hibiscus Rooibos, Original, Passion and
Refresh.
NOS® – a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the NOS® product
line: GT Grape, Nitro Mango, Original, Sonic Sour and Turbo.
Play® and Power Play® (stylized) – a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy
drinks under the Play
® and Power Play® (stylized) product line: Apple Kiwi, Mango, Passion Fruit, Original, Sugar
Free and Zero Raspberry.
Predator® – a line of affordable carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the
Predator
® product line: Gold Strike, Malt Smash, Mango Mayhem, Mean Green, Purple Rain, Red Dawn, Spicy
Ginger and Tropical.
Relentless® – a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the
Relentless
® product line: Apple Kiwi, Cherry, Lemon Ice, Mango, Origin, Passion Punch, Sour Twist and Zero.
Samurai® – a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the Samurai®
product line: Fruity and Strawberry.
Ultra Energy® – a line of carbonated energy drinks. We offer the following energy drinks under the Ultra
Energy® product line: Apple Kiwi, Fury, Mango, Original, Passion Punch, Peach Mango and Zero Raspberry.
Products – Other Segment
AFF sells a limited number of products to independent third-party customers.
Other Products
We continue to evaluate and, where considered appropriate, introduce additional products, flavors and types
of beverages to complement our existing product lines. We may also evaluate, and where considered appropriate,

11
introduce additional types of consumer products we consider to be complementary to our existing products and/or
to which our brand names are able to add value.
The Company also sells and/or enters into license agreements that generate revenues associated with thirdparty sales of non-beverage products bearing the Company’s trademarks including, but not limited to, clothing,
backpacks, hats, t-shirts, jackets, helmets and automotive wheels.
Products – Packaging
Our products are packaged in a variety of different package types and sizes including, but not limited to,
aluminum cans, aluminum cap cans, sleek aluminum cans, aluminum cans with re-sealable ends as well as
polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic bottles.
Manufacture and Distribution
AFF develops and manufactures the primary flavors for our Monster Energy® Drinks segment.
We do not operate our own manufacturing facilities for finished goods, but instead outsource the
manufacturing process to third-party bottlers and contract packers.
We purchase flavor ingredients, flavors, concentrates, sweeteners, juices, supplement ingredients, cans,
bottles, caps, labels, trays, boxes and other ingredients for our beverage products from ingredient suppliers, which
are delivered to our various third-party bottlers and co-packers. In some cases, certain common supplies may be
purchased by our various third-party bottlers and co-packers. Depending on the product, the third-party bottlers or
co-packers add filtered water and/or other ingredients (including supplement ingredients) for the manufacture and
packaging of the finished products into our approved containers in accordance with our recipes and formulas.
Depending on the beverage, the bottler/packer may also add carbonation to the products as part of the production
process.
For our Strategic Brands segment, we primarily purchase concentrates and/or beverage bases from
ingredient suppliers, which are then sold to certain of our various third-party bottlers/distributors. The third-party
bottlers/distributors are responsible for the manufacture and packaging of the finished products, including the
procurement of all other required ingredients and packaging materials. For certain limited products in the Strategic
Brands segment, we may purchase flavors, concentrates, sweeteners, juices, supplement ingredients, cans, bottles,
caps, labels, trays, boxes and other ingredients for our Strategic Brand products from our suppliers, which are
delivered to our various third-party bottlers and co-packers. In some cases, certain common supplies may be
purchased by our various third-party bottlers and co-packers. Depending on the product, the third-party bottlers or
co-packers add filtered water and/or other ingredients (including supplement ingredients), for the manufacture and
packaging of the finished products into our approved containers in accordance with our recipes and formulas.
Depending on the beverage, the bottler/co-packer may also add carbonation to the products as part of the production
process.
Co-Packing Arrangements
All of our finished goods are manufactured by various third-party bottlers and co-packers situated
throughout the United States and abroad, under separate arrangements with each party. Our co-packaging
arrangements vary in terms and do not generally obligate us to procure minimum quantities of products within
specified periods.
In some instances, subject to agreement, certain equipment may be purchased exclusively by us and/or
jointly with our co-packers, and installed at their facilities to enable them to produce certain of our products. In
certain cases, such equipment remains our property and is required to be returned to us upon termination of the

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packing arrangements with such co-packers, unless we are reimbursed by the co-packer at the then book value or
via a per-case credit over a pre-determined number of cases that are produced at the facilities concerned.
For our Monster Energy® Drinks segment, we are generally responsible for arranging for the purchase and
delivery to our third-party bottlers and co-packers of the containers in which our beverage products are packaged.
Our products are packaged in a number of locations, both domestically and internationally. As distribution
volumes increase in both our domestic and international markets, we will continue to source additional packing
arrangements.
Our ability to estimate demand for our products is imprecise, particularly with new products, and may be
less precise during periods of rapid growth, particularly in new markets. If we materially underestimate demand for
our products and/or are unable to secure sufficient ingredients or raw materials including, but not limited to,
aluminum cans, aluminum cap cans, sleek aluminum cans, aluminum cans with re-sealable ends, PET plastic
bottles, caps, labels, flavor ingredients, flavors, juice concentrates, coffee, tea, supplement ingredients, other
ingredients and certain sweeteners, and/or procure adequate packing arrangements and/or obtain adequate or timely
shipment of our products, we might not be able to satisfy demand on a short-term basis. (See “Part I, Item 1A –
Risk Factors”).
For most of our products there are limited co-packing facilities in our domestic and international markets
with adequate capacity and/or suitable equipment to package our products. We believe a short disruption or delay
in production would not significantly affect our revenues; however, as alternative co-packing facilities in our
domestic and international markets with adequate long-term capacity may not be available for such products, either
at commercially reasonable rates and/or within a reasonably short time period, if at all, a lengthy disruption or delay
in production of any of such products could significantly affect our revenues.
We continue to actively seek alternative and/or additional co-packing facilities around the world (including
in Africa, Asia, Australia, Central and South America, China, Europe, India, Mexico, the Middle East and the United
States) with adequate capacity and capability for the production of our various products to minimize transportation
costs and transportation-related damages as well as to mitigate the risk of a disruption in production and/or
importation.
Distribution Agreements
During 2021, we continued to expand distribution of our products in both our domestic and international
markets.
Distribution levels vary by product and geographic location. Net sales outside the United States were $2.04
billion, $1.51 billion and $1.33 billion for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Monster Energy® Distribution Agreements
We have entered into agreements with various bottlers/distributors providing for the distribution of our
products during initial terms of up to twenty years, which may be renewed thereafter for additional terms ranging
from one to five years, subject to certain terms and conditions which may vary depending on the form of the
agreement. Such agreements remain in effect for their then-current term as long as our products are being
distributed, but are subject to specified termination rights held by each party, which may include by way of example,
and depending on the form of agreement, termination upon: mutual agreement; material breach of the agreement
by, or an insolvency of, either party; deadlock; change of control; changes in legal or regulatory conditions and
termination of certain related agreements. Additionally, we are entitled to terminate certain distribution agreements
at any time without cause upon payment of a termination fee, including a limited number of distribution agreements
with TCCC network bottlers that were entered into prior to 2015.

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Certain of our material distribution arrangements for our Monster Energy® brand energy drinks, as
amended from time to time, are described below:
(a) Amended and Restated Distribution Coordination Agreement with TCCC, pursuant to which we have
designated, and in the future may designate, subject to TCCC’s approval, territories in Canada and the
United States in which bottlers from TCCC’s network of wholly or partially-owned and independent
bottlers (the “TCCC North American Bottlers”) will distribute and sell, or continue to distribute and sell,
our Monster Energy® brand energy drinks.
(b) Amended and Restated International Distribution Coordination Agreement with TCCC, pursuant to which
we have designated, and in the future may designate, countries, or territories within countries, in which we
wish to appoint TCCC network bottlers to distribute and sell our Monster Energy® brand energy drinks,
subject to TCCC’s approval. In February 2020, the Amended and Restated International Distribution
Coordination Agreement with TCCC was renewed for an additional five-year term.

(c) Additionally, we have entered into distribution agreements for certain of our Monster Energy® products
with various TCCC network bottlers, both in the United States and internationally.

All distribution territories in the United States, and substantially all distribution territories internationally
have been transitioned to TCCC network bottlers/distributors.
Strategic Brands Distribution Agreements
We have entered into distribution coordination agreements with TCCC pursuant to which we have
designated, and in the future may designate, subject to TCCC’s approval, territories in which TCCC network bottlers
will distribute our Strategic Brands energy drinks.
We have entered into agreements with various TCCC network bottlers, both in the United States and
internationally, providing for the distribution and sale of our Strategic Brands energy drinks.
Raw Materials and Suppliers
The principal raw materials used in the manufacturing of our products are aluminum cans, aluminum cap
cans, sleek aluminum cans, aluminum cans with re-sealable ends, PET plastic bottles, caps, as well as flavors, juice
concentrates, glucose, sugar, sucralose, milk, cream, protein, coffee, tea, supplement ingredients and other
packaging materials, the costs of which are subject to fluctuations. As a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic,
we have seen a shift in consumer channel preferences and package configurations, including an increase in at-home
consumption and a decrease in food service on-premise consumption. This shift has resulted in increased industry
demand for aluminum cans, leading to aluminum cans being in short supply.
AFF is the primary flavor supplier for our Monster Energy® brand energy drinks. We also purchase flavors
from other suppliers as well as juices, supplement ingredients, glucose, sugar, sucralose, other sweeteners and other
ingredients from independent suppliers located in the United States and abroad.
For our Strategic Brands energy drinks, we purchase flavors, concentrates and/or beverage bases from
flavor suppliers including TCCC in the United States and abroad, and may purchase certain other ingredients from
independent suppliers located in the United States and abroad.
With regard to our Java Monster®, Espresso Monster® and Muscle Monster® product lines, the dairy,
protein and retort co-packing industries are subject to shortages and increased demand from time to time, which
may result in production disruption and/or higher prices.
For certain flavors purchased from third-party suppliers and used in a limited number of our Monster
Energy® brand energy drinks and/or our Strategic Brands energy drinks, these third-party flavor suppliers own the

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proprietary rights to certain of their flavor formulas. We do not have possession of the list of such flavor ingredients
or formulas used in the production of certain of our products and certain of our blended concentrates, and we may
be unable to obtain comparable flavors or concentrates from alternative suppliers on short notice. Our third-party
flavor suppliers generally do not make such flavors and/or blended concentrates available to other third-party
customers.
We have identified alternative suppliers for many of the ingredients contained in many of our beverages.
However, industry-wide shortages of certain flavor ingredients,flavors, fruits and fruit juices, coffee, tea, dairybased products, supplement ingredients and sweeteners have been, and could from time to time in the future be,
encountered, which could interfere with and/or delay production of certain of our products.
We continually endeavor to develop back-up sources of supply for certain of our flavor ingredients, flavors
and concentrates purchased from third-party suppliers, as well as to negotiate arrangements with our existing
suppliers, which would enable us to obtain access to certain of such concentrates or flavor formulas under certain
circumstances. We have been partially successful in these endeavors. Additionally, in a limited number of cases,
contractual restrictions and/or the necessity to obtain regulatory approvals and licenses may limit our ability to enter
into agreements with alternative suppliers, manufacturers and/or distributors.
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, global inflation, unanticipated increases in demand, labor shortages
and supply chain disruptions, we experienced shortages of certain raw materials, such as aluminum cans and
ingredients, and increased import and operating costs in 2021 and will likely continue to experience such costs in
fiscal year 2022. See “Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of
Operations – Our Distribution and Supply Chain” for more information on such shortages and how we have, and
will continue to, remediate such challenges in our supply chain.
Competition
The beverage industry is highly competitive. The principal areas of competition are pricing, packaging,
development of new products and flavors as well as promotional and marketing strategies. Our products compete
with a wide range of drinks produced by a relatively large number of companies, many of which have substantially
greater financial, marketing and distribution resources than we do.
Important factors affecting our ability to compete successfully include brand and product image, taste and
flavor of products, trade and consumer promotions, rapid and effective development of new and unique cutting edge
products, ingredients, attractive and different packaging, brand exposure and marketing as well as pricing. We also
rely on our bottlers and full service beverage distributors to allocate more attention to our products than those of
our competitors, provide stable and reliable distribution and secure adequate shelf space in retail outlets.
Competitive pressures in the “alternative”, energy, coffee and “functional” beverage categories could cause our
products to maintain or to lose market share or we could experience price erosion, which could materially impact
our business and results of operations.
We have experienced and continue to experience competition from new entrants in the energy drink and
energy shot categories. A number of companies who market and distribute iced teas, coffees, juice cocktails,
enhanced waters and sports drinks in various larger volume packages in glass and plastic bottles (including
BODYARMOR, Vitamin Water, CORE, Arizona, Ocean Spray, Powerade, Gatorade Bolt 24 and Starbucks) and
12- and 16-ounce cans (such as Mountain Dew Kickstart and Game Fuel), have added supplement ingredients to
their products with a view to marketing their products as “functional” or energy beverages or as having “functional”
benefits. We believe that many of those products contain lower levels of supplement ingredients, principally deliver
refreshment and are positioned differently from our energy or “functional” drinks.
We are also subject to increasing levels of regulatory issues including in relation to the registration and/or
taxation of our products in certain new international markets, which may put us at a competitive disadvantage. (See
“Government Regulation” below for additional information).

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We compete not only for consumer preference, but also for maximum marketing, sales efforts and attention
from our multi-brand licensed bottlers, brokers and distributors, many of which have a principal affiliation with
competing companies and brands. Our products compete with all liquid refreshments and in many cases with
products of much larger and in some cases better financed competitors, including the products of numerous
nationally and internationally known producers such as TCCC, PepsiCo, Inc. (“PepsiCo”), Keurig Dr. Pepper Inc.
(“KDP”) and Red Bull GmbH. We also compete with companies that are smaller or primarily local in operation.
Our products also compete with private-label brands such as those carried by grocery store chains, convenience
store chains and club stores.
Domestically, our energy drinks compete directly with Red Bull, Rockstar, MTN Dew Amp, MTN Dew
Kickstart, MTN Dew GameFuel and MTN Dew Energy, G Fuel, Venom, VPX Redline, 5-Hour Energy Shots, MiO
Energy, VPX Bang, V8 + Energy, Uptime, hi*ball, CELSIUS, C4, Alani Nu, 3D Energy, ZOA Energy, Rowdy
Energy, GHOST Energy, Starbucks BAYA energy and many other brands.
In 2020, PepsiCo acquired Rockstar and entered into an agreement with VPX to distribute VPX Bang
products in the United States. PepsiCo also markets and/or distributes additional products in that market segment
such as Pepsi Max, Mountain Dew, MTN Dew Energy, MTN Dew Kickstart and MTN Dew Game Fuel.
Internationally, our energy drinks compete with Red Bull (including non-carbonated Red Bull in China and
Asia), Rockstar, V-Energy, Lucozade, and numerous local and private-label brands that usually differ from country
to country, such as HELL, Amper, Shock, Tiger, Fearless, Boost, TNT, Shark, Dragon, Score, Sting, Hot 6, Suntory
ZONE, Battery, Bullit, Flash Up, Black, Non-Stop, Bomba, Semtex, Vive 100, Dark Dog, Speed, Guarana, M-150,
Lipovitan, Bacchus, Volt, Bolt, Mr. Big, Boom, Raptor, Amp, Fusion, Hi-Tiger, Eastroc Super Drink, Carabao,
Power Horse, XL, Crazy Tiger, Effect, Missile, Nocco, Adrenaline Rush, Real Gold, War Horse, BLU, and a host
of other international brands.
Our Reign Total Body Fuel® and Reign Inferno® Thermogenic Fuel high performance energy drinks
compete with VPX Bang, Adrenaline Shoc, C4, CELSIUS, NOCCO, Rockstar XDURANCE in the performance
energy category.
Our Java Monster® and Espresso Monster® product lines compete directly with Starbucks Frappuccino,
Starbucks Doubleshot, Starbucks Doubleshot Energy Plus Coffee, Starbucks Tripleshot and other Starbucks coffee
drinks, Costa Coffee, Rockstar Roasted, Dunkin Donuts, Gold Peak, Stok, High Brew, McCafé, hi*ball, Douwe
Egberts Coffee, Emmi CAFFÈ, Bang Keto Coffee, Nescafe, Black Rifle and International Delight.
Our Muscle Monster® product line competes directly with Muscle Milk, Core Power, Premier Protein,
Kellogg’s Special K Protein, Bolthouse Farms Protein, EAS AdvantEDGE, EAS Myoplex and Gatorade G Series
03 Recover.
Our Monster Hydro® Energy Water, Monster HydroSport Super Fuel® and Monster Hydro® Super Sport
product lines compete directly with Vitamin Water, Sparkling Ice, Bai, Propel, Vita Coco, Lucozade, Powerade,
Gatorade Bolt 24 and BODYARMOR.
Our True North® Pure Energy Seltzer product line competes directly with Celsius and Alani Nu.
Sales and Marketing
Our sales and marketing strategy for all our beverages is to focus our efforts on developing brand awareness
through image-enhancing programs and product sampling. We use our branded vehicles and other promotional
vehicles at events where we offer samples of our products to consumers. We utilize “push-pull” methods to enhance
shelf and display space exposure in sales outlets (including racks, coolers and barrel coolers), advertising, in-store
promotions and in-store placement of point-of-sale materials to encourage demand from consumers for our
products. We also support our brands with prize promotions, price promotions, competitions, endorsements from

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selected public and sports figures, sports personality endorsements, sampling and sponsorship of selected athletes,
teams, series, bands, esports, causes and events. In-store posters, outdoor posters, social media, concerts, print, radio
and television advertising (directly and through our sponsorships and endorsements) and coupons may also be used
to promote our brands.
We believe that one of the keys to success in the beverage industry is differentiation, making our brands
and products visually appealing and distinctive from other beverages on the shelves of retailers. We review our
products and packaging on an ongoing basis and, where practical, endeavor to make them different and unique. The
labels and graphics for many of our products are redesigned and refreshed from time to time to maximize their
visibility and identification, wherever they may be placed in stores, which we continue to reevaluate from time to
time.
Where appropriate, we partner with our bottlers/distributors and/or retailers to assist our marketing efforts.
We increased expenditures for our sales and marketing programs by approximately 21.0% in the twelvemonths ended December 31, 2021 compared to the twelve-months ended December 31, 2020. This increase was
primarily due to increased expenditures for sponsorship and endorsements as well as social and digital marketing.
During the comparative twelve-months ended December 31, 2020, we decreased expenditures for sponsorship and
endorsements and decreased expenditures for travel and entertainment, each largely as a consequence of the
COVID-19 pandemic. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic was less pronounced on our sales and marketing
programs in the twelve-months ended December 31, 2021. We increased expenditures for our sales and marketing
programs by approximately 9.2% in the twelve-months ended December 31, 2021 compared to the twelve-months
ended December 31, 2019 (pre COVID-19).
Customers
Our customers are primarily full service beverage bottlers/distributors, retail grocery, drug and specialty
chains, wholesalers, club stores, mass merchandisers, convenience chains, foodservice customers, value stores, ecommerce retailers and the military. Percentages of our gross billings to our various customer types for the years
ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 are reflected below. Such information includes sales made by us directly
to the customer types concerned, which include our full service beverage bottlers/distributors in the United States.
Such full service beverage bottlers/distributors in turn sell certain of our products to some of the same customer
types listed below. We limit our description of our customer types to include only our sales to our full service
bottlers/distributors without reference to such bottlers/distributors’ sales to their own customers.
2021 2020 2019

U.S. full service bottlers/distributors
International full service bottlers/distributors
Club stores and e-commerce retailers
Retail grocery, direct convenience, specialty chains and wholesalers
Direct value stores and other
51%
39%
8%
1%
1%
56%
34%
8%
1%
1%
58%
33%
7%
1%
1%

Our customers include Coca-Cola Canada Bottling Limited, Coca-Cola Consolidated, Inc., Coca-Cola
Bottling Company United, Inc., Reyes Coca-Cola Bottling, LLC, Great Lakes Coca-Cola Distribution, LLC, CocaCola Southwest Beverages LLC, The Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England, Inc., Swire Pacific
Holdings, Inc. (USA), Liberty Coca-Cola Beverages, LLC, Coca-Cola Europacific Partners (formerly Coca-Cola
European Partners and Coca-Cola Amatil), Coca-Cola Hellenic, Coca-Cola FEMSA, Swire Coca-Cola (China),
COFCO Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola Beverages Africa, Coca-Cola İçecek and certain other TCCC network bottlers,
Asahi Soft Drinks, Co., Ltd., Wal-Mart, Inc. (including Sam’s Club), Costco Wholesale Corporation and
Amazon.com, Inc. A decision by any large customer to decrease amounts purchased from us or to cease carrying
our products could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and consolidated results of operations.
Coca-Cola Consolidated, Inc. accounted for approximately 12%, 12% and 13% of our net sales for the years
ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

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Reyes Coca-Cola Bottling, LLC accounted for approximately 10%, 11% and 11% of our net sales for the
years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Coca-Cola Europacific Partners accounted for approximately 12%, 10% and 10% of our net sales for the
years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019.
Seasonality
Sales of ready-to-drink beverages are somewhat seasonal, with the second and third calendar quarters
accounting for the highest sales volumes. We believe that the volume of sales in the beverage industry is affected
by weather conditions. However, the energy drink category appears to be less seasonal than traditional beverages.
Quarterly fluctuations may also be affected by other factors including the introduction of new products, the opening
of new markets, particularly internationally, where temperature fluctuations may be more pronounced, the addition
of new bottlers and distributors, changes in the mix of the sales of our finished products and increased or decreased
advertising and promotional expenses.
Intellectual Property
We presently have more than 16,400 registered trademarks and pending applications in various countries
worldwide, and we apply for new trademarks on an ongoing basis. We regard our trademarks, service marks,
copyrights, domain names, trade dress and other intellectual property as very important to our business. We consider
Monster®, Monster Energy®, ®, Monster Energy Ultra®, Monster Dragon Tea®, Unleash the Beast!®, Mutant®,
Monster Rehab®, Java Monster®, Muscle Monster®, Punch Monster®, Juice Monster®, Hydro® (stylized),
Monster HydroSport Super Fuel®, Monster Super Fuel®, Espresso Monster®, Monster Energy® Nitro, Reign Total
Body Fuel®, Reign Inferno®, True North®, BU®, Nalu®, NOS®, Full Throttle®, Burn®, Mother®, Ultra
Energy®, Play® and Power Play® (stylized), Relentless®, Predator®, Fury®, Live+® and BPM® to be our core
trademarks. We also own the intellectual property of our most important flavors for certain of our Monster Energy®
Brand energy drinks in perpetuity.
We have registered Monster®, Monster Energy®, ®, Monster Energy Ultra®, Unleash the Beast!®,
Mutant®, Monster Rehab®, Java Monster®, Muscle Monster®, Punch Monster®, Juice Monster®, Hydro®
(stylized), Espresso Monster®, True North®, BU®, Nalu®, Burn®, Mother®, Play®, Power Play® (stylized),
Relentless®, Ultra Energy®, BPM®, Predator®, Fury®, Live+®, Reign®, Reign Total Body Fuel® and Reign
Inferno® outside of the United States in certain jurisdictions.
We protect our trademarks by applying for registrations and registering our trademarks with the United
States Patent and Trademark Office and with government agencies in other countries around the world, particularly
where our products are distributed and sold. We assert copyright ownership of the statements, graphics and content
appearing on the packaging of our products and in our marketing materials. We aggressively pursue individuals
and/or entities seeking to profit from the unauthorized use of our trademarks and copyrights, including, without
limitation, wholesalers, street vendors, retailers, online auction site sellers and website operators. In addition to
initiating civil actions against these individuals and entities, we work with law enforcement officials where
appropriate.
Depending upon the jurisdiction, trademarks are valid as long as they are in use and/or their registrations
are properly maintained and they have not been found to have become generic. Registrations of trademarks can
generally be renewed as long as the trademarks are in use.
We also enforce and protect our trademark rights against third parties infringing or disparaging our
trademarks by opposing registration of conflicting trademarks and initiating litigation as necessary.
Government Regulation
The production, distribution and sale in the United States of many of our products are subject to various
U.S. federal, state and local regulations, including but not limited to: the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act

18
(“FD&C Act”); the Occupational Safety and Health Act and various state laws and regulations governing workplace
health and safety; various environmental statutes; the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986
(“California Proposition 65”); various state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to the sale and distribution
of alcoholic beverages; data privacy and personal data protection laws and regulations, including the California
Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (as modified by the California Privacy Rights Act) and a number of other federal,
state and local statutes and regulations applicable to the production, transportation, sale, safety, advertising,
marketing, labeling and ingredients of such products. Outside the United States, the production, distribution and
sale of many of our products are also subject to numerous statutes and regulations.
We also may in the future be affected by other existing, proposed and potential future regulations or
regulatory actions, including those described below, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial
condition and results of operations. See “Part I, Item 1A – Risk Factors – Changes in government regulation, or
failure to comply with existing regulations, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of
operations” and “Significant changes to or failure to comply with various environmental laws may expose us to
liability and/or cause certain of our facilities to close, relocate or operate at reduced production levels, which could
adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations” below for additional information.
Furthermore, legislation may be introduced in the United States and other countries at the federal, state,
municipal and supranational level in respect of each of the subject areas discussed below. Public health officials
and health advocates are increasingly focused on the public health consequences associated with obesity, especially
as it affects children, and are seeking legislative change to reduce the consumption of sweetened beverages. There
also has been an increased focus on caffeine content in beverages and we are seeing some attention to other
ingredients in energy drinks.
Product Formulation, Labeling and Advertising. Globally, we are subject to a number of regulations
applicable to the formulation, labeling and advertising (including promotional campaigns) of our products. In
California, we are subject to California Proposition 65, a law which requires that a specified warning be provided
before exposing California consumers to any product that contains in excess of threshold amounts of a substance
listed by California as having been found to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity. California Proposition 65 does
not require a warning if the manufacturer of a product can demonstrate that the use of the product in question
exposes consumers to an average daily quantity of a listed substance that is below that threshold amount, which is
determined either by scientific criteria set forth in applicable regulations or via a “safe harbor” threshold that may
be established by the state, or the substance is naturally occurring, or is subject to another applicable exception. If
we are required to add warning labels to any of our products or place warnings in certain locations where our
products are sold, it will be difficult to predict whether, or to what extent, such a warning would have an adverse
impact on sales of our products in those locations or elsewhere.
In addition, in May 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”) revised regulations with
respect to serving size information and nutrition labeling on food and beverage products, including a new
requirement to disclose the amount of added sugars in such products. These changes went into effect on January 1,
2020. Further, in December 2018, the U.S. Department of Agriculture promulgated regulations requiring that, by
January 1, 2022, the labels of certain bioengineered foods include a disclosure that the food is bioengineered.
Additionally, these new regulations may impact, reduce and/or otherwise affect the purchase and consumption of
our products by consumers.
Other countries, such as Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, the member states of the
Gulf Cooperation Council, Mexico, and the People’s Republic of China, are also considering, or have enacted, new
labeling requirements, which may require us to amend our labels and warning statements. The United Kingdom
Government has also suggested that it may review food labeling laws following the United Kingdom’s departure
from the European Union (“Brexit”).
Age and Other Restrictions on Energy Drink Products. Proposals to limit or restrict the sale and/or
advertising of energy drinks to minors and/or persons below a specified age, and/or restrict the venues in which

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energy drinks can be sold, and/or to restrict the use of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly
food stamps) to purchase energy drinks have been raised and/or enacted in certain U.S. states, counties,
municipalities and/or in certain foreign countries. For example, in the United States, bills seeking to impose an age
restriction on the sale of energy drinks have been introduced in the Connecticut, Massachusetts, and South Carolina
legislatures. Outside of the United States, for example, Latvia, Lithuania and Turkey prohibit the sale of energy
drinks to persons under the age of 18; Canada prohibits the promotion of energy drinks to children 12 years and
under; Latvia and Scotland prohibit the sale of energy drinks in educational establishments; and Turkey prohibits
the sale or advertising of energy drinks in “collective consumption areas,” such as sports complexes, schools or
hospitals. In Mexico, the States of Tabasco and Oaxaca prohibit the sale of energy drinks to minors and the
consumption in schools; Colima prohibits the sale of energy drinks in private and public schools. Other Latin
American countries such as Chile, Colombia and Brazil have been considering age and other sales restrictions on
energy drinks, as are other countries such as the United Kingdom, Spain, Romania and Bulgaria.
Excise Taxes on Energy Drinks. Legislation that would impose an excise tax on sweetened beverages has
been proposed in the U.S. Congress, in some state legislatures and by some local governments, with excise taxes
generally ranging between $0.01 and $0.02 per ounce of sweetened beverage. Berkeley, California became the first
jurisdiction to pass such a measure, and a general tax of $0.01 per ounce on certain sweetened drinks, including
energy drinks, became effective on January 1, 2015. Other U.S. jurisdictions (including Albany, Oakland and San
Francisco, California; Boulder, Colorado; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Seattle, Washington) have passed similar
measures, some of which have been challenged in litigation. The imposition of such taxes on our products would
increase the cost of certain of our products or, to the extent levied directly on consumers, make certain of our
products less affordable. Excise taxes on sweetened beverages already are in effect in certain foreign countries
where we do business, such as France, the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa and Mexico. Poland recently
established a tax on drinks with added sugars, specifically targeting beverages containing caffeine and taurine. Other
countries, including the Dominican Republic, are considering similar measures. In addition, legislation has been
proposed in certain jurisdictions that would specifically impose excise taxes on energy drinks. For example, Kuwait
is considering a proposal that would impose an excise tax on energy drinks. Such targeted legislation has been
passed in other countries. For instance, on January 1, 2020, a reform to a Mexican excise tax went into effect that
expanded the definition of an “energy drink” subject to this tax to include products with any amount of caffeine
(the prior version of the tax required a threshold of 20 milligrams of caffeine per 100 millimeters for the tax to be
applicable) and “taurine or glucuronolactone or thiamine and/or any other substance that produces similar
stimulating effects.” Hungary has instituted an excise tax to which our products are subject. Bahrain, Saudi Arabia
and the United Arab Emirates began applying a selective tax of 100% on energy drinks in 2017, Qatar and Oman
began applying the tax in 2019, and there are indications that a similar measure may be enacted in Kuwait.
Limits on Caffeine Content. Legislation has been proposed to limit the amount of caffeine that may be
contained in beverages, including energy drinks. Some jurisdictions where we do business have prescribed limited
caffeine content for beverages. For example, in Canada, the maximum amount of caffeine cannot exceed 180 mg
per single-serving container or per serving (500 ml) in the case of a multi-serving container. We adjusted the
caffeine levels in certain of our Monster Energy® products that are sold in Canada to address these regulations,
although the majority of our products were unaffected. In Europe, examples of caffeine restrictions include the
Netherlands where there is a limit of 35mg/100ml, and Norway introduced, as of January 1, 2020 (subject to
transition periods), a limit of 32mg/100ml. Caffeine limit restrictions or restrictions on combining caffeine with
other ingredients or in particular product sectors (such as performance beverages/sport drinks) have also been
implemented or proposed in other jurisdictions, including Turkey, India, Pakistan’s Punjab region, Egypt, Spain
and the member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council. Such restrictions could require reformulations of certain of
our products. However, we may not be able to satisfactorily reformulate our products in all jurisdictions that adopt
similar legislation.
Limitations on Container Size. We package our products in a variety of different package types and sizes
including, for certain of our Monster Energy® brand energy drinks, aluminum cans larger than 16 fluid ounces.
Certain jurisdictions, such as Colombia, Costa Rica, Egypt, the Dominican Republic, and Spain, are considering

20
container size limitations on energy drinks and other beverages which may require us to change the size of our
products sold in these countries. Other countries, like England, have considered and rejected proposed can size
limitations although it is open to such markets to revisit these and other similar proposals.
Compliance with Environmental Laws
Our facilities and those of our co-packers in the United States are subject to federal, state and local
environmental laws and regulations, including those relating to air emissions, the use of water resources and
recycling. Our operations in other countries are subject to similar federal, state, local and supranational laws and
regulations that may be applicable in such countries. Changes in environmental compliance mandates, and any
expenditures necessary to comply with such requirements, could adversely affect our financial performance and
future growth. Compliance with these provisions has not had, nor do we expect such compliance to have, any
material adverse effect upon our capital expenditures, net income or competitive position.
Container Deposits. Various municipalities, states and foreign countries require that a deposit be charged
for certain non-refillable beverage containers. The precise requirements imposed by these measures vary by
jurisdiction. Other deposit, recycling or product stewardship proposals have been, and may in the future be,
introduced in certain U.S. states, counties, municipalities and in certain foreign countries.
In California, we are required to collect redemption values from our customers and to remit such redemption
values to the State of California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery based upon the number of cans
and bottles of certain carbonated and non-carbonated products sold. In certain other states and countries where our
products are sold, we are also required to collect deposits from our customers and to remit such deposits to the
respective jurisdictions based upon the number of cans and bottles of certain carbonated and non-carbonated
products sold in such states.
Human Capital Resources
As of December 31, 2021, we have employees in 69 countries, with a total of 4,092 employees working
worldwide. This employee population includes 2,714 employees in North America, 292 employees in Latin
America, 254 employees in Asia Pacific and 832 employees in Europe, Mideast and Africa (“EMEA”). Most of our
employees are full-time (3,458 employees) and the remaining 634 employees hold part-time positions. Of our 4,092
employees, we employ 1,256 in corporate and operational capacities (including administration, human resources,
legal, information technology, operations, facilities, warehouse, product development, regulatory and accounting)
and 2,836 persons in sales and marketing capacities.
As of December 31, 2021, approximately 48% of our U.S. employees are from one or more
underrepresented groups, including, but not limited to, Black, Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American and
other Indigenous tribes and approximately 39% of our U.S. employees are female.
In 2020, we established our Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Leadership Advisory Group, comprised
of leaders from across the Company, designed to provide insight on our diversity and inclusion efforts and to assist
in the integration of the EDI program with our overall strategy and business objectives. We provide training for our
employees covering harassment, discrimination and unconscious bias.
We support our employees through a variety of training and development programs. We have a mid-level
manager development program, in which participants learn leadership skills, network with peers and senior
executives, and tackle critical initiatives. We also have a leadership development platform in partnership with a
third party, for senior leaders to receive university grade certificates in business strategy and innovation and
complete Food and Beverage Executive courses as well as an electronic learning platform that focuses on business
acumen, professional development and technical capabilities.

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We provide compensation packages designed to attract and retain talent while maintaining alignment with
market compensation surveys. We have multiple short-term incentive programs focused on incentivizing and
retaining talent throughout the organization and provide long-term incentive programs to employees through equity
and/or performance cash awards. We currently cover the cost of insurance premiums including medical, dental,
vision, life, accidental death and dismemberment, short and long term disability, and an Employee Assistance
Program (EAP) covering full-time employees and share in the cost of insurance premiums covering eligible
dependents including medical, dental and vision coverage. We also offer several voluntary benefits to full-time
employees, including supplemental life insurance, whole life insurance, accident insurance, critical illness
insurance, flexible spending accounts, travel insurance, pre-paid legal, healthy rewards programs, identity theft
assistance, and retirement savings account(s).
COVID-19 Employee Health Measures and Support. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have
implemented measures to ensure the health, safety, and well-being of our employees and have adapted such
measures based on our close monitoring of the rapidly evolving situation. We have implemented work-from-home
policies for employees who are able to work remotely. Where possible, we provide employees with equipment to
facilitate home-based work. For those employees unable to work remotely, we implemented safety precautions,
such as on-site COVID-19 testing, which were developed and adopted in line with guidance from public health
authorities and professional consultants. We have also provided our employees with the following: year-end
bonuses for essential, hourly employees; increased employee communications, including on topics such as mental
health and family welfare; weekly and bi-weekly communication from executive leadership; wellness hotlines and
enhanced employee assistance programs; employee surveys to evaluate employee morale; and resilience training
programs to provide employees with the tools and resources to be resilient in the current climate, to stay healthy,
and to engage in self-care.
Available Information
As a public company, we are required to file our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form
10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, proxy statements on Schedule 14A and other information (including any
amendments) with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). You can find the Company’s SEC filings
at the SEC’s website, which contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding
issuers that file electronically with the SEC, at http://www.sec.gov.
Our Internet address is www.monsterbevcorp.com. Information contained on our website is not part of or
incorporated into this filing or any of our other filings with the SEC. Our SEC filings (including any amendments)
will be made available free of charge at www.monsterbevcorp.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after we
electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. In addition, you may request a copy of these filings
(excluding exhibits) at no cost by writing to, or telephoning us, at the following address or telephone number:
Monster Beverage Corporation
1 Monster Way
Corona, CA 92879
(951) 739-6200
(800) 426-7367
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
In addition to the other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including Management’s
Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the consolidated financial statements
and related notes, you should carefully consider the following risks. If any of the following risks actually occur or
continue to occur, our business, reputation, financial condition and/or operating results could be materially
adversely affected. The risk factors summarized below are not the only risks we face. Additional risks and
uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial may also materially adversely
affect our business, reputation, financial condition and/or operating results.

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Risk Factors Summary
The following is a summary of the principal risks that could materially adversely affect our business,
reputation, financial condition and/or operating results. You should read this summary together with the more
detailed description of each risk contained below.
Operational and Industry Risks
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted and we expect will continue to impact our business and operations.
The Company and TCCC have extensive commercial arrangements and, as a result, the Company’s future
performance is substantially dependent on the success of its relationship with TCCC.
Provisions in our organizational documents and control by insiders or TCCC may prevent changes in
control even if such changes would be beneficial to other stockholders.
We rely on bottlers and other contract packers to manufacture our products. If we are unable to maintain
good relationships with our bottlers and contract packers and/or their ability to manufacture our products
becomes constrained or unavailable to us, our business could suffer.
We rely on bottlers and distributors to distribute our products. If we are unable to maintain good
relationships with our existing bottlers and distributors and/or secure such bottlers and distributors, our
business could suffer.
We derive virtually all of our revenues from energy drinks, and competitive pressure in the energy drink
category could adversely affect our business and operating results.
Criticism of our energy drink products and/or criticism or a negative perception of energy drinks generally,
could adversely affect us.
Increased competition in the beverage industry and changing retail landscape could hurt our business.
Our inability to implement our growth strategy, including expanding our business in existing and new
sectors, such as the alcohol beverage sector, or successfully integrate acquired businesses or assets could
adversely affect our business and financial results.
Changes in consumer product and shopping preferences may reduce demand for our products.
Our continued expansion outside of the United States exposes us to uncertain conditions and other risks in
international markets.
If we are not able to pass on increases in the costs of raw materials, including aluminum cans and/or
ingredients and/or fuel and/or costs of co-packing, such inability could harm our business and result in a
higher cost base. Shortages of raw materials including aluminum cans and/or ingredients and/or fuel and/or
costs of co-packing could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
Our failure to accurately estimate demand for our products or maintain sufficient inventory levels could
adversely affect our business and financial results.
The costs of packaging supplies, ocean and domestic freight, and inflation generally may adversely affect
our results of operations.
Global or regional catastrophic events could impact our operations and affect our ability to grow our
business.
Climate change and natural disasters may negatively affect our business.
If we are not able to retain the services of our workforce, there may be an adverse effect on our operations
and/or our operating performance until we find suitable replacements.
Negative publicity (whether or not warranted) could damage our brand image and corporate reputation, and
may cause our business to suffer.
Government Regulation and Litigation Risks
Changes in government regulation, or failure to comply with existing regulations, could adversely affect
our business, financial condition and results of operations.

23
Significant changes to or failure to comply with various environmental laws may expose us to liability
and/or cause certain of our facilities to close, relocate or operate at reduced production levels, which could
adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We cannot predict the effect of possible inquiries from and/or actions by attorneys general, other
government agencies and/or quasi-government agencies into the production, advertising, marketing,
promotion, labeling, ingredients, usage and/or sale of our energy drink products.
Litigation regarding our products, and related unfavorable media attention, could expose us to significant
liabilities and reduce demand for our products, thus negatively affecting our financial results.
If we encounter material product recalls, our business may suffer material losses and such recalls could
damage our brand image and corporate reputation, also resulting in material losses.
Intellectual Property, Information Technology and Data Privacy Risks
Our intellectual property rights are critical to our success, and the loss of such rights could materially
adversely affect our business.
We must continually maintain, monitor, protect and/or upgrade our information technology systems,
including protecting us from internal and external cybersecurity threats.
If we fail to comply with data privacy and personal data protection laws, we could be subject to adverse
publicity, government enforcement actions and/or private litigation, which may negatively impact our
business and operating results.
Financial Risks
Fluctuations in our effective tax rate could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
We may be required in the future to record a significant charge to earnings if our goodwill or intangible
assets become impaired.
Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates may adversely affect our operating results.
Potential changes in accounting standards or practices and/or taxation may adversely affect our financial
results.
If we fail to maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial
reporting on a consolidated basis, our stock price and investor confidence in the Company could be
materially and adversely affected.
Uncertainty in the financial markets and other adverse changes in general economic or political conditions
in any of the major countries in which we do business could adversely affect our industry, business and
results of operations.
Default by or failure of one or more of our counterparty financial institutions could cause us to incur
significant losses.
Volatility of stock price may restrict sale opportunities.
Our investments are subject to risks which may cause losses and affect the liquidity of these investments.
Operational and Industry Risks
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted and we expect will continue to impact our business and operations.
The current COVID-19 pandemic has presented and continues to present a substantial public health and
economic challenge around the world and is affecting our employees, communities and business operations, as well
as the global economy and financial markets. The human and economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic

24
as well as the measures taken or that may be taken in the future by governments, businesses (including the Company
and our suppliers, bottlers/distributors, co-packers and other service providers) and the public at large to limit the
COVID-19 pandemic, have and will directly and indirectly impact our business and results of operations, including,
without limitation, the following:
The COVID-19 pandemic has directly and indirectly impacted our business. The duration and
severity of this impact will depend on future developments that are highly uncertain and cannot be
accurately predicted, including new information regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the
emergence of new variants, the action taken to limit its spread and the economic impact on local,
regional, national and international markets. As countries continue to combat the COVID-19
pandemic, and as governments and/or local authorities impose regulations regarding COVID-19
testing, vaccine mandates and related workplace restrictions, there remains a risk that the COVID-
19 pandemic may impact our business and supply chain, including our ability to recruit and/or
retain our employees as well as impact our co-packers, bottlers/distributors and/or suppliers.
Deteriorating economic conditions and continued financial uncertainties in many of our major
markets due to the COVID-19 pandemic, such as inflation, increased and prolonged
unemployment, decreases in per capita income and the level of disposable income, declines in
consumer confidence, or economic slowdowns or recessions, could affect consumer purchasing
power and consumers’ ability to purchase our products, thereby reducing demand for our products.
In addition, public concern among consumers regarding the risk of contracting COVID-19 may
also reduce demand for our products.
The closures of, and continued restrictions on, on-premise retailers and other establishments that
sell our products as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic have adversely impacted and may continue
to adversely impact our sales and results of operations.
Our product sampling programs, which are part of our strategy to develop brand awareness, have
been, and will continue to be, disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. If we are unable to
successfully adapt to the changing landscape of advertising, marketing, promotional, sponsorship
and endorsement opportunities created by the COVID-19 pandemic, our sales, market share,
volume growth and overall financial results could be negatively affected.
Our innovation activities, including our ability to introduce new products in certain markets, have
been delayed and/or adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. If such innovation activities
are disrupted and we continue to delay the launch of new products and/or we are unable to secure
sufficient distribution levels for such new products, our business and results of operations could be
adversely affected.
Some of our suppliers, bottlers/distributors and co-packers have experienced, and likely will
continue to experience, plant closures, production slowdowns and disruptions in operations as a
result of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. This could result in material disruptions to our
operations.
We have experienced and may continue to experience delays in receiving certain raw materials as
a result of shipping delays due to, among other things, additional safety requirements imposed by
port authorities, closures of, or congestion at ports, reduced availability of commercial
transportation, freight inefficiencies, shortages of shipping containers, border restrictions and
capacity constraints.
Due to increased demand in at home beverage consumption, aluminum cans remain in tight supply,
which could adversely impact or limit our sales and/or results of operations. We may also need to
commit to minimum purchase volumes in order to secure sufficient quantities of certain raw

25
materials including aluminum cans, as well as minimum co-packing volumes, which may lead to
claims, costs, or losses if we over-estimate future demand for our products and do not use such
volumes in full.
We rely on relationships with third parties for cloud data storage and other information technology
services for certain functions or for services in support of our operations. These third parties are
subject to risks and uncertainties related to the COVID-19 pandemic, which may interfere with
their ability to fulfill their respective commitments and responsibilities to us in a timely manner
and in accordance with the agreed-upon terms.
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, including related governmental measures, restrictions,
directives and guidance, most of our office-based employees continue to work remotely. We may
experience reductions in productivity and disruptions to our business routines while our remote
work policy remains in place. If our employees working remotely do not maintain appropriate
measures to mitigate potential risks to our technology and operations from information technologyrelated disruptions, we may face cybersecurity threats. Employees of our third-party service
providers who are working remotely, with whom we may share data, are subject to similar
cybersecurity risks.
Governmental authorities at the U.S. federal, state and/or municipal level and in certain foreign
jurisdictions may increase or impose new income taxes, indirect taxes or other taxes or revise
interpretations of existing tax rules and regulations as a means of financing the costs of stimulus or
may take other measures to protect populations and economies from the impact of the COVID-19
pandemic. Increases in direct and indirect tax rates could affect our net income, and increases in
consumer taxes could affect our products’ affordability and reduce our sales.
We may be required to record significant impairment charges with respect to goodwill or intangible
assets, whose fair values may be negatively affected by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
The continued financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic may cause one or more of the financial
institutions we do business with to fail or default in their obligations to us or to become insolvent
or file for bankruptcy, which could cause us to incur significant losses and negatively impact our
results of operations and financial condition.
Actions we have taken or may take, or decisions we have made or may make, as a consequence of
the COVID-19 pandemic may result in negative publicity and the Company becoming a party to
litigation claims and/or legal proceedings, which could consume significant financial and
managerial resources, result in decreased demand for our products and injury to our reputation.
The resumption of normal business operations after the disruptions caused by the COVID-19
pandemic may be delayed or constrained by the COVID-19 pandemic’s lingering effects on our
suppliers, bottlers/distributors, co-packers, contractors, business partners and/or other service
providers.
Any of the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, including those described above, alone or in
combination with others, may have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation, operating results and/or
financial condition. Any of these negative impacts, alone or in combination with others, could exacerbate many of
the risk factors discussed herein, any of which could materially affect our business, reputation, operating results
and/or financial condition.
The Company and TCCC have extensive commercial arrangements and, as a result, the Company’s future
performance is substantially dependent on the success of its relationship with TCCC.

26
We have transitioned all third parties’ rights to distribute the Company’s products in the U.S. to members
of TCCC’s distribution network, which largely consists of independent bottlers/distributors. In addition, except for
a handful of countries, TCCC is our preferred distribution partner globally, with members of TCCC’s network
distributing our products internationally, including in Africa, Asia, Canada, Central and South America, Europe,
Mexico and the Middle East. As we progress our international expansion, we expect TCCC’s distribution network
to continue as our preferred distribution partner globally. As a result, we have reduced our distributor diversification
and are now dependent on TCCC’s domestic and international distribution platforms.
TCCC has a substantial equity investment in the Company. The Company, TCCC and certain affiliates are
parties to various agreements in which TCCC and certain affiliates have agreed, subject to certain exceptions, not
to compete in the energy drink category in certain territories prior to the termination of the applicable distribution
coordination agreement with TCCC. The Company’s distribution agreements with TCCC distributors also provide,
subject to certain exceptions, that the applicable distributor will not distribute competitive energy drink products.
While we believe that these agreements incentivize TCCC to take steps to ensure that our products receive
the appropriate attention in the TCCC distribution system, disagreements as to the interpretation of the provisions
in such agreements have arisen and may arise in the future. In addition, TCCC does not control all members of its
distribution system, many of which are independent companies that make their own business decisions that may
not always align with TCCC’s interests.
Provisions in our organizational documents and control by insiders or TCCC may prevent changes in control even
if such changes would be beneficial to other stockholders.
Our organizational documents may limit changes in control. Furthermore, as of February 16, 2022, Mr.
Sacks and Mr. Schlosberg together may be deemed to beneficially own and/or exercise voting control over
approximately 10% of our outstanding common stock. As of February 16, 2022, TCCC owned approximately 19%
of our common stock. TCCC has also nominated one director to the Company’s board of directors. Consequently,
Mr. Sacks, Mr. Schlosberg and TCCC could exercise significant control over matters submitted to a vote of our
stockholders, including electing directors, amending organizational documents and disapproving extraordinary
transactions such as a takeover attempt, even though such actions may be favorable to the other common
stockholders.
In particular, TCCC’s ownership could have an effect on the Company’s ability to engage in a change in
control transaction. TCCC is obligated for a period of time to vote all of its common shares of the Company in
excess of 20% of the outstanding common shares in the same proportion as all common shares not owned by TCCC
with respect to a proposal for a change of control. However, if TCCC were to oppose such a change-in-control
transaction, a bidder would be required to secure the support of holders of 62.5% of the Company’s common shares
not owned by TCCC (assuming that TCCC increased its ownership to 20% of the Company’s common shares) to
achieve a vote of a majority of the Company’s outstanding shares for a change-in-control transaction. In addition,
TCCC would have a bidding advantage if the Company’s board of directors were to seek to sell the Company in
the future because TCCC would not need to pay a control premium on the shares it owns at such time. TCCC and
the Company would also be permitted to terminate TCCC’s distribution coordination agreements with the Company
after a change in control of the Company. In such event, TCCC would receive a termination fee if TCCC terminated
the distribution coordination agreements following a change in control of the Company involving certain TCCC
competitors, or if the Company terminated following a change in control of the Company involving any third-party.
The interests of TCCC may be different from or conflict with the interests of the Company’s other
stockholders and, as a result, TCCC’s influence may result in the delay or prevention of potential actions or
transactions. Moreover, TCCC’s ownership of a significant amount of the Company’s outstanding common shares
could result in downward pressure on the trading price of the Company’s common shares if TCCC were to sell a
large portion of its shares or as a result of the perception that such a sale might occur.

27
We rely on bottlers and other contract packers to manufacture our products. If we are unable to maintain good
relationships with our bottlers and contract packers and/or their ability to manufacture our products becomes
constrained or unavailable to us, our business could suffer.
Our acquisition of AFF in 2016 brought our primary flavor supplier in-house for the majority of our Monster
Energy® brand energy drinks. However, we also procure flavors from other independent flavor suppliers. We do
not operate our own manufacturing facilities for finished goods, but instead outsource manufacturing of our finished
goods to bottlers and other contract packers. As a result, in the event of a disruption and/or delay, and/or demand
exceeding forecasted demand, we may be unable to procure alternative packing facilities at commercially
reasonable rates and/or within a reasonably short time period. In addition, there are limited alternative packing
facilities in our domestic and international markets with adequate capacity and/or suitable equipment for many of
our products. For example, in 2021, sales of many of our product lines were adversely impacted by production
capacity constraints as a result of above forecast demand. A lengthy disruption or delay in the production of any of
our products could significantly adversely affect our revenues from such products, because alternative co-packing
facilities in the United States and abroad with adequate long-term capacity may not be available for such products
either at commercially reasonable rates and/or costs and/or within a reasonably short time period, if at all. In
addition, recently there has been a consolidation of co-packers. If we are unable to maintain good relationships with
our largest co-packers, or if our costs of co-packing increase, our business, financial condition and results of
operations could be adversely affected.
We rely on bottlers and distributors to distribute our products. If we are unable to maintain good relationships with
our existing bottlers and distributors and/or secure such bottlers and distributors, our business could suffer.
Many of our bottlers/distributors are affiliated with and manufacture and/or distribute other carbonated,
non-carbonated and other beverage products. In many cases, such products compete directly with our products.
Unilateral decisions by bottlers/distributors, buying groups, convenience chains, grocery chains, mass
merchandisers, specialty chain stores, club stores, e-commerce retailers, e-commerce websites and other customers
to discontinue carrying all or any of our products that they are carrying at any time, restrict the range of our products
they carry, impose restrictions or limitations on the sale of our products and/or devote less resources to the sale of
our products could cause our business to suffer. In addition, possible trading disputes between our
bottler/distributors and their customers or buying groups may result in the delisting of certain of the Company’s
products, temporarily or otherwise. Bottler/distributor consolidation may also have an impact on our business.
The TCCC North American Bottlers, Coca-Cola Europacific Partners, Coca-Cola Hellenic, Coca-Cola
FEMSA, Coca-Cola Amatil, Swire Coca-Cola (China), COFCO Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola Beverages Africa and CocaCola İçecek are our primary domestic and international distributors of our products. As a result, if we are unable to
maintain good relationships with these bottlers/distributors, or they do not effectively focus on marketing,
promoting, selling and distributing our products, sales of our products could be adversely affected.
A decision by our primary domestic and international bottlers/distributors or any other large customer to
decrease the amount purchased from us or to cease carrying our products could have a material adverse effect on
our financial condition and consolidated results of operations.
The marketing efforts of our bottlers/distributors are important for our success. If our brands prove to be
less attractive to our existing bottlers and distributors, if we fail to attract additional bottlers and distributors, and/or
our bottlers/distributors do not market, promote and distribute our products effectively, our business, financial
condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.
Disruption in distribution channels and/or a decline in sales due to the termination and/or insolvency of
existing or new bottlers/distributors may adversely affect our business and operating results.
We derive virtually all of our revenues from energy drinks, and competitive pressure in the energy drink category
could adversely affect our business and operating results.

28
Our focus is in the energy drink category, and our business is vulnerable to adverse changes impacting the
energy drink category and business, which could adversely impact our business and the trading price of our common
stock.
Virtually all of our sales are derived from our energy drinks, including our Monster Energy® brand energy
drinks, our Reign Total Body Fuel® energy drinks and our Strategic Brands energy drinks (including our affordable
brand energy drinks, principally Predator®). Any decrease in the sales of our Monster Energy® brand and other
energy drinks could significantly adversely affect our future revenues and net income. Historically, we have
experienced substantial competition from new entrants in the energy drink category as well as from the energy shot
category. For a discussion of such competition, see “Part I, Item 1 – Business – Competition.”
The increasing number of competitive products and limited amount of shelf space in retail stores, including
in beverage coolers, may adversely impact our ability to gain or maintain our share of sales in the marketplace. In
addition, certain actions of our competitors, including unsubstantiated and/or misleading claims, false advertising
claims and tortious interference in our business, as well as competitors selling misbranded products, could impact
our sales. Competitive pressures in the energy drink category could impact our revenues, cause price erosion and/or
lower market share, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
Criticism of our energy drink products and/or criticism or a negative perception of energy drinks generally could
adversely affect us.
An unfavorable report on the health effects of caffeine, other ingredients in energy drinks or energy drinks
generally, or criticism or negative publicity regarding the caffeine content and/or any other ingredients in our
products or energy drinks generally, including product safety concerns, could have an adverse effect on our
business, financial condition and results of operations. Articles critical of the caffeine content and/or other
ingredients in energy drinks and/or articles indicating certain health risks of energy drinks have been published in
recent years. We believe the overall growth of the energy drink market in the U.S. may have been negatively
impacted by the ongoing negative publicity and comments that continue to appear in the media questioning the
safety of energy drinks, and suggesting limitations on their ingredients (including caffeine), and/or the levels
thereof, and/or imposing minimum age restrictions for consumers. In early 2018, certain retailers in the United
Kingdom announced the introduction of voluntary retailer measures to prevent the sale of energy drinks to
individuals under the age of 16. If reports, studies or articles critical of caffeine and/or energy drinks continue to be
published or are published in the future, or additional voluntary measures are taken, they could adversely affect the
demand for our products. If we are unable to satisfy all criteria set forth in any model energy drink guidelines,
including, without limitation, those adopted by the American Beverage Association, of which we are a member,
and/or any international beverage associations, it could negatively affect our overall reputation, which in turn could
have a negative impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Increased competition in the beverage industry and changing retail landscape could hurt our business.
The beverage industry is highly competitive. The principal areas of competition are pricing, packaging,
development of new products, flavors, product positioning as well as promotion and marketing strategies. Our
products compete with a wide range of drinks produced by a relatively large number of manufacturers, some of
which have substantially greater financial, marketing and distribution resources than we do.
Important factors affecting our ability to compete successfully include the efficacy, taste and flavor of our
products, trade and consumer promotions, rapid and effective development of new and unique cutting edge
products, attractive and different packaging, branded product advertising and pricing. The success of our sports
marketing, social media and other general marketing endeavors may impact our business, financial condition and
results of operation. Our products compete with all liquid refreshments and in some cases with products of much
larger competitors, including the products of numerous nationally and internationally known producers such as
TCCC, PepsiCo, Red Bull GmbH and KDP. We also compete with companies that are smaller or primarily national
or local in operations. Our products also compete with private-label brands such as those carried by grocery store
chains, convenience store chains and club stores.

29
The rapid growth in sales through e-commerce retailers, e-commerce websites, mobile commerce
applications and subscription services, and closures of physical retail operations, particularly during, and potentially
following, the COVID-19 pandemic, may result in a shift away from physical retail operations to digital channels
and a reduction in impulse purchases. As we build our e-commerce capabilities, we may not be able to develop and
maintain successful relationships with existing and new e-commerce retailers without experiencing a deterioration
of our relationships with key customers operating physical retail channels. If we are unable to profitably expand
our own e-commerce capabilities and/or if e-commerce retailers take significant market share away from traditional
retailers our business may be adversely affected. Further, the ability of consumers to compare prices on a real-time
basis using digital technology puts additional pressure on us to maintain competitive prices. Sales in gas chains may
also be affected by increased gasoline prices, improvements in fuel efficiency and increased consumer preferences
for electric or alternative fuel-powered vehicles, which may result in fewer trips by consumers to gas stations and
a corresponding reduction in purchases by consumers in convenience gas retailers. If we are unable to successfully
adapt to the rapidly changing retail landscape, our share of sales, volume growth and overall financial results could
be negatively affected.
Due to competition in the beverage industry, there can be no assurance that we will not encounter difficulties
in maintaining our current revenues, market share or position in the beverage industry. If our revenues decline, our
business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.
Our inability to implement our growth strategy, including expanding our business in existing and new sectors, such
as the alcohol beverage sector, or successfully integrate acquired businesses or assets could adversely affect our
business and financial results.
Our ability to compete in the highly competitive beverage industry and to achieve our business growth
objectives depends, in part, on our ability to develop new flavors, products and packaging. The success of our
innovation, in turn, depends on our ability to identify consumer trends and cater to consumer preferences. If we are
not successful in our innovation activities, our business, financial condition and results of operation could be
adversely affected.
On February 17, 2022, we acquired CANarchy, a craft beer and hard seltzer company and may continue to
make acquisitions that expand our business into new sectors in the beverage industry. Risks associated with entering
into a new sector include: (1) having no or limited experience in such sector; (2) increased exposure to certain
governmental regulations and compliance requirements; (3) difficulties developing, manufacturing, and marketing
the products of newly acquired companies in a way that enhances the performance of our combined businesses and
product lines; and (4) our lesser familiarity with consumer preferences in the new sector. Entry into new sectors of
the beverage industry will bring us into competition with new competitors with a larger, more established market
presence. We cannot ensure that our entry into the alcohol beverage sector or any other new beverage sectors will
be profitable and future profitability may be delayed or otherwise materially adversely affected.
Overall, the effectiveness of these acquisitions can be less predictable than developing new lines of energy
drinks and might not provide the anticipated benefits or desired rates of return. Integrating the operations of acquired
businesses could be a difficult, costly and time-consuming process that involves a number of risks including, but
not limited to, the integration of company cultures and management teams, retaining key employees and customers,
increased exposure to certain governmental regulations and compliance requirements, increased costs, and use of
resources. Even if we successfully integrate acquired businesses, it is possible that we will not realize the expected
benefits from any completed acquisition over the timeframe we expect, or at all, or that our existing operations will
be adversely affected as a result of acquisitions. The costs of achieving these benefits could also be higher than we
expected. Therefore, the acquisition and integration of acquired businesses may not contribute to our earnings as
expected, we may not achieve profit margin targets when expected, or at all, and we may not achieve the other
anticipated strategic financial benefits of such transactions.
Changes in consumer product and shopping preferences may reduce demand for our products.
The beverage industry is subject to changing consumer preferences and shifts in consumer preferences may
adversely affect us. There is increasing awareness of and concern for health, wellness and nutrition considerations,

30
including concerns regarding caloric intake associated with sugar-sweetened beverages and the perceived
undesirability of artificial ingredients. Some consumer advocacy groups and others have expressed concerns
regarding certain ingredients in diet sodas, which are contained in certain of our energy drinks. There are also
changes in demand for different packages, sizes and configurations. This may reduce demand for our beverages,
which could reduce our revenues and adversely affect our results of operations.
Consumers are seeking greater variety in their beverages. Our future success will depend, in part, upon our
continued ability to develop and introduce different and innovative beverages that appeal to consumers. In order to
retain and expand our market share, we must continue to develop and introduce different and innovative beverages
and be competitive in the areas of efficacy, taste, quality and price, although there can be no assurance of our ability
to do so. There is no assurance that consumers will continue to purchase our products in the future. Product
lifecycles for some beverage brands, products and/or packages may be limited to a few years before consumers’
preferences change. The beverages we currently market are in varying stages of their product lifecycles, and there
can be no assurance that such beverages will become or remain profitable for us. We may be unable to achieve
volume growth through product and packaging initiatives. We may also be unable to penetrate new markets.
Additionally, as shopping patterns are being affected by the digital evolution, with customers embracing shopping
by way of mobile device applications, e-commerce retailers and e-commerce websites or platforms, we may be
unable to address or anticipate changes in consumer shopping preferences or engage with our customers on their
preferred platforms. If our revenues decline, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be
adversely affected.
Our continued expansion outside of the United States exposes us to uncertain conditions and other risks in
international markets.
We have continued expanding our operations internationally into a variety of new markets. Our net sales to
customers outside of the United States were approximately 37%, 33% and 32% of consolidated net sales for the
years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively. As our growth strategy includes further expanding
our international business, if we are unable to continue to expand distribution of our products outside the United
States, our growth rate could be adversely affected. In many international markets, we have limited operating
experience and in some international markets we have no operating experience. It is costly to establish, develop and
maintain international operations and develop and promote our brands in international markets. Our percentage
gross profit margins in many international markets are expected to be less than the comparable percentage gross
profit margins obtained in the United States. We face and will continue to face substantial risks associated with
having foreign operations, including: economic and/or political instability in our international markets; fluctuations
in foreign currency exchange rates; restrictions on or costs relating to the repatriation of foreign profits to the United
States, including possible taxes and/or withholding obligations on any repatriations; and tariffs and/or trade
restrictions. These risks could have a significant impact on our ability to sell our products on a competitive basis in
international markets and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of
operations. Also, our operations outside of the United States are subject to risks relating to appropriate compliance
with legal and regulatory requirements in local jurisdictions, potential difficulties in staffing and managing local
operations, higher product damages, particularly when products are shipped long distances, potentially higher
incidence of fraud and/or corruption, credit risk of local customers and distributors and potentially adverse tax
consequences.
If we are not able to pass on increases in the costs of raw materials, including aluminum cans and/or ingredients
and/or fuel and/or costs of co-packing, such inability could harm our business and result in a higher cost base.
Shortages of raw materials including aluminum cans and/or ingredients and/or fuel and/or costs of co-packing
could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
The principal raw materials used by us are aluminum cans, sleek aluminum cans, aluminum cap cans,
aluminum cans with re-sealable ends, PET plastic bottles, caps, flavors, juice concentrates, glucose, sugar,
sucralose, milk, cream, protein, coffee, tea, cocoa, supplement ingredients and other packaging materials, the costs
and availability of which are subject to fluctuations. For certain flavors purchased from third-party suppliers and

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used in a limited number of our Monster Energy® brand energy drinks and/or our Strategic Brands energy drinks,
these third-party flavor suppliers own the proprietary rights to certain of their flavor formulas. We do not have
possession of the list of such flavor ingredients or formulas used in the production of certain of our products and
certain of our blended concentrates, and we may be unable to obtain comparable flavors or concentrates from
alternative suppliers on short notice. Our third-party flavor suppliers generally do not make such flavors and/or
blended concentrates available to other third-party customers. We have identified alternative suppliers for certain
of the ingredients contained in many of our beverages. However, industry-wide shortages of certain flavor
ingredients, flavors, fruits and fruit juices, coffee, tea, cocoa, dairy-based products, packaging materials (including
aluminum cans) supplement ingredients and sweeteners have been, and could from time to time in the future be,
encountered, which could interfere with and/or delay production of certain of our products. In addition, certain of
our co-packing arrangements allow such co-packers to increase their fees based on certain of their own cost
increases. We are uncertain whether the prices of any of the above or any other raw materials or ingredients, many
of which have recently risen significantly, will continue to rise or may rise in the future. We are unsure whether we
will be able to pass any of such increases on to our customers. Although we generally do not use hedging agreements
or alternative instruments to manage the risks associated with securing sufficient ingredients or raw materials, from
time to time, we, through our aluminum can suppliers, enter into purchase agreements for the purchase of aluminum,
as well as enter into purchase agreements for portions of our annual anticipated requirements for certain of our other
raw materials such as glucose, sugar and sucralose. In recent years, the United States has imposed tariffs on steel
and aluminum as well as on goods imported from certain countries. Additional tariffs imposed by the United States
on a broader range of imports, or further trade measures taken by other countries, could result in an increase in
supply chain costs.
Our failure to accurately estimate demand for our products or maintain sufficient inventory levels could adversely
affect our business and financial results.
We may not correctly estimate demand for our existing products and/or new products. Our ability to
estimate demand for our products is imprecise, particularly with regard to new products, and may be less precise
during periods of rapid growth, including in new markets. If we materially underestimate demand for our products
or are unable to secure sufficient ingredients or raw materials including, but not limited to, aluminum cans,
aluminum cap cans, sleek aluminum cans, aluminum cans with re-sealable ends, PET plastic bottles, caps, labels,
sucralose, flavor ingredients, flavors, supplement ingredients, juice concentrates, certain sweeteners, coffee, tea,
cocoa, protein and packaging materials or experience difficulties with our co-packing arrangements, including
production shortages or quality issues, we might not be able to satisfy demand on a short-term basis. Moreover,
industry-wide shortages of certain juice concentrates, supplement ingredients and sweeteners have been and could,
from time to time in the future, be experienced, resulting in production fluctuations and/or product shortages. We
generally do not use hedging agreements or alternative instruments to manage this risk. Such shortages could
interfere with and/or delay production of certain of our products and could have a material adverse effect on our
business and financial results.
If we do not accurately anticipate the future demand for a particular product or the time it will take to obtain
new inventory, our inventory levels may be inadequate and our results of operations may be negatively impacted.
If we fail to meet our shipping schedules, we could damage our relationships with distributors and/or retailers,
increase our distribution costs and/or cause sales opportunities to be delayed or lost. In order to be able to deliver
our products on a timely basis, we need to maintain adequate inventory levels of the desired products. If the
inventory of our products held by our distributors and/or retailers is too high, they will not place orders for additional
products, which could unfavorably impact our future sales and adversely affect our operating results.
The costs of packaging supplies, ocean and domestic freight, and inflation generally may adversely affect our results
of operations.
Many of our packaging supply contracts allow our suppliers to alter the costs they charge us for packaging
supplies based on changes in the costs of the underlying commodities that are used to produce those packaging

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supplies, such as aluminum for cans, PET plastic for bottles and pulp and paper for cartons and/or trays. These
changes in the prices we pay for our packaging supplies occur at certain predetermined times that vary by product
and supplier. In some cases, we are able to fix the prices of certain packaging supplies and/or commodities for a
reasonable period. In other cases, we bear the risk of increases in the costs of these packaging supplies, including
the underlying costs of the commodities that comprise these packaging supplies. We do not use derivative
instruments to manage this risk. Recently, inflation has affected, and continues to affect, our raw materials costs,
commodities and other inputs globally. If the costs of packaging supplies and other costs, as well as ocean and
domestic freight rates, continue to increase, we may be unable to pass these costs along to our customers through
corresponding adjustments to the prices we charge, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of
operations.
Global or regional catastrophic events could impact our operations and affect our ability to grow our business.
Because of our increasingly global presence, our business could be affected by unstable political conditions,
civil unrest, protests and demonstrations, large-scale terrorist acts, especially those directed against the United States
or other major industrialized countries where our products are distributed, the outbreak or escalation of armed
hostilities, major natural disasters and extreme weather conditions, such as hurricanes, wildfires, tornados,
earthquakes or floods, or widespread outbreaks of infectious diseases (such as the COVID-19 pandemic). Such
catastrophic events could impact our operations and our supply chain, including the production and/or distribution
of our products. Materials and/or personnel may need to mobilize to other locations. Our headquarters and a large
part of our operations are located in California, a state at greater risk of earthquakes and wildfires. Some of the raw
materials we use, including certain sizes of cans, are available from limited suppliers, and a regional catastrophic
event impacting such suppliers could adversely impact our operations. In addition, such events could disrupt global
or regional economic activity, which could affect consumer purchasing power and consumers’ ability to purchase
our products, thereby reducing demand for our products. If our operations are disrupted or we are unable to grow
our business as a result of these factors, our growth rate could decline and our business, financial condition and
results of operations could be adversely affected.
Climate change and natural disasters may affect our business.
There is concern that a gradual increase in global average temperatures due to increased carbon dioxide and
other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere could cause significant changes in weather patterns around the globe and
an increase in the frequency and severity of natural disasters. Changing weather patterns could result in decreased
agricultural productivity in certain regions, and/or outbreaks of diseases or other health issues, which may limit
availability and/or increase the cost of certain key ingredients, juice concentrates, supplements and other ingredients
used in our products and could impact the food security of communities around the world. Increased frequency or
duration of extreme weather conditions could also impair production capabilities, disrupt our supply chain and/or
impact demand for our products.
Natural disasters and extreme weather conditions, such as hurricanes, wildfires, earthquakes or floods, and
outbreaks of diseases (such as the COVID-19 pandemic) or other health issues may affect our operations and the
operation of our supply chain, impact the operations of our bottlers/distributors and unfavorably impact our
consumers’ ability to purchase our products. The predicted effects of climate change may also result in challenges
regarding availability and quality of water, or less favorable pricing for water, which could adversely impact our
business and results of operations. In addition, public expectations for reductions in greenhouse gas emissions could
result in increased energy, transportation and raw material costs, and may require us to make additional investments
in facilities and equipment. Changes in applicable laws, regulations, standards or practices related to greenhouse
gas emissions, packaging and water scarcity, as well as initiatives by advocacy groups in favor of certain climate
change-related laws, regulations, standards or practices, may result in increased compliance costs, capital
expenditures and other financial obligations, which could affect our business, financial condition and results of
operations. Sales of our products may also be influenced to some extent by weather conditions in the markets in
which we operate. We, our bottlers and our contract packers, use a number of key ingredients in the manufacture

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of our beverage products that are derived from agricultural commodities such as sugar, coffee, tea and cocoa.
Increased demand for food products and decreased agricultural productivity in certain regions of the world as a
result of changing weather patterns and other factors may limit the availability or increase the cost of such
agricultural commodities and could impact the food security of communities around the world. Weather conditions
may influence consumer demand for certain of our beverages, which could have an effect on our operations, either
positively or negatively.
If we are not able to retain the services of our workforce, there may be an adverse effect on our operations and/or
our operating performance until we find suitable replacements.
Our business is dependent, to a large extent, upon the services of our workforce. We do not maintain key
person life insurance on any members of our senior management. The loss of services of either Rodney Sacks,
Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer, Hilton Schlosberg, Vice Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer, or
any other key members of our senior management could adversely affect our business until suitable replacements
can be found. There may be a limited number of personnel with the requisite skills to serve in these positions, and
we may be unable to locate or employ such qualified personnel on acceptable terms.
Negative publicity (whether or not warranted) could damage our brand image and corporate reputation, and may
cause our business to suffer.
Our success depends on our ability to build and maintain the brand image for our existing products, new
products and brand extensions and maintain our corporate reputation. There can be no assurance that our advertising,
marketing and promotional programs and our commitment to product safety and quality, human rights and
environmental sustainability will have the desired impact on our products’ brand image and on consumer
preferences and demand. Claims regarding product safety, quality and/or ingredient content issues, efficacy or lack
thereof (real or imagined), our culture and our workforce, our environmental impact and the sustainability of our
operations, or allegations of product contamination, even if false or unfounded, could tarnish the image of our
brands and may cause consumers to choose other products. Consumer demand for our products could diminish
significantly if we, our employees, bottlers/distributors, suppliers or business partners fail to preserve the quality of
our products, act or are perceived to act in an unethical, illegal, discriminatory, unequal or socially irresponsible
manner, including with respect to the sourcing, content or sale of our products, service and treatment of our
customers, or the use of customer data. Furthermore, our brand image or perceived product quality could be
adversely affected by litigation, unfavorable reports in the media (internet or elsewhere), studies in general and
regulatory or other governmental inquiries (in each case whether involving our products or those of our competitors)
and proposed or new legislation affecting our industry. Negative postings or comments on social media or
networking websites about the Company or any one of our brands, even if inaccurate or malicious, could generate
adverse publicity that could damage the reputation of our brands or the Company. Business incidents, whether
isolated or recurring and whether originating from us, our bottlers/distributors, suppliers or business partners, that
erode consumer trust can significantly reduce brand value or potentially trigger boycotts of our products and can
have a negative impact on consumer demand for our products as well as our reputation and financial results. The
impact of such incidents may be exacerbated if they receive considerable publicity, including rapidly through social
or digital media (including for malicious reasons) or result in litigation.
In addition, from time to time, there are public policy endeavors that are either directly related to our
products and packaging or to our business. These public policy debates can occasionally be the subject of backlash
from advocacy groups that have a differing point of view and could result in adverse media and consumer reaction,
including product boycotts. Similarly, our sponsorship relationships could subject us to negative publicity as a result
of actual or alleged misconduct by individuals or entities associated with organizations we sponsor or support.
Likewise, campaigns by activists connecting us, or our supply chain, with human and workplace rights,
environmental or animal rights issues could adversely impact our corporate image and reputation. We have made a
number of commitments to respect human rights, including the policies and initiatives described in our California
Transparency in Supply Chains Act & United Kingdom Modern Slavery Act statement. Allegations, even if untrue,

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that we are not respecting the human rights found in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights;
actual or perceived failure by our suppliers or other business partners to comply with applicable labor and workplace
rights laws, including child labor laws, or their actual or perceived abuse or misuse of migrant workers; adverse
publicity surrounding obesity and health concerns related to our products, water usage, our environmental impact
and the sustainability of our operations, labor relations, our culture and our workforce or the like could negatively
affect our Company’s overall reputation and brand image, which in turn could have a negative impact on our
products’ acceptance by consumers.
Government Regulation and Litigation Risks
Changes in government regulation, or failure to comply with existing regulations, could adversely affect our
business, financial condition and results of operations.
Legislation has been proposed and/or adopted at the U.S. federal, state and/or municipal level and proposed
and/or adopted in certain foreign jurisdictions to restrict the sale of energy drinks (including, prohibiting the sale of
energy drinks at certain establishments or pursuant to certain governmental programs), limit the content of caffeine
and other ingredients in beverages, require certain product labeling disclosures and/or warnings, impose excise
taxes, limit product size or impose age restrictions for the sale of energy drinks. For a discussion of certain of such
legislation, see “Part I, Item 1 – Business – Government Regulation.” Furthermore, additional legislation may be
introduced in the United States and other countries at the federal, state, local, municipal and supranational level in
respect of each of the foregoing subject areas. Public health officials and health advocates are increasingly focused
on the public health consequences associated with obesity, especially as it affects children, and are seeking
legislative change to reduce the consumption of sweetened beverages. There also has been increased focus on
caffeine content in beverages, and we are seeing some attention to other ingredients in energy drinks. To the extent
any such legislation is enacted in one or more jurisdictions where a significant amount of our products are sold,
individually or in the aggregate, it could result in a reduction in demand for, or availability of, our energy drinks,
and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
The production, distribution and sale in the United States of many of our products are also currently subject
to various federal and state regulations, including, but not limited to: the FD&C Act; the Occupational Safety and
Health Act; various environmental statutes; data privacy laws; California Proposition 65; and various other federal,
state and local statutes and regulations applicable to the production, transportation, sale, safety, advertising,
labeling, packaging and ingredients of such products.
Outside the United States, the production, distribution and sale of many of our products are also subject to
numerous statutes and regulations.
If a regulatory authority finds that a current or future product, its label, or a production run is not in
compliance with any of these regulations, we may be fined, or the products in question may have to be recalled,
removed from the market, reformulated and/or have the packaging changed, which could adversely affect our
business, financial condition and results of operations.
Significant changes to or failure to comply with various environmental laws may expose us to liability and/or cause
certain of our facilities to close, relocate or operate at reduced production levels, which could adversely affect our
business, financial condition and results of operations.
We, and our co-packers, are subject to a wide and increasingly broad array of federal, state, regional, local,
and international environmental laws, including statutes and regulations, which aim to regulate emissions and
impacts to air, land, and water. Our operations may result in odors, noise, or other pollutants being emitted from
our facilities. Failure to comply with these environmental laws or any future changes to them could result in alleged
harm to our employees or others near our facilities, significant costs to satisfy environmental compliance,
remediation or compensatory requirements, or the imposition of penalties or restrictions on operations by
governmental agencies or courts. In 2021, an AFF facility, which manufactures the primary flavors for our Monster

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Energy® Drinks segment, received notices of violation for emitting odors and for failing to properly permit its
equipment. Failure to comply with the notices and remediate certain emissions at this facility, or other facilities,
may result in penalties, liability for damages, alterations to our facilities’ operations, or the closing or relocation of
a facility. Such actions may result in flavor shortages, which could in turn result in shortages for our finished
products and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Increasing concern over environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) matters, including climate change,
will likely result in new or revised laws and regulations aimed at reducing or mitigating the potential effects of
greenhouse gases, restricting or increasing the costs of commercial water use due to local water scarcity concerns,
or increasing mandatory reporting of certain ESG metrics, such as recycling. If we fail to comply with applicable
environmental compliance mandates or fail to meet sustainability metrics, our business operations and our
reputation could be adversely impacted.
We cannot predict the effect of possible inquiries from and/or actions by attorneys general, other government
agencies and/or quasi-government agencies into the production, advertising, marketing, promotion, labeling,
ingredients, usage and/or sale of our energy drink products.
We are subject to the risks of investigations and/or enforcement actions by state attorneys general and/or
other government and/or quasi-governmental agencies relating to the advertising, marketing, promotion,
ingredients, usage and/or sale of our energy drinks, and we are a party, from time to time, to various government
and regulatory inquiries and/or proceedings. Defending these proceedings can result in significant ongoing
expenditures and the diversion of our management’s time and attention from the operation of our business, which
could have a negative effect on our business operations.
In addition, from time to time, government and/or quasi-governmental agencies may investigate the safety
of caffeine and other ingredients in energy drinks. If an inquiry by a state attorney general or other government or
quasi-government agency finds that our products and/or the advertising, marketing, promotion, ingredients, usage
and/or sale of such products are not in compliance with applicable laws or regulations, we may become subject to
fines, product reformulations, container changes, changes in the usage or sale of our energy drink products and/or
changes in our advertising, marketing and promotion practices, each of which could have an adverse effect on our
business, financial condition or results of operations.
Litigation regarding our products, and related unfavorable media attention, could expose us to significant liabilities
and reduce demand for our products, thus negatively affecting our financial results.
We have been and are a party, from time to time, to various litigation claims and legal proceedings,
including, but not limited to, intellectual property, fraud, unfair business practices, false advertising, product
liability, breach of contract claims, claims from prior distributors, labor and employment matters, personal injury
matters, consumer class actions, securities actions and shareholder derivative actions.
Other lawsuits have been filed against us claiming that certain statements made in our advertisements and/or
on the labels of our products were false and/or misleading or otherwise not in compliance with food standards under
local law, and/or that our products are not safe. Putative class action lawsuits have also been filed against certain of
our competitors asserting that certain claims in their advertisements amount to false advertising. We do not believe
any statements made by us in our promotional materials or set forth on our product labels are false or misleading or
noncompliant with local law, or that our products are in any way unsafe, and we vigorously defend such lawsuits.
Any of the foregoing matters or other litigation, the threat thereof, or unfavorable media attention arising
from pending or threatened product-related litigation could consume significant financial and managerial resources
and result in decreased demand for our products, significant monetary awards against us, an injunction barring the
sale of any of our products and injury to our reputation. Our failure to successfully defend or settle any litigation or
legal proceedings could result in liabilities that, to the extent not covered by our insurance, could have a material

36
adverse effect on our financial condition, revenue and profitability, and could cause the market value of our common
stock to decline.
If we encounter material product recalls, our business may suffer material losses and such recalls could damage
our brand image and corporate reputation, also resulting in material losses.
We may be required from time to time to recall products entirely or from specific co-packers, markets,
retailers or batches or reformulate certain of our products if such products become contaminated, damaged,
mislabeled, defective or otherwise materially non-compliant with applicable regulatory requirements. A material
product recall could adversely affect our profitability and our brand image and corporate reputation. We do not
maintain recall insurance.
Intellectual Property, Information Technology and Data Privacy Risks
Our intellectual property rights are critical to our success, and the loss of such rights could materially adversely
affect our business.
We own numerous trademarks that are very important to our business. We also own the copyright in, and
to, a portion of the content on the packaging of our products. We regard our trademarks, copyrights and similar
intellectual property as critical to our success and attempt to protect such intellectual property through registration
and enforcement actions. However, there can be no assurance that other parties will not infringe or misappropriate
our trademarks, copyrights and similar proprietary rights. We also have been, and may in the future be, unable to
use our trademarks, trade names or designs and/or trade dress in certain countries, which may impact sales of the
affected brands and require increased expenditures, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial
condition or results of operations.
We must continually maintain, monitor, protect and/or upgrade our information technology systems, including
protecting us from internal and external cybersecurity threats.
Information technology enables us to operate efficiently, interface with customers, maintain financial
accuracy and efficiency and accurately produce our financial statements. If we do not appropriately allocate and
effectively manage the resources necessary to build and sustain the proper technology infrastructure, we could be
subject to transaction errors, processing inefficiencies, the loss of customers, business disruptions, and/or the loss
of and/or damage to intellectual property through security breaches, including internal and external cybersecurity
threats. Cybersecurity attacks are evolving, may be difficult to detect for periods of time, and include, but are not
limited to, malicious software (malware, ransomware and viruses), phishing and social engineering, attempts to
gain unauthorized access to networks, computer systems and data, malicious or negligent actions of employees
(including misuse of information they are entitled to access), cyber extortion and other forms of electronic security
breaches. Such attacks could lead to disruptions in or loss of access to our data or business systems, an inability to
process customer orders and/or lost customer orders, unauthorized release of confidential or otherwise protected
information, lost revenues or other costs due to office, plant, warehouse or other facility disruption or shutdown,
and corruption of data.
We rely on relationships with third parties, including suppliers, distributors, bottlers, contract packers,
contractors, cloud data storage and other information technology service providers and other external business
partners, for certain functions or for services in support of our operations. These third-party service providers and
partners, with whom we may share data, are subject to similar risks as we are relating to cybersecurity, privacy
violations, business interruption, and systems, as well as employee failures. While we have procedures in place for
selecting and managing our relationships with third-party service providers and other business partners, we do not
have control over their business operations or governance and compliance systems, practices and procedures, which
increases our financial, legal, reputational and operational risk. These third parties may experience cybersecurity
incidents that may involve data we share with them or rely on them to provide to us, and the need to coordinate

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with such third-parties, including with respect to timely notification and access to personnel and information
concerning an incident, may complicate our efforts to resolve any issues that arise.
However, given the unpredictability of the timing, nature and scope of such disruptions, we could
potentially be subject to operational interruption, damage to our brand image and private data exposure.
Moreover, if our data management systems, including our SAP enterprise resource planning system, do not
effectively collect, store, process and report relevant data for the operation of our business (whether due to
equipment malfunction or constraints, software deficiencies, cybersecurity attack and/or human error), our ability
to effectively plan, forecast and execute our business plan and comply with applicable laws and regulations will be
impaired, perhaps materially. Any such impairment could materially and adversely affect our financial condition,
results of operations, cash flows and the timeliness with which we report our internal and external operating results.
If we fail to comply with data privacy and personal data protection laws, we could be subject to adverse publicity,
government enforcement actions and/or private litigation, which may negatively impact our business and operating
results.
We receive, process, transmit and store information relating to certain identified or identifiable individuals
(“personal data”), including current and former employees, in the ordinary course of business. As a result, we are
subject to various U.S. federal and state and foreign laws and regulations relating to personal data. These laws are
subject to change, and new personal data legislation may be enacted in other jurisdictions at any time. In the
European Union, the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) became effective in May 2018 for all member
states. The GDPR includes operational requirements for companies receiving or processing personal data of
residents of the European Union different from those that were previously in place and also includes significant
penalties for noncompliance. Additionally, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (“CCPA”), which was
enacted in June 2018 and came into effect on January 1, 2020, provides a new private right of action and statutory
damages for certain data breaches and imposes operational requirements on companies that process personal data
of California residents, including making new disclosures to consumers about data collection, processing and
sharing practices and allowing consumers to opt out of certain data sharing with third parties.
Changes introduced by the GDPR and the CCPA, as well as other changes to existing personal data
protection laws and the introduction of such laws in other jurisdictions, subject the Company to, among other things,
additional costs and expenses and may require costly changes to our business practices and security systems,
policies, procedures and practices. There can be no assurances that our security controls over personal data, training
of personnel on data privacy and data security, vendor management processes, and the policies, procedures and
practices we implement will prevent the improper processing or breaches of personal data. Data breaches or
improper processing, or breaches of personal data in violation of the GDPR, the CCPA and/or of other personal
data protection or privacy laws and regulations, could harm our reputation, cause loss of consumer confidence,
subject us to government enforcement actions (including fines), or result in private litigation against us, which may
result in potential loss of revenue, increased costs, liability for monetary damages or fines and/or criminal
prosecution, thereby negatively impacting our business and operating results.
Financial Risks
Fluctuations in our effective tax rate could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
We are subject to income and other taxes in both the U.S. and certain foreign jurisdictions. Therefore, we
are subject to audits for multiple tax years in various jurisdictions at once.
We are in various stages of examination with certain states and certain foreign jurisdictions, including the
United Kingdom and Ireland. Our 2018 through 2020 U.S. federal income tax returns are subject to examination by
the IRS. Our state income tax returns are subject to examination for the 2017 through 2020 tax years.

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At any given time, events may occur which change our expectation about how any such tax audits will be
resolved and thus, there could be significant variability in our quarterly and/or annual tax rates, because these events
may change our plans for uncertain tax positions.
Changes in U.S. tax laws as a result of any legislation proposed by the new U.S. Presidential Administration
or U.S. Congress, which may include efforts to change or repeal the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and the federal
corporate income tax rate reduction, could adversely affect our provision for income taxes, resulting in an adverse
impact on our financial condition or results of operations. In addition, changes in the manner in which U.S.
multinational corporations are taxed on foreign earnings, including changes in how existing tax laws are interpreted
or enforced, could adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations. For example, the Organization
for Economic Cooperation and Development (“OECD”) has recommended changes to numerous long-standing
international tax principles through its base erosion and profit shifting (“BEPS”) project. These changes, to the
extent adopted, may increase tax uncertainty, result in higher compliance costs and adversely affect our provision
for income taxes, results of operations and/or cash flow. In connection with the OECD’s BEPS project, companies
are required to disclose more information to tax authorities on operations around the world, which may lead to
greater audit scrutiny of profits earned in various countries. Economic and political pressures to increase tax
revenues in jurisdictions in which we operate, or the adoption of new or reformed tax legislation or regulation, may
make resolving tax disputes more difficult and the final resolution of tax audits and any related litigation could
differ from our historical provisions and accruals, resulting in an adverse impact on our financial condition or results
of operations.
We may be required in the future to record a significant charge to earnings if our goodwill or intangible assets
become impaired.
Under United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”), we are required to review our
intangible assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be
recoverable. Factors that may be considered a change in circumstances indicating that the carrying value of our
intangible assets may not be recoverable include, declining or slower than anticipated growth rates for certain of
our existing products, a decline in stock price and market capitalization, and slower growth rates in our industry.
We may be required in the future to record a significant charge to earnings during the period in which we
determine that our intangible assets have been impaired. Any such charge would adversely impact our results of
operations. As of December 31, 2021, our goodwill totaled approximately $1.33 billion and other intangible assets
totaled approximately $1.07 billion.
Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates may adversely affect our operating results.
We are exposed to foreign currency exchange rate risk with respect to our sales, expenses, profits, assets
and liabilities denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. We enter into forward currency exchange
contracts with financial institutions to create an economic hedge to specifically manage a portion of the foreign
exchange risk exposure associated with certain consolidated subsidiaries’ non-functional currency denominated
assets and liabilities. We have not used instruments to hedge against all foreign currency risks and are therefore not
protected against all foreign currency fluctuations. As a result, our reported earnings may be affected by changes in
foreign currency exchange rates. Moreover, any favorable impacts to profit margins or financial results from
fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates are likely to be unsustainable over time. For the years ended
December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, aggregate foreign currency transaction gains (losses), including the gains or
losses on forward currency exchange contracts, amounted to $0.3 million, ($11.2) million and ($4.1) million,
respectively.
Potential changes in accounting standards or practices and/or taxation may adversely affect our financial results.
We cannot predict the impact that future changes in accounting standards or practices may have on our
financial results. New accounting standards could be issued that change the way we record revenues, expenses,
assets and liabilities. These changes in accounting standards could adversely affect our reported earnings. Increases

39
in direct and indirect income tax rates could affect after-tax income. Equally, increases in indirect taxes (including
environmental taxes pertaining to the disposal of beverage containers and/or indirect taxes on beverages generally
or energy drinks in particular) could affect our products’ affordability and reduce our sales.
If we fail to maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting on
a consolidated basis, our stock price and investor confidence in the Company could be materially and adversely
affected.
We are required to maintain both disclosure controls and procedures as well as internal control over
financial reporting that are effective for the purposes described in “Part II, Item 9A – Controls and Procedures.” If
we fail to maintain such controls and procedures, our business, results of operations, financial condition and/or the
value of our stock could be materially harmed.
Uncertainty in the financial markets and other adverse changes in general economic or political conditions in any
of the major countries in which we do business could adversely affect our industry, business and results of
operations.
Global economic uncertainties, including highly inflationary economies and foreign currency exchange
rates, affect businesses such as ours in a number of ways, making it difficult to accurately forecast and plan our
future business activities. There can be no assurance that economic improvements will occur, or that they would be
sustainable, or that they would enhance conditions in markets relevant to us. In addition, we cannot predict the
duration and severity of disruptions in any of our markets or the impact they may have on our customers or business,
as our expansion outside of the United States has increased our exposure to any developments or crises in African,
Asian, European and other international markets. Unfavorable economic conditions and financial uncertainties in
our major international markets and unstable political conditions, including civil unrest and governmental changes,
in certain of our other international markets could undermine global consumer confidence and reduce consumers’
purchasing power, thereby reducing demand for our products. Included in the foregoing are long-term uncertainties
surrounding the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union on January 31, 2020 (commonly referred
to as “Brexit”) and any resulting increases in tariffs, importation restrictions, out of stocks, volatility in currency
exchange rates, including the valuation of the euro and the British pound in particular, changes in the laws and
regulations applied in the United Kingdom or impacts on economic and market conditions in the United Kingdom,
the European Union and its member states and elsewhere.
Default by or failure of one or more of our counterparty financial institutions could cause us to incur significant
losses.
As part of any hedging activities that we may conduct, we may enter into transactions involving derivative
financial instruments, including forward contracts, commodity futures contracts, option contracts, collars and
swaps, with various financial institutions. We also have significant amounts of cash, cash equivalents and other
investments on deposit or in accounts with banks or other financial institutions both in the United States and abroad,
exposing us to risk of default by or failure of such counterparty financial institutions. This risk of counterparty
default or failure is greater during periods of economic downturn or uncertainty in financial markets. If one of our
counterparties became insolvent or filed for bankruptcy, our ability to recover losses incurred due to the default or
to retrieve assets deposited or held in accounts with such counterparty may be limited by the counterparty’s liquidity
or applicable laws governing insolvency and bankruptcy proceedings. Default by or failure of one or more of our
counterparties could cause us to incur significant losses and negatively impact our results of operations and financial
condition.
Volatility of stock price may restrict sale opportunities.
Our stock price is affected by a number of factors, including stockholder expectations, financial results, the
introduction of new products by us and our competitors, general economic and market conditions such as inflation,
estimates and projections by the investment community and public comments by other parties as well as many other

40
factors including litigation, many of which are beyond our control. We do not provide guidance on our future
performance, including, but not limited to, our revenues, margins, product mix, operating expenses or net income.
We may be unable to achieve analysts’ net revenue and/or earnings forecasts, which are based on their own
projected revenues, sales volumes and sales mix of many product types and/or new products, certain of which are
more profitable than others, as well as their own estimates of gross margin and operating expenses. There can be
no assurance that we will achieve any such projected levels or mix of product sales, revenues, gross margins,
operating profits and/or net income. As a result, our stock price is subject to significant volatility, and stockholders
may not be able to sell our stock at attractive prices. In addition, periods of volatility in the market price of our stock
could result in the initiation of securities class action litigation against us. During the fiscal year ended December
31, 2021, the high of our stock price was $99.89 and the low was $80.92.
Our investments are subject to risks which may cause losses and affect the liquidity of these investments.
At December 31, 2021, we had $1.33 billion in cash and cash equivalents, $1.75 billion in short-term
investments and $99.4 million in long-term investments, including certificates of deposit, commercial paper, U.S.
government agency securities, U.S. treasuries, and to a lesser extent, municipal securities. Certain of these
investments are subject to general credit, liquidity, market and interest rate risks. These risks associated with our
investment portfolio may have an adverse effect on our future results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
Not applicable.
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
As of February 16, 2022, our principal properties include our corporate headquarters as well as our Southern
California warehouse and distribution center.
Our owned corporate facilities located in Corona, California, consist of (i) an approximately 141,000
square-foot, free-standing, six-story building (LEED Gold and ENERGY STAR certified), (ii) an approximately
147,625 square-foot three-story parking structure and storage facility, which houses our approximately 14,000
square-foot quality control laboratory, (iii) an approximately 75,426 square foot, free-standing, three-story building
(currently pursuing ENERGY STAR certification), (iv) an approximately 20,661 square-foot, free-standing, singlestory building and (v) an approximately 49,617 square-foot, free-standing, two-story building.
Our owned Southern California warehouse and distribution center is located in Rialto, California, consisting
of an approximately 1,000,000 square-foot building which is LEED certified.
During 2020, we purchased a three-story office building located in Uxbridge, United Kingdom.
During 2019, we acquired a manufacturing plant and adjoining land in Athy, County Kildare, Ireland to
produce and supply ingredients, including flavors, for certain of our international markets.
During 2019, we purchased approximately 7.66 acres of land in San Fernando, California. We are in the
process of constructing a new production facility thereon to consolidate AFF’s operations into a single location.
In addition, we lease many smaller office and/or warehouse spaces, both domestically and in certain
international locations.
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
From time to time in the normal course of business, the Company is named in litigation, including labor
and employment matters, personal injury matters, consumer class actions, intellectual property matters and claims

41
from prior distributors. Although it is not possible to predict the ultimate outcome of such litigation, based on the
facts known to the Company, management believes that such litigation in aggregate will likely not have a material
adverse effect on the Company’s financial position or results of operations.
The Company evaluates, on a quarterly basis, developments in legal proceedings and other matters that
could cause an increase or decrease in the amount of the liability that is accrued, if any, and any related insurance
reimbursements. As of December 31, 2021, no loss contingencies were included in the Company’s consolidated
balance sheet.
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.
PART II
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER
MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Principal Market
The Company’s common stock trades on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol, “MNST”. As
of February 16, 2022, there were 529,358,860 shares of the Company’s common stock outstanding held by
approximately 189 holders of record. The holders of record do not include those stockholders whose shares are held
of record by banks, brokers and other financial institutions.
Stock Price and Dividend Information
We have not paid cash dividends to our stockholders since our inception and do not anticipate paying cash
dividends in the foreseeable future.
On March 13, 2020, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized a new share repurchase program for the
purchase of up to $500.0 million of the Company’s outstanding common stock (the “March 2020 Repurchase
Plan”). During the year ended December 31, 2021, no shares were purchased under the March 2020 Repurchase
Plan. As of February 28, 2022, $441.5 million remained available for repurchase under the March 2020 Repurchase
Plan.
During the year ended December 31, 2021, 0.2 million shares of common stock were purchased from
employees in lieu of cash payments for options exercised or withholding taxes due for a total amount of $13.8
million. While such purchases are considered common stock repurchases, they are not counted as purchases against
the Company’s authorized share repurchase programs. Such shares are included in common stock in treasury in the
accompanying consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2021.
No shares were repurchased during the quarter ended December 31, 2021.

42
Performance Graph
The following graph shows a five-year comparison of cumulative total returns:1
1Annual return assumes reinvestment of dividends. Cumulative total return assumes an initial investment of $100 on December 31, 2016.
The Company’s self-selected peer group is comprised of TCCC, Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, Inc. (through July 9, 2018), Keurig Dr. Pepper
Inc. (after July 10, 2018), National Beverage Corporation, Jones Soda Company and PepsiCo, Inc.
ITEM 6. [RESERVED]
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The following Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
(“MD&A”) is provided as a supplement to – and should be read in conjunction with – our financial statements and
the accompanying notes (“Notes”) included in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K. This discussion contains forwardlooking statements that are based on management’s current expectations, estimates and projections about our
business and operations. Our actual results may differ materially from those currently anticipated and expressed in
such forward-looking statements. See “Forward-Looking Statements” and “Part I, Item 1A – Risk Factors.”
This overview provides our perspective on the individual sections of MD&A. MD&A includes the
following sections:
The COVID-19 Pandemic – a discussion of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business
employees and operations;

43
Our Business – a general description of our business, the value drivers of our business, and
opportunities and risks facing our Company, stock repurchases, acquisitions and divestitures;
Results of Operations – an analysis of our consolidated results of operations for the years ended
December 31, 2021 and 2020;
Sales – details of our sales measured on a quarterly basis in both dollars and cases;
Inflation – information about the impact that inflation may or may not have on our results;
Liquidity and Capital Resources – an analysis of our cash flows, sources and uses of cash and
contractual obligations;
Accounting Policies and Pronouncements – a discussion of accounting policies that require critical
judgments and estimates including newly issued accounting pronouncements;
Forward-Looking Statements – cautionary information about forward-looking statements and a
description of certain risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from
the Company’s historical results or our current expectations or projections; and
Market Risks – information about market risks and risk management. (See “Forward-Looking
Statements” and “Part II, Item 7A – Qualitative and Quantitative Disclosures about Market Risks”).
The COVID – 19 Pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has directly and indirectly impacted our business. The duration and severity of
this impact will depend on future developments that are highly uncertain and cannot be accurately predicted,
including new information regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the emergence of new variants, the actions
taken to limit its spread and the economic impact on local, regional, national and international markets. See “Part I,
Item 1A – Risk Factors.”
We continue to address the COVID-19 pandemic with a global task force team working to mitigate the
potential impacts on our people and business.
We are incredibly proud of the teamwork exhibited by our employees, co-packers and bottlers/distributors
around the world who are endeavoring to maintain the integrity of our supply chain. Despite the ongoing impact of
the COVID-19 pandemic, we achieved record annual net sales in 2021.
As countries continue to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, and as governments and/or local authorities
impose regulations regarding COVID-19 testing, vaccine mandates and related workplace restrictions, there
remains a risk that the COVID-19 pandemic may continue to impact our business and supply chain, including our
ability to recruit and/or retain our employees as well as impact our co-packers, bottlers/distributors and/or suppliers.
A reduction in demand for our products or changes in consumer purchasing and consumption patterns, as
well as continued economic uncertainty as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, could adversely affect the financial
conditions of retailers and consumers, resulting in reduced or canceled orders for our products, purchase returns
and closings of retail or wholesale establishments or other locations in which our products are sold.
Our Distribution and Supply Chain
In 2021, we experienced a number of global supply chain challenges as a result of unanticipated increases
in demand, in part due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which adversely impacted both cost of sales and operating costs,
and in certain markets, affected the availability of our products on shelves at retailers. In particular, we have
experienced shortages in our aluminum can requirements, freight inefficiencies, shortages of shipping containers,
port of entry congestion, and delays in the receipt and/or availability of certain ingredients. In the United States, we
lacked sufficient co-packing capacity to meet increased demand for certain of our products. We have also
experienced increased aluminum can costs attributable to higher aluminum commodity pricing as well as the costs
of importing aluminum cans. In addition, we experienced increased ingredient and other input costs, including

44
shipping and freight, labor, trucking, fuel, co-packing fees, secondary packaging materials, increased outbound
freight costs and production inefficiencies, which resulted in increased costs of sales and increased operating costs.
We have addressed and will continue to address the controllable challenges in our supply chain, which
remains largely intact. Additional can manufacturing capacity in the United States has been secured for 2022,
although the Company will continue to import aluminum cans to supplement its domestic can supply. Can capacity
in EMEA remains challenging and the Company expects to continue to import aluminum cans into EMEA for at
least 2022. While co-packing capacity in the United States and EMEA also continues to be challenging, we have
expanded our network in the United States and EMEA to substantially address supply constraints. Our flavor facility
in Athy, Ireland is operational, producing certain flavors and blends for the EMEA region, is steadily increasing
production, and is investigating the feasibility of a juice plant to produce EMEA’s juice product requirements. We
continue to implement measures to mitigate our increased operating costs through pricing actions and reductions in
promotions.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
As of the date of this filing, we expect to maintain substantial liquidity as we manage through the current
environment as described in the “Liquidity and Capital Resources” section below.
Our Business
Overview
We develop, market, sell and distribute energy drink beverages and concentrates for energy drink
beverages, primarily under the following brand names:
Monster Energy®
Monster Energy Ultra®
Monster Rehab®
Monster Energy® Nitro
Java Monster®
Muscle Monster®
Espresso Monster®
Punch Monster®
Juice Monster®
Monster Hydro® Energy Water
Monster Hydro® Super Sport
Monster HydroSport Super Fuel®
Monster Super Fuel®
Monster Dragon Tea®
Reign Total Body Fuel®
Reign Inferno® Thermogenic Fuel
NOS®
Full Throttle®
Burn®
Mother®
Nalu®
Ultra Energy®
Play® and Power Play® (stylized)
Relentless®
BPM®
BU®
Gladiator®
Samurai®
Live+®
Predator®
Fury®
True North®
The comparative results of operations for the twelve-months ended December 31, 2020 included a nonrecurring tax benefit of approximately $165.1 million due to an intra-entity transfer of intangible assets between
certain of the Company’s foreign subsidiaries, which resulted in a step-up of the tax-deductible basis in the
transferred assets in a foreign jurisdiction, and created a temporary difference between the tax basis and the book
basis for such intangible assets (the “Non-Recurring Tax Benefit”), as well as reduced marketing, sponsorships and
certain other operating expenses, largely as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. These items should be taken
into consideration when evaluating comparative performance for the twelve-months ended December 31, 2021 as
compared to the twelve-months ended December 31, 2020.

45
Our net sales of $5.5 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021 represented record annual net sales. The
comparative net sales for the year ended December 31, 2020 were negatively impacted by $15.2 million related to
product returns from our customers as a result of a European formulation issue with a limited number of products
in Europe and a labeling issue concerning one product in Japan (the “Product Returns”). Net changes in foreign
currency exchange rates had a favorable impact on net sales of approximately $61.9 million for the year ended
December 31, 2021.
The vast majority of our net sales are derived from our Monster Energy® Drinks segment. Net sales of our
Monster Energy® Drinks segment were $5.22 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021. Net sales of our
Strategic Brands segment were $294.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. Our Monster Energy® Drinks
segment represented 94.2% and 93.6% of our net sales for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020,
respectively. Our Strategic Brands segment represented 5.3% and 5.8% of our net sales for the years ended
December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Our Other segment represented 0.5% and 0.6% of our net sales for the
years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The comparative net sales for the Monster Energy® Drinks
segment for the year ended December 31, 2020 were negatively impacted by $15.2 million related to the Product
Returns.
Net changes in foreign currency exchange rates had a favorable impact on our net sales of the Monster
Energy® Drinks segment of approximately $57.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. Net changes in
foreign currency exchange rates had a favorable impact on net sales in the Strategic Brands segment of
approximately $4.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2021.
Our growth strategy includes expanding our international business. Net sales to customers outside the
United States amounted to $2.04 billion, $1.51 billion and $1.33 billion for the years ended December 31, 2021,
2020 and 2019, respectively. Such sales were approximately 37%, 33% and 32% of net sales for the years ended
December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The comparative net sales to customers outside the United States
for the year ended December 31, 2020 were negatively impacted by $15.2 million related to the Product Returns.
Our customers are primarily full service beverage bottlers/distributors, retail grocery and specialty chains,
wholesalers, club stores, mass merchandisers, convenience chains, foodservice customers, value stores, ecommerce retailers and the military. Percentages of our gross billings to our various customer types for the years
ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 are reflected below. Such information includes sales made by us directly
to the customer types concerned, which include our full service beverage bottlers/distributors in the United States.
Such full service beverage bottlers/distributors in turn sell certain of our products to some of the same customer
types listed below. We limit our description of our customer types to include only our sales to our full service
bottlers/distributors without reference to such bottlers/distributors’ sales to their own customers.
2021 2020 2019

U.S. full service bottlers/distributors
International full service bottlers/distributors
Club stores and e-commerce retailers
Retail grocery, direct convenience, specialty chains and wholesalers
Direct value stores and other
51%
39%
8%
1%
1%
56%
34%
8%
1%
1%
58%
33%
7%
1%
1%

Our customers include Coca-Cola Canada Bottling Limited, Coca-Cola Consolidated, Inc., Coca-Cola
Bottling Company United, Inc., Reyes Coca-Cola Bottling, LLC, Great Lakes Coca-Cola Distribution, LLC, CocaCola Southwest Beverages LLC, The Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England, Inc., Swire Pacific
Holdings, Inc. (USA), Liberty Coca-Cola Beverages, LLC, Coca-Cola Europacific Partners, Coca-Cola Hellenic,
Coca-Cola FEMSA, Coca-Cola Amatil, Swire Coca-Cola (China), COFCO Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola Beverages
Africa, Coca-Cola İçecek and certain other TCCC network bottlers, Asahi Soft Drinks, Co., Ltd., Wal-Mart, Inc.
(including Sam’s Club), Costco Wholesale Corporation and Amazon.com, Inc. A decision by any large customer
to decrease amounts purchased from us or to cease carrying our products could have a material adverse effect on
our financial condition and consolidated results of operations.

46
Coca-Cola Consolidated, Inc. accounted for approximately 12%, 12% and 13% of our net sales for the years
ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Reyes Coca-Cola Bottling, LLC accounted for approximately 10%, 11% and 11% of our net sales for the
years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Coca-Cola Europacific Partners accounted for approximately 12%, 10% and 10% of our net sales for the
years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
We continue to incur expenditures in connection with the development and introduction of new products
and flavors.
CANarchy Acquisition
On February 17, 2022, we completed our acquisition of CANarchy Craft Brewery Collective LLC
(“CANarchy”), a craft beer and hard seltzer company, for $330.0 million in cash, subject to adjustments. The
transaction allows us to enter the alcohol beverage sector and brings the Cigar City family of brands including Jai
Alai IPA and Florida Man IPA, the Oskar Blues family of brands including Dale’s Pale Ale and Wild Basin Hard
Seltzers, the Deep Ellum family of brands including Dallas Blonde and Deep Ellum IPA, the Perrin Brewing family
of brands including Black Ale, the Squatters family of brands including Hop Rising Double IPA and Juicy IPA and
the Wasatch family of brands including Apricot Hefeweizen to our beverage portfolio. The transaction does not
include CANarchy’s stand-alone restaurants. Our organizational structure for our existing energy beverage business
will remain unchanged. CANarchy will function independently, retaining its own organizational structure and team.
Value Drivers of our Business
We believe that the key value drivers of our business include the following:
International Growth – The introduction, development and sustained profitability of our brands
internationally remains a key value driver for our corporate growth. One or more of our products are
distributed in approximately 154 countries and territories worldwide.
Profitable Growth – We believe “functional” value-added beverage brands supported by marketing and
innovation and targeted to a diverse consumer base, drive profitable growth. We are focused on
increasing the profit margins for both our Monster Energy® Drinks segment and our Strategic Brands
segment, and believe that tailored branding, packaging, pricing and distribution channel strategies help
achieve profitable growth. We are implementing these strategies with a view to continuing profitable
growth.
Cost Management – The principal focus of cost management will continue to be on mitigating increases
and/or reducing input procurement and production costs on a per-case basis, including raw material
costs and co-packing fees, as well as reducing freight costs by securing additional co-packing facilities
strategically localized. Another key area of focus is to decrease promotional allowances, selling and
general and administrative costs, including sponsorships, sampling, promotional and marketing
expenses, as a percentage of net sales.
Efficient Capital Structure – Our capital structure is designed to optimize our working capital in order
to finance expansion, both domestically and internationally. We believe that with our strong capital
position, our ability to raise funds, if necessary, at a relatively low effective cost of borrowings, provides
a competitive advantage. The reduction of days outstanding for accounts receivable and inventory days
on hand will remain an area of focus.

47
We believe that, subject to increases in the costs of certain raw materials being contained, these value
drivers, when implemented and/or achieved in the United States and internationally, will result in: (1) improving or
maintaining our product gross profit margins; (2) providing additional leverage over time through reduced expenses
as a percentage of net operating revenues; and (3) enhancing our cost of capital. The ultimate measure of success is
and will be reflected in our current and future results of operations.
Net sales, gross profit, operating income, net income and net income per share represent key measurements
of the above value drivers. These measurements will continue to be a key management focus in 2022 and beyond
(See “Part II, Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations –
Results of Operations”).
As of December 31, 2021, the Company had working capital of $3.72 billion compared to $2.39 billion as
of December 31, 2020. The increase in working capital was primarily the result of the $1.38 billion of net income
earned during the year ended December 31, 2021. For the year ended December 31, 2021, our net cash provided by
operating activities was approximately $1.16 billion as compared to $1.36 billion for the year ended December 31,
2020. Principal uses of cash flows in 2021, were purchases of investments, development of our Monster Energy®
brand internationally and acquisitions of real property, property and equipment. These principal uses of cash flows
are expected to be and remain our principal recurring use of cash and working capital funds in the future (See “Part
II, Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Liquidity
and Capital Resources”).
Opportunities, Challenges and Risks
Looking forward, our management has identified certain challenges and risks for the beverage industry and
the Company, including our significant commercial relationship with TCCC and TCCC’s status as a significant
stockholder of the Company, in each case as described above under “Part I, Item 1A – Risk Factors.”
In addition, legislation has been proposed and/or adopted at the U.S., state, county and/or municipal level
and proposed and/or adopted in certain foreign jurisdictions to restrict the sale of energy drinks (including
prohibiting the sale of energy drinks at certain establishments or pursuant to certain governmental programs), limit
caffeine content, require certain product labeling disclosures and/or warnings, impose taxes, limit product sizes or
impose age restrictions for the sale of energy drinks. In addition, articles critical of the caffeine content in energy
drinks and their perceived benefits and articles indicating certain health risks of energy drinks have been published.
The proposal and/or adoption of such legislation and the publication of such articles, or the future proposal and/or
adoption of similar legislation or publication of similar articles, may adversely affect our Company. In addition,
uncertainty and/or volatility in our domestic and/or our international economic markets could negatively affect both
the stability of our industry and our Company. Furthermore, our growth strategy includes expanding our
international business, which exposes us to risks inherent in conducting international operations, including the risks
associated with foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations. Consumer discretionary spending also represents a
challenge to the successful marketing and sale of our products. Increases in consumer and regulatory awareness of
the health problems arising from obesity and inactive lifestyles continue to represent a challenge. We recognize that
obesity is a complex and serious public health problem. Our commitment to consumers begins with our broad
product line and a wide selection of diet, light and low calorie beverages within our energy drink product lines. We
continuously strive to meet changing consumer needs through beverage innovation, choice and variety. (See
“Part I, Item 1A – Risk Factors”).
Our historical success is attributable, in part, to our introduction of different and innovative beverages which
have been positively accepted by consumers. Our future success will depend, in part, upon our continued ability to
develop and introduce different and innovative beverages that meet consumer preferences, although there can be
no assurance of our ability to do so. In order to retain and expand our market share, we must continue to develop
and introduce different and innovative beverages and be competitive in the areas of price, quality, method of
distribution, brand image and intellectual property protection. The beverage industry is subject to changing
consumer preferences that may adversely affect us if we misjudge such preferences.

48
In addition, other key challenges and risks that could impact our Company’s future financial results include,
but are not limited to:
the continuation or worsening of the COVID-19 pandemic;
the risks associated with the realization of benefits from our relationship with TCCC;
changes in consumer preferences and demand for our products;
economic uncertainty in the United States, Europe and other countries in which we operate;
the risks associated with foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations;
maintenance of our brand image, product quality and corporate reputation;
increasing concern over various environmental, human rights and health matters, including obesity,
caffeine consumption and energy drinks generally, and changes in regulation and consumer preferences
in response to those concerns;
profitable expansion and growth of our family of brands in the competitive market place (See
“Part I, Item 1 – Business – Competition” and “Part I, Item 1 – Business – Sales and Marketing”);
costs of establishing and promoting our brands internationally;
the risks associated with entering into new sectors in the beverage industry, in particular the alcohol
beverage sector, and making acquisitions to implement our growth strategy;
increases in costs of raw materials used by us;
restrictions on imports and sources of supply, duties or tariffs, changes in related government
regulations and disruptions in the timely import or export of our products and/or ingredients including
flavors, flavor ingredients and supplement ingredients, due to port strikes and/or port congestion, delays
due to the COVID-19 pandemic, related labor issues or other importation impediments;
protection of our existing intellectual property portfolio of trademarks and copyrights and the
continuous pursuit to develop and protect new and innovative trademarks and copyrights for our
expanding product lines;
limitations on available quantities of aluminum cans;
the increased costs resulting from importing aluminum cans and other raw materials and ingredients;
limitations on co-packing availability;
increases in ocean and domestic freight rates;
shortages of shipping containers and port congestion;
the long-term impact of Brexit on our business in Europe and the United Kingdom; and
the imposition of additional regulation, including regulation restricting the sale of energy drinks,
limiting caffeine content in beverages, requiring product labeling and/or warnings, imposing excise
taxes and/or sales taxes, and/or limiting product size and/or age restrictions.
See “Part I, Item 1A – Risk Factors” for additional information about risks and uncertainties facing our
Company.
We believe that the following opportunities exist for us:
domestic and international growth potential of our products;
growth potential of the energy drink category, both domestically and internationally;
growth potential of the affordable energy drink category;
planned and future new product and product line introductions with the objective of increasing sales
and/or contributing to higher profitability;
the introduction of new package formats designed to generate strong revenue growth;
package, pricing and channel opportunities to increase profitable growth;
effective strategic positioning to capitalize on industry growth;
broadening distribution/expansion opportunities in both domestic and international markets;
launching and/or relaunching our products and new products into new domestic and international
markets and channels;
continued focus on reducing our cost base; and
our entry into the alcohol category and development of our alcoholic portfolio.
49
Results of Operations
This section of the Annual Report on Form 10-K generally discusses 2021 and 2020 items and year-to-year
comparisons between 2021 and 2020. A detailed discussion of 2019 items and year-to-year comparisons between
2020 and 2019 that are not included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K can be found in “Management’s Discussion
and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Part II, Item 7 of the Company’s Annual Report
on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.
The following table sets forth key statistics for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019,
respectively.

(In thousands, except per share amounts) Percentage Percentage
Change Change

2021 2020 2019 21 vs. 20 20 vs. 19

Net sales1
Cost of sales
$ 5,541,352
2,432,839
$ 4,598,638
1,874,758
$ 4,200,819
1,682,234
20.5%
29.8%
9.5%
11.4%
Gross profit*1
Gross profit as a percentage of net sales
3,108,513
56.1%
2,723,880
59.2%
2,518,585
60.0%
14.1% 8.2%

 

Operating expenses
Operating expenses as a percentage of net sales
1,311,046
23.7%
1,090,727
23.7%
1,115,646
26.6%
20.2% (2.2)%

 

Operating income1
Operating income as a percentage of net sales
1,797,467
32.4%
1,633,153
35.5%
1,402,939
33.4%
10.1% 16.4%

Other income (expense), net 3,952 (6,996) 13,023 (156.5)% (153.7)%
Income before provision for income taxes
1 1,801,419 1,626,157 1,415,962 10.8% 14.8%
Provision for income taxes 423,944 216,563 308,127 95.8% (29.7)%
Income taxes as a percentage of income before taxes 23.5% 13.3% 21.8%

Net income1
Net income as a percentage of net sales
$ 1,377,475
24.9%
$ 1,409,594
30.7%
$ 1,107,835
26.4%
(2.3)% 27.2%

Net income per common share:

Basic
Diluted
$
$
2.61
2.57
$
$
2.66
2.64
$
$
2.04
2.03
(2.1)%
(2.4)%
30.3%
30.0%

Case sales (in thousands) (in 192‑ounce case equivalents) 613,441 504,821 448,770 21.5% 12.5%
¹Includes $41.5 million, $42.1 million and $46.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively, related to the
recognition of deferred revenue.
*Gross profit may not be comparable to that of other entities since some entities include all costs associated with their distribution process
in cost of sales, whereas others exclude certain costs and instead include such costs within another line item such as operating expenses. We
include out-bound freight and warehouse costs in operating expenses rather than in cost of sales.
Net Sales
Net sales were $5.54 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of approximately $942.7
million, or 20.5% higher than net sales of $4.60 billion for the year ended December 31, 2020. Net sales increased
primarily due to increased worldwide sales by volume of our Monster Energy® brand energy drinks as a result of
increased consumer demand. Net changes in foreign currency exchange rates had a favorable impact on net sales

50
of approximately $61.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. The comparative net sales for the year ended
December 31, 2020 were negatively impacted by $15.2 million related to the Product Returns.
Net sales for the Monster Energy® Drinks segment were $5.22 billion for the year ended December 31,
2021, an increase of approximately $915.4 million, or 21.3% higher than net sales of $4.31 billion for the year
ended December 31, 2020. Net sales for the Monster Energy® Drinks segment increased primarily due to increased
worldwide sales by volume of our Monster Energy® brand energy drinks as a result of increased consumer demand.
Net changes in foreign currency exchange rates had a favorable impact on net sales for the Monster Energy® Drinks
segment of approximately $57.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. The comparative net sales for the
Monster Energy® Drinks segment for the year ended December 31, 2020 were negatively impacted by $15.2 million
related to the Product Returns.
Net sales for the Strategic Brands segment were $294.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, an
increase of approximately $28.4 million, or 10.7% higher than net sales of $266.4 million for the year ended
December 31, 2020. Net sales for the Strategic Brands segment increased primarily due to increased worldwide
sales by volume of our Predator®, Burn® and Mother® brand energy drinks as a result of increased consumer
demand. Shortages of certain NOS® concentrates negatively impacted net sales for the year ended December 31,
2021. Net changes in foreign currency exchange rates had a favorable impact on net sales of approximately $4.3
million for the Strategic Brands segment for the year ended December 31, 2021.
Net sales for the Other segment were $25.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, a decrease of
approximately $1.1 million, or 4.1% lower than net sales of $27.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020.
Case sales, in 192-ounce case equivalents, were 613.4 million cases for the year ended December 31, 2021,
an increase of approximately 108.6 million cases or 21.5% higher than case sales of 504.8 million cases for the year
ended December 31, 2020. The overall average net sales per case (excluding net sales of AFF Third-Party Products
of $25.9 million and $27.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, as these sales do
not have unit case equivalents) decreased to $8.99 for the year ended December 31, 2021, which was 0.7% lower
than the average net sales per case of $9.06 for the year ended December 31, 2020. The decrease in the average net
sales per case was primarily the result of geographical sales mix.
Gross Profit
Gross profit was $3.11 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of approximately $384.6
million, or 14.1% higher than the gross profit of $2.72 billion for the year ended December 31, 2020. The increase
in gross profit dollars was primarily the result of the $942.7 million increase in net sales for the year ended
December 31, 2021.
Gross profit as a percentage of net sales decreased to 56.1% for the year ended December 31, 2021 from
59.2% for the year ended December 31, 2020. The decrease for the year ended December 31, 2021 was primarily
the result of increased aluminum can costs attributable to higher aluminum commodity pricing, increased costs of
certain other raw materials and ingredients, increased freight-in costs and geographical sales mix.
Operating Expenses
Total operating expenses were $1.31 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of
approximately $220.3 million, or 20.2% higher than total operating expenses of $1.09 billion for the year ended
December 31, 2020. As a percentage of net sales, operating expenses were 23.7% for both the years ended December
31, 2021 and 2020. The increase in operating expenses was primarily due to increased out-bound freight and
warehouse costs of $86.1 million, increased payroll expenses of $42.5 million, increased expenditures of $38.1
million for sponsorships and endorsements, increased expenditures of $15.7 million for social media and digital
marketing, and increased expenditures of $10.4 million for professional service expenses, including accounting and

51
legal costs. The increase in operating expenses for the year ended December 31, 2021, was partially offset by $16.9
million due to the reversal of amounts previously accrued in connection with an intellectual property claim. During
the comparative 2020 period, the Company decreased expenditures for sponsorship and endorsements and
decreased expenditures for travel and entertainment, each largely as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic.
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic was less pronounced on our sales and marketing programs during the year
ended December 31, 2021. Operating expenses for the year ended December 31, 2019 (pre COVID-19) were $1.12
billion, or 26.6% of net sales.
Operating Income
Operating income was $1.80 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of approximately
$164.3 million, or 10.1% higher than operating income of $1.63 billion for the year ended December 31, 2020.
Operating income as a percentage of net sales decreased to 32.4% for the year ended December 31, 2021 from
35.5% for the year ended December 31, 2020. Operating income was $402.8 million and $279.7 million for the
year ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, for our operations in EMEA, Asia Pacific, Latin America
and the Caribbean. Operating income for the year ended December 31,2019 (pre COVID-19) was $1.4 billion, or
33.4% of net sales.
Operating income for the Monster Energy® Drinks segment, exclusive of corporate and unallocated
expenses, was $1.99 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of approximately $170.4 million, or
9.4% higher than operating income of $1.82 billion for the year ended December 31, 2020. The increase in operating
income for the Monster Energy® Drinks segment was primarily the result of the $915.4 million increase in net sales
for the year ended December 31, 2021.
Operating income for the Strategic Brands segment, exclusive of corporate and unallocated expenses, was
$173.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of approximately $18.6 million, or 12.0% higher
than operating income of $155.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020. The increase in operating income
for the Strategic Brands segment was primarily the result of the $28.4 million increase in net sales.
Operating income for the Other segment, exclusive of corporate and unallocated expenses, was $6.9 million
for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of approximately $1.0 million, or 16.9% higher than operating
income of $5.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2020.
Other Income (Expense), net
Other income (expense), net, was $4.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, as compared to other
income (expense), net, of ($7.0) million for the year ended December 31, 2020. Foreign currency transaction gains
(losses) were $0.3 million and ($11.2) million for the year ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Interest
income was $4.2 million and $8.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.
Provision for Income Taxes
Provision for income taxes was $423.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of $207.4
million, or 95.8% higher than the provision for income taxes of $216.6 million for the year ended December 31,
2020. The effective combined federal, state and foreign tax rate was 23.5% and 13.3% for the year ended December
31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The comparative provision for income taxes for the year ended December 31, 2020
included the Non-Recurring Tax Benefit of approximately $165.1 million.
Net Income
Net income was $1.38 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021, a decrease of $32.1 million, or 2.3%
lower than net income of $1.41 billion for the year ended December 31, 2020. The decrease in net income for the

52
year ended December 31, 2021 was primarily due to the $207.4 million increase in the provision for income taxes
and the $220.3 million increase in operating expenses, partially offset by the $393.1 million increase in gross profit.
Key Business Metrics
We use certain key metrics and financial measures not prepared in accordance with United States Generally
Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”) to evaluate and manage our business. For a further discussion of how
we use key metrics and certain non-GAAP financial measures, see “Non-GAAP Financial Measures and Other Key
Metrics” below.
Non-GAAP Financial Measures and Other Key Metrics
Gross Billings**
Gross billings were $6.42 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of approximately $1.10
billion, or 20.6% higher than gross billings of $5.33 billion for the year ended December 31, 2020. Net changes in
foreign currency exchange rates had a favorable impact on gross billings of approximately $83.1 million for the
year ended December 31, 2021. The comparative gross billings for the year ended December 31, 2020 were
negatively impacted by $15.2 million related to the Product Returns.
Gross billings for the Monster Energy® Drinks segment were $6.06 billion for the year ended December
31, 2021, an increase of approximately $1.06 billion, or 21.3% higher than gross billings of $5.00 billion for the
year ended December 31, 2020. Gross billings for the Monster Energy® Drinks segment increased primarily due
to increased worldwide sales by volume of our Monster Energy® brand energy drinks as a result of increased
consumer demand. Net changes in foreign currency exchange rates had a favorable impact on gross billings for the
Monster Energy® Drinks segment of approximately $78.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. The
comparative gross billings for the Monster Energy® Drinks segment for the year ended December 31, 2020 were
negatively impacted by $15.2 million related to the Product Returns.
Gross billings for the Strategic Brands segment were $340.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2021,
an increase of $34.8 million, or 11.4% higher than gross billings of $305.4 million for the year ended December 31,
2020. Shortages of NOS® concentrate negatively impacted gross billings for the year ended December 31, 2021.
Net changes in foreign currency exchange rates had a favorable impact on gross billings in the Strategic Brands
segment of approximately $4.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2021.
Gross billings for the Other segment were $25.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, a decrease
of $1.1 million, or 4.1% lower than gross billings of $27.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020.
Promotional allowances, commissions and other expenses, as described in the footnote below, were $924.7
million for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of $152.6 million, or 19.8% higher than promotional
allowances, commissions and other expenses of $772.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2020. Promotional
allowances as a percentage of gross billings decreased to 12.8% from 13.1% for the year ended December 31, 2021
and 2020, respectively.
**Gross billings represent amounts invoiced to customers net of cash discounts and returns. Gross billings are used internally by
management as an indicator of and to monitor operating performance, including sales performance of particular products, salesperson
performance, product growth or declines and is useful to investors in evaluating overall Company performance. The use of gross billings
allows evaluation of sales performance before the effect of any promotional items, which can mask certain performance issues. We therefore
believe that the presentation of gross billings provides a useful measure of our operating performance. The use of gross billings is not a
measure that is recognized under GAAP and should not be considered as an alternative to net sales, which is determined in accordance with
GAAP, and should not be used alone as an indicator of operating performance in place of net sales. Additionally, gross billings may not be
comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies, as gross billings has been defined by our internal reporting practices. In
addition, gross billings may not be realized in the form of cash receipts as promotional payments and allowances may be deducted from
payments received from certain customers.

53
The following table reconciles the non-GAAP financial measure of gross billings with the most directly
comparable GAAP financial measure of net sales:
Percentage Percentage
In thousands Change Change
2021 2020 2019 21 vs. 20 20 vs. 19

Gross Billings
Deferred Revenue
Less: Promotional allowances,
commissions and other expenses***
Net Sales
$ 6,424,632
41,462
$ 5,328,683
42,110
$ 4,821,411
46,287
20.6%
(1.5%)
10.5%
(9.0%)
(924,742)
$ 5,541,352
(772,155)
$ 4,598,638
(666,879)
$ 4,200,819
19.8%
20.5%
15.8%
9.5%

***Although the expenditures described in this line item are determined in accordance with GAAP and meet GAAP requirements, the
presentation thereof does not conform to GAAP presentation requirements. Additionally, our definition of promotional and other allowances
may not be comparable to similar items presented by other companies. Promotional and other allowances primarily include consideration
given to our bottlers/distributors or retail customers including, but not limited to the following: (i) discounts granted off list prices to support
price promotions to end-consumers by retailers; (ii) reimbursements given to our bottlers/distributors for agreed portions of their
promotional spend with retailers, including slotting, shelf space allowances and other fees for both new and existing products; (iii) our
agreed share of fees given to bottlers/distributors and/or directly to retailers for advertising, in-store marketing and promotional activities;
(iv) our agreed share of slotting, shelf space allowances and other fees given directly to retailers, club stores and/or wholesalers;
(v) incentives given to our bottlers/distributors and/or retailers for achieving or exceeding certain predetermined sales goals; (vi) discounted
or free products; (vii) contractual fees given to our bottlers/distributors related to sales made by us direct to certain customers that fall within
the bottlers’/distributors’ sales territories; and (viii) certain commissions paid based on sales to our bottlers/distributors. The presentation
of promotional and other allowances facilitates an evaluation of their impact on the determination of net sales and the spending levels
incurred or correlated with such sales. Promotional and other allowances constitute a material portion of our marketing activities. Our
promotional allowance programs with our numerous bottlers/distributors and/or retailers are executed through separate agreements in the
ordinary course of business. These agreements generally provide for one or more of the arrangements described above and are of varying
durations, ranging from one week to one year. The primary drivers of our promotional and other allowance activities for the years ended
December 31, 2021 and 2020 were (i) to increase sales volume and trial, (ii) to address market conditions, and (iii) to secure shelf and
display space at retail.
Sales
The table set forth below discloses selected quarterly data regarding sales for the past three years. Data
from any one or more quarters is not necessarily indicative of annual results or continuing trends.
Sales of beverages are expressed in unit case volume. A “unit case” means a unit of measurement equal to
192 U.S. fluid ounces of finished beverage (24 eight-ounce servings). Unit case volume means the number of unit
cases (or unit case equivalents) of finished products or concentrates, as if converted into finished products, sold by
us.
Our quarterly results of operations reflect seasonal trends that are primarily the result of increased demand
in the warmer months of the year. It has been our experience that beverage sales tend to be lower during the first
and fourth quarters of each calendar year. In addition, our experience with our energy drink products suggests they
are less seasonal than the seasonality expected from traditional beverages. Quarterly fluctuations may also be
affected by other factors including the introduction of new products, the opening of new markets where temperature
fluctuations are more pronounced, the addition of new bottlers/distributors and customers, changes in the sales mix
of our products and changes in and/or increased advertising and promotional expenses. (See “Part I, Item 1 –
Business – Seasonality”).

54
2021 2020 2019
Net Sales (in Thousands)

Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
Less: AFF third party net sales (in Thousands)
Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
Adjusted Net Sales (in Thousands)¹
Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
Case Volume / Sales (in Thousands)
Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
Adjusted Average Net Sales Per Case
Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
$ 1,243,816 $ 1,062,097 $ 945,991
1,461,934
1,410,557
1,425,045
1,093,896
1,246,362
1,196,283
1,104,045
1,133,577
1,017,206
$ 5,541,352 $ 4,598,638 $ 4,200,819
$ (5,727) $ (5,105) $ (5,321)
(5,791)
(5,860)
(4,893)
(21,865)
(7,905)
(6,316)
(5,969)
(6,644)
(8,618)
(6,671)
$ (25,917) $ (27,038) $
$ 1,238,089 $ 1,056,992 $ 940,670
1,454,029
1,404,241
1,419,076
1,087,252
1,237,744
1,189,612
1,098,254
1,127,717
1,012,313
$ 5,515,435 $ 4,571,600 $ 4,178,954
138,566
161,450
159,975
153,450
613,441
115,598
116,960
139,922
132,341
504,821
101,284
119,595
121,854
106,037
448,770
$ 8.94
9.01
8.78
9.25
8.99
$ 9.14
9.30
8.85
8.99
9.06
$ 9.29
9.18
9.25
9.55
9.31
$ $ $

1Excludes Other segment net sales of $25.9 million, $27.0 million and $21.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and
2019, respectively, comprised of sales of our AFF Third-Party Products to independent third parties as these sales do not have unit case
equivalents.
The following represents case sales by segment for the years ended December 31:
(In thousands, except average net sales per case) 2021 2020 2019

Net sales
Less: AFF third-party sales
Adjusted net sales
1
Case sales by segment:
Monster Energy® Drinks
$ 5,541,352
(25,917)
5,515,435
$ 4,598,638
(27,038)
4,571,600
$ 4,200,819
(21,865)
4,178,954
$ $ $
520,577 428,596 377,551
Strategic Brands 92,864 76,225 71,219
Other
Total case sales
Average net sales per case

613,441
8.99

504,821
9.06

448,770
9.31
$ $ $

1Excludes Other segment net sales of $25.9 million, $27.0 million and $21.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and
2019, respectively, comprised of sales of our AFF Third-Party Products to independent third parties as these sales do not have unit case
equivalents.

55
Inflation
Inflation had a negative impact on our results of operations, leading to increased cost of sales and operating
expenses for the year ended December 31, 2021. Inflation did not have a significant impact on our results of
operations for the years ended December 31, 2020 or 2019.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Cash and cash equivalents, short-term and long-term investments – As of December 31, 2021, we had
$1.33 billion in cash and cash equivalents, $1.75 billion in short-term investments and $99.4 million in long-term
investments, including certificates of deposit, commercial paper, U.S. government agency securities, U.S.
treasuries, and to a lesser extent, municipal securities. We maintain our investments for cash management purposes
and not for purposes of speculation. Our risk management policies emphasize credit quality (primarily based on
short-term ratings by nationally recognized statistical rating organizations) in selecting and maintaining our
investments. We regularly assess market risk of our investments and believe our current policies and investment
practices adequately limit those risks. However, certain of these investments are subject to general credit, liquidity,
market and interest rate risks. These risks associated with our investment portfolio may have an adverse effect on
our future results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.
Of our $1.33 billion of cash and cash equivalents held at December 31, 2021, $608.6 million was held by
our foreign subsidiaries. No short-term or long-term investments were held by our foreign subsidiaries at December
31, 2021.
We believe that cash available from operations, including our cash resources and our revolving line of
credit, will be sufficient for our working capital needs, including purchase commitments for raw materials and
inventory, increases in accounts receivable, payments of tax liabilities, expansion and development needs, purchases
of shares of our common stock, as well as purchases of capital assets, equipment and properties, through at least the
next 12 months. Based on our current plans, capital expenditures (exclusive of common stock repurchases) are
currently estimated to be approximately $150.0 million through December 31, 2022. However, future business
opportunities may cause a change in this estimate.
Purchases of inventories, increases in accounts receivable and other assets, acquisition of property and
equipment (including real property, personal property and coolers), leasehold improvements, advances for or the
purchase of equipment for our bottlers, acquisition and maintenance of trademarks, payments of accounts payable,
income taxes payable and purchases of our common stock are expected to remain our principal recurring use of
cash.
The following summarizes our cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 (in
thousands):
Net cash provided by (used in):
2021 2020 2019

Operating activities
Investing activities
Financing activities
$ 1,155,741 $ 1,364,163 $ 1,113,762
$ (992,022) $ (472,487) $ (326,724)
$ 34,821 $ (526,068) $ (628,506)

Cash flows provided by operating activities. Cash provided by operating activities was $1.16 billion for the
year ended December 31, 2021, as compared with cash provided by operating activities of $1.36 billion for the year
ended December 31, 2020.
For the year ended December 31, 2021, cash provided by operating activities was primarily attributable to
net income earned of $1.38 billion and adjustments for certain non-cash expenses, consisting of $50.2 million of

56
depreciation and amortization, and $70.5 million of stock-based compensation. For the year ended December 31,
2021, cash provided by operating activities also increased due to a $114.3 million increase in accounts payable, a
$71.6 million increase in accrued liabilities, a $31.5 million increase in accrued promotional allowances, a $16.4
million increase in deferred income taxes, an $8.0 million increase in accrued compensation and a $7.2 million
increase in income taxes payable. For the year ended December 31, 2021, cash used in operating activities was
primarily attributable a $277.8 million increase in inventories, a $254.2 million increase in accounts receivable, a
$29.3 million increase in prepaid expenses and other assets, a $22.7 million decrease in deferred revenue and a
$10.9 million increase in prepaid income taxes.
For the year ended December 31, 2020, cash provided by operating activities was primarily attributable to
net income earned of $1.41 billion and adjustments for certain non-cash expenses, consisting of $57.0 million of
depreciation and amortization, $70.3 million of stock-based compensation and $8.7 million of intangible
impairments. For the year ended December 31, 2020, cash provided by operating activities also increased due to a
$30.3 million decrease in inventories, a $26.4 million increase in accrued liabilities, an $18.7 million increase in
accounts payable, a $13.8 million increase in accrued promotional allowances, a $10.4 million increase in income
taxes payable, a $7.5 million increase in accrued compensation, a $5.5 million decrease in prepaid income taxes
and a $1.0 million decrease in prepaid expenses and other assets. For the year ended December 31, 2020, cash used
in operating activities was primarily attributable to a $156.9 million increase in deferred income taxes, a $120.1
million increase in accounts receivable and a $21.5 million decrease in deferred revenue.
Cash flows used in investing activities. Net cash used in investing activities was $992.0 million for the year
ended December 31, 2021 as compared to cash used in investing activities of $472.5 million for the year ended
December 31, 2020.
For both the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, cash provided by investing activities was primarily
attributable to sales of available-for-sale investments. For both the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, cash
used in investing activities was primarily attributable to purchases of available-for-sale investments. For both the
years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, cash used in investing activities also included the acquisition of fixed
assets consisting of vans and promotional vehicles, coolers and other equipment to support our marketing and
promotional activities, production equipment, furniture and fixtures, office and computer equipment, real property,
computer software, equipment used for sales and administrative activities, certain leasehold improvements,
improvements to real property as well as the acquisition, defense and maintenance of trademarks. We expect to
continue to use a portion of our cash in excess of our requirements for operations for purchasing short-term and
long-term investments, leasehold improvements, the acquisition of capital equipment (specifically, vans, trucks and
promotional vehicles, coolers, other promotional equipment, merchandise displays, warehousing racks as well as
items of production equipment required to produce certain of our existing and/or new products and to develop our
brand in international markets) and for other corporate purposes. From time to time, we may also use cash to
purchase additional real property related to our beverage business and/or acquire compatible businesses.
Cash flows provided by (used in) financing activities. Cash provided by financing activities was $34.8
million for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to cash used in financing activities of ($526.1) million
for the year ended December 31, 2020. The cash flows provided by financing activities for both the years ended
December 31, 2021, and 2020 was primarily attributable to the issuance of our common stock related to stock-based
compensation. The cash flows used in financing activities for both the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020
was primarily the result of the repurchases of our common stock related to stock-based compensation.

57
The following represents a summary of the Company’s contractual commitments and related scheduled
maturities as of December 31, 2021:
Payments due by period (in thousands)
Less than 1‑3 3‑5 More than
Obligations Total 1 year years years 5 years

Contractual Obligations1 $ 305,053 $ 236,698 $ 68,345 $ 10 $
Finance Leases 1,006 964 34 8
Operating Leases 24,714 4,605 6,799 3,361 9,949
Purchase Commitments2 273,422
$ 604,195
273,422
$ 515,689

75,178

3,379

9,949
$ $ $

¹ Contractual obligations include our obligations related to sponsorships, other marketing activities and AFF new production facility
construction costs.
² Purchase commitments include obligations made by us and our subsidiaries to various suppliers for raw materials used in the production of
our products. These obligations vary in terms, but are generally satisfied within one year.
In addition, no unrecognized tax benefits have been recorded as liabilities as of December 31, 2021. It is
expected that the amount of unrecognized tax benefits will not significantly change within the next 12 months.
Accounting Policies and Pronouncements
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with GAAP. GAAP requires us to make
estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts in our consolidated financial statements. Critical
accounting estimates are those that management believes are the most important to the portrayal of our financial
condition and results and require the most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need
to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain and that have had, or are reasonably likely
to have, a material impact on our financial condition or results of operations. Judgments and uncertainties may
result in materially different amounts being reported under different conditions or using different assumptions. See
“Part II, Item 8 – Financial Statements and Supplementary Data – Note 1 – Organization and Summary of
Significant Accounting Policies” for a summary of our significant accounting policies.
The following summarizes our most significant critical accounting estimates:
Goodwill – The Company records goodwill when the consideration paid for an acquisition exceeds the fair
value of net tangible and intangible assets acquired, including related tax effects. Goodwill is not amortized; instead,
goodwill is tested for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if the Company believes indicators of
impairment exist. The Company first assesses qualitative factors to determine whether it is more-likely-than-not
that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value. If the Company reasonably determines that it is
more-likely-than-not that the fair value is less than the carrying value, the Company performs its annual, or interim,
goodwill impairment test by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount. Application of
the goodwill impairment test requires significant judgment, including the identification of reporting units,
assignment of assets and liabilities to reporting units, assignment of goodwill to reporting units, and determination
of the fair value of each reporting unit. The fair value of each reporting unit is estimated through the use of a
discounted cash flow methodology. This analysis requires significant assumptions, including discount rate,
projected future revenues, projected future operating margins and terminal growth rates. The estimates used to
calculate the fair value of a reporting unit change from year to year based on operating results, market conditions
and other factors. Changes in these estimates and assumptions could materially affect the determination of fair value
and goodwill impairment for each reporting unit. The Company will recognize an impairment for the amount by
which the carrying amount exceeds a reporting unit’s fair value. For the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and
2019, there were no impairments recorded and there are no accumulated impairment balances.

58
Other Intangibles – In accordance with FASB ASC 350, intangible assets with indefinite lives are not
amortized but instead are measured for impairment at least annually, or when events indicate that an impairment
exists. Recoverability of indefinite-lived intangible assets is determined on a relief from royalty methodology,
which is based on the implied royalty paid, at an appropriate discount rate, to license the use of an asset rather than
owning the asset. The present value of the after-tax cost savings (i.e. royalty relief) indicates the estimated fair value
of the asset. Any excess of the carrying value over the estimated fair value is recognized as an impairment loss
equal to that excess. This analysis requires significant assumptions, including discount rate, projected future
revenues and terminal growth rates. A significant change in any or a combination of the assumptions used to
estimate fair value of our indefinite-lived intangible assets could have a negative impact on the estimated fair values.
The Company amortizes its trademarks with finite useful lives over their respective useful lives. For the years ended
December 31, 2021 and 2019 no impairments were recorded. For the year ended December 31, 2020, an impairment
charge of $8.7 million was recorded to intangibles.
Revenue Recognition – Promotional and other allowances (variable consideration) recorded as a reduction
to net sales, primarily include consideration given to the Company’s bottlers/distributors or retail customers
including, but not limited to the following:
discounts granted off list prices to support price promotions to end-consumers by retailers;
reimbursements given to the Company’s bottlers/distributors for agreed portions of their
promotional spend with retailers, including slotting, shelf space allowances and other fees for both
new and existing products;
the Company’s agreed share of fees given to bottlers/distributors and/or directly to retailers for
advertising, in-store marketing and promotional activities;
the Company’s agreed share of slotting, shelf space allowances and other fees given directly to
retailers;
incentives given to the Company’s bottlers/distributors and/or retailers for achieving or exceeding
certain predetermined sales goals;
discounted or free products;
contractual fees given to the Company’s bottlers/distributors related to sales made directly by the
Company to certain customers that fall within the bottlers’/distributors’ sales territories; and
commissions paid to TCCC based on our sales to certain wholly-owned subsidiaries of TCCC
and/or to certain companies accounted for under the equity method by TCCC.
The Company’s promotional allowance programs with its bottlers/distributors and/or retailers are executed
through separate agreements in the ordinary course of business. These agreements generally provide for one or
more of the arrangements described above and are of varying durations, ranging from one week to one year. The
Company’s promotional and other allowances are calculated based on various programs with bottlers/distributors
and retail customers, and accruals are established during the year for its anticipated liabilities. These accruals are
based on agreed upon terms as well as the Company’s historical experience with similar programs and require
management’s judgment with respect to estimating consumer participation and/or distributor and retail customer
performance levels. Differences between such estimated expenses and actual expenses for promotional and other
allowance costs have historically been insignificant and are recognized in earnings in the period such differences
are determined.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
See “Part II, Item 8 – Financial Statements and Supplementary Data – Note 1 – Organization and Summary
of Significant Accounting Policies – Recent Accounting Pronouncements” for a full description of recent
accounting pronouncements including the respective expected dates of adoption and expected effects on the
Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or liquidity.

59
Forward-Looking Statements
Certain statements made in this report may constitute forward-looking statements (within the meaning of
Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934,
as amended) (the “Exchange Act”) regarding the expectations of management with respect to revenues, profitability,
adequacy of funds from operations and our existing credit facility, among other things. All statements containing a
projection of revenues, income (loss), earnings (loss) per share, capital expenditures, dividends, capital structure or
other financial items, a statement of management’s plans and objectives for future operations, or a statement of
future economic performance contained in management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results
of operations, including statements related to new products, volume growth and statements encompassing general
optimism about future operating results and non-historical information, are forward-looking statements within the
meaning of the Exchange Act. Without limiting the foregoing, the words “believes,” “thinks,” “anticipates,”
“plans,” “expects,” “estimates” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements.
Management cautions that these statements are qualified by their terms and/or important factors, many of
which are outside our control and involve a number of risks, uncertainties and other factors, that could cause actual
results and events to differ materially from the statements made including, but not limited to, the following:
Our ability to absorb, mitigate or pass on to our bottlers/distributors and/or consumers increases in commodity,
freight and other costs;
The human and economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, including new variants, as well as the
measures taken or that may be taken in the future by governments, and consequently, businesses (including the
Company and its suppliers, bottlers/ distributors, co-packers and other service providers) and the public at large
to limit the COVID-19 pandemic;
Fluctuations in growth and/or growth rates and/or decline in sales of the domestic and international energy drink
categories generally, including in the convenience and gas channel (which is our largest channel) and the impact
on demand for our products resulting from deteriorating economic conditions and/or financial uncertainties due
to the COVID-19 pandemic;
The impact of temporary plant closures, production slowdowns and disruptions in operations experienced by
our suppliers, bottlers/distributors and/or co-packers as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, including any
material disruptions on the production and distribution of our products;
The impact of the reduction in 2020 or future reductions of our sponsorship and endorsement activities as well
as our sampling activities as a result of COVID-19 or other pandemics on our future sales and market share;
The impact of countries being in lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic at various times;
Delays in the availability and/or administration and/or acceptance of vaccines may prolong the COVID-19
pandemic;
The impact of vaccine mandates on our business and supply chain, including our ability to recruit and/or retain
employees, and disruptions in the business of our co-packers, bottlers/distributors and/or suppliers.
Closures of, and continued restrictions on, on-premise retailers and other establishments which sell our products
as the result of the COVID-19 pandemic;
The limitation or reduction by our suppliers, bottlers/distributors and/or co-packers of their activities and/or
operations during the COVID-19 pandemic;
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our product sampling programs;
Our ability to introduce new products and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our innovation activities;
Our ability to successfully adapt to the changing landscape of advertising, marketing, promotional, sponsorship
and endorsement opportunities created by the COVID-19 pandemic;
Other effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on our employees, such as mental health challenges that employees
may face;
The impact of any reductions in productivity and disruptions to our business routines while most office-based
employees of the Company are working remotely;
The impact of logistical issues, including shortages of shipping containers, port of entry congestion and
increased freight costs;

60
We have extensive commercial arrangements with TCCC and, as a result, our future performance is
substantially dependent on the success of our relationship with TCCC;
The impact of TCCC’s bottlers/distributors distributing Coca-Cola brand energy drinks and possible reductions
in the number of our SKUs carried by such bottlers/distributors and/or such bottlers/distributors imposing
limitations on distributing new product SKUs;
The effect of TCCC being one of our significant stockholders and the potential divergence of TCCC’s interests
from those of our other stockholders;
Our ability to maintain relationships with TCCC system bottlers/distributors and manage their ongoing
commitment to focus on our products;
Disruption in distribution channels and/or decline in sales due to the termination and/or insolvency of existing
and/or new domestic and/or international bottlers/distributors;
Lack of anticipated demand for our products in domestic and/or international markets;
Fluctuations in the inventory levels of our bottlers/distributors, planned or otherwise, and the resultant impact
on our revenues;
Unfavorable regulations, including taxation requirements, age restrictions imposed on the sale, purchase, or
consumption of our products, marketing restrictions, product registration requirements, tariffs, trade
restrictions, container size limitations and/or ingredient restrictions;
The effect of inquiries from, and/or actions by, state attorneys general, the Federal Trade Commission (the
“FTC”), the Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”), municipalities, city attorneys, other government
agencies, quasi-government agencies, government officials (including members of U.S. Congress) and/or
analogous central and local agencies and other authorities in the foreign countries in which our products are
manufactured and/or distributed, into the advertising, marketing, promotion, ingredients, sale and/or
consumption of our energy drink products, including voluntary and/or required changes to our business
practices;
Our ability to comply with laws, regulations and evolving industry standards regarding consumer privacy and
data use and security, including with respect to the General Data Protection Regulation and the California
Consumer Privacy Act of 2018;
Our ability to achieve profitability and/or repatriate cash from certain of our operations outside the United
States;
Our ability to manage legal and regulatory requirements in foreign jurisdictions, potential difficulties in staffing
and managing foreign operations and potentially higher incidence of fraud or corruption and credit risk of
foreign customers and/or bottlers/distributors;
Changes in U.S. tax laws as a result of any legislation proposed by the new U.S. Presidential Administration or
U.S. Congress, which may include efforts to change or repeal the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and the federal
corporate income tax rate reduction;
Our ability to produce our products in international markets in which they are sold, thereby reducing freight
costs and/or product damages;
Our ability to effectively manage our inventories and/or our accounts receivables;
Our foreign currency exchange rate risk with respect to our sales, expenses, profits, assets and liabilities
denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, which will continue to increase as foreign sales increase;
The long-term impact of the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union (or “Brexit”);
Changes in accounting standards may affect our reported profitability;
Implications of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s base erosion and profit shifting
project;
Any proceedings which may be brought against us by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”),
the FDA, the FTC or other governmental agencies or bodies;
The outcome and/or possibility of future shareholder derivative actions or shareholder securities litigation that
may be filed against us and/or against certain of our officers and directors, and the possibility of other private
shareholder litigation;

61
The outcome of product liability or consumer fraud litigation and/or class action litigation (or its analog in
foreign jurisdictions) regarding the safety of our products and/or the ingredients in and/or claims made in
connection with our products and/or alleging false advertising, marketing and/or promotion, and the possibility
of future product liability and/or class action lawsuits;
Exposure to significant liabilities due to litigation, legal or regulatory proceedings;
Intellectual property injunctions;
Unfavorable resolution of tax matters;
Uncertainty and volatility in the domestic and global economies, including risk of counterparty default or
failure;
Our ability to address any significant deficiencies or material weakness in our internal controls over financial
reporting;
Our ability to continue to generate sufficient cash flows to support our expansion plans and general operating
activities;
Decreased demand for our products resulting from changes in consumer preferences, including changes in
demand for different packages, sizes and configurations, obesity and other perceived health concerns, including
concerns relating to certain ingredients in our products or packaging, product safety concerns and/or from
decreased consumer discretionary spending power;
Adverse publicity surrounding obesity and health concerns related to our products, product safety and quality,
water usage, environmental impact and sustainability, human rights, our culture, workforce and labor and
workplace laws;
Changes in demand that are weather related and/or for other reasons, including changes in product category
and/or package consumption and changes in cost and availability of certain key ingredients including aluminum
cans, as well as disruptions to the supply chain, as a result of climate change and extreme weather conditions;
The impact of unstable political conditions, civil unrest, large scale terrorist acts, the outbreak or escalation of
armed hostilities, major natural disasters and extreme weather conditions, or widespread outbreaks of infectious
diseases (such as the COVID-19 pandemic);
The impact on our business of competitive products and pricing pressures and our ability to gain or maintain
our share of sales in the marketplace as a result of actions by competitors, including unsubstantiated and/or
misleading claims, false advertising claims and tortious interference, as well as competitors selling misbranded
products;
The impact on our business of trademark and trade dress infringement proceedings brought against us relating
to our brands, including our Reign Total Body Fuel® high performance energy drinks, which could result in an
injunction barring us from selling certain of our products and/or require changes to be made to our current trade
dress;
Our ability to implement and/or maintain price increases, including through reductions in promotional
allowances;
An inability to achieve volume growth through product and packaging initiatives;
Our ability to sustain the current level of sales and/or achieve growth for our Monster Energy® brand energy
drinks and/or our other products, including our Strategic Brands;
Our ability to implement our growth strategy, including expanding our business in existing and new sectors,
such as the alcoholic beverage sector;
Our ability to successfully integrate CANarchy and other acquired businesses or assets;
The impact of criticism of our energy drink products and/or the energy drink market generally and/or legislation
enacted (whether as a result of such criticism or otherwise) that restricts the marketing or sale of energy drinks
(including prohibiting the sale of energy drinks at certain establishments or pursuant to certain governmental
programs), limits caffeine content in beverages, requires certain product labeling disclosures and/or warnings,
imposes excise and/or sales taxes, limits product sizes and/or imposes age restrictions for the sale of energy
drinks;
Our ability to comply with and/or resulting lower consumer demand and/or lower profit margins for energy
drinks due to proposed and/or future U.S. federal, state and local laws and regulations and/or proposed or
existing laws and regulations in certain foreign jurisdictions and/or any changes therein, including changes in

62
taxation requirements (including tax rate changes, new tax laws, new and/or increased excise, sales and/or other
taxes on our products and revised tax law interpretations) and environmental laws, as well as the Federal Food,
Drug, and Cosmetic Act and regulations or rules made thereunder or in connection therewith by the FDA, as
well as changes in any other food, drug or similar laws in the United States and internationally, especially those
changes that may restrict the sale of energy drinks (including prohibiting the sale of energy drinks at certain
establishments or pursuant to certain governmental programs), limit caffeine content in beverages, require
certain product labeling disclosures and/or warnings, impose excise taxes, impose sugar taxes, limit product
sizes, or impose age restrictions for the sale of energy drinks, as well as laws and regulations or rules made or
enforced by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and/or the FTC or their foreign
counterparts;
Disruptions in the timely import or export of our products and/or ingredients including flavors, flavor
ingredients and supplement ingredients due to port congestion, strikes and related labor issues or otherwise;
Our ability to satisfy all criteria set forth in any model energy drink guidelines, including, without limitation,
those adopted by the American Beverage Association, of which we are a member, and/or any international
beverage associations and the impact of our failure to satisfy such guidelines may have on our business;
The effect of unfavorable or adverse public relations, press, articles, comments and/or media attention;
Changes in the cost, quality and availability of containers, packaging materials, aluminum cans, the Midwest
and other premiums, raw materials, including flavors and flavor ingredients, and other ingredients and juice
concentrates, and our ability to obtain and/or maintain favorable supply arrangements and relationships and
procure timely and/or sufficient production of all or any of our products to meet customer demand;
Any shortages that may be experienced in the procurement of containers and/or other raw materials including,
without limitation, flavors, flavor ingredients, supplement ingredients, aluminum cans generally, PET
containers used for our Monster Hydro® energy drinks, 24-ounce aluminum cap cans and 550ml BRE
aluminum cans with resealable ends;
Limitations in securing the supply of sufficient quantities of aluminum cans may cause us to focus on producing
higher volume products. As a result, certain of our lower volume products may be temporarily discontinued by
our bottlers/distributors and/or their retail customers, and we may not be able to reinstate all, or any, of such
lower volume products in the future;
In order to secure sufficient quantities of aluminum cans and sufficient co-packing availability in the future, we
may be required to commit to minimum purchase volumes and/or minimum co-packing volumes. In the event
that we over-estimate future demand for our products and therefore may not purchase such minimum quantities
in full, or utilize such minimum co-packing volumes in full, we may incur claims and/or costs or losses in
respect of such shortfalls;
The impact on our cost of sales of corporate activity among the limited number of suppliers from whom we
purchase certain raw materials;
Our ability to pass on to our customers all or a portion of any increases in the costs of raw materials, ingredients,
commodities and/or other cost inputs affecting our business;
Our ability to achieve both internal domestic and international forecasts, which may be based on projected
volumes and sales of many product types and/or new products, certain of which are more profitable than others;
there can be no assurance that we will achieve projected levels of sales as well as forecasted product and/or
geographic mixes;
Our ability to penetrate new domestic and/or international markets and/or gain approval or mitigate the delay
in securing approval for the sale of our products in various countries;
The effectiveness of sales and/or marketing efforts by us and/or by the bottlers/distributors of our products,
most of whom distribute products that may be regarded as competitive with our products;
Unilateral decisions by bottlers/distributors, buying groups, convenience chains, grocery chains, mass
merchandisers, specialty chain stores, e-commerce retailers, e-commerce websites, club stores and other
customers to discontinue carrying all or any of our products that they are carrying at any time, restrict the range
of our products they carry, impose restrictions or limitations on the sale of our products and/or devote less
resources to the sale of our products;

63
The impact of possible trading disputes between our bottler/distributors and their customers and/or one or more
buying groups which may result in the delisting of certain of the Company products, temporarily or otherwise;
The effects of retailer consolidation on our business and our ability to successfully adapt to the rapidly changing
retail landscape;
Our ability to adapt to the changing retail landscape with the rapid growth in e-commerce retailers;
The effects of bottler/distributor consolidation on our business;
The costs and/or effectiveness, now or in the future, of our advertising, marketing and promotional strategies;
The success of our sports marketing, social media and other general marketing endeavors both domestically
and internationally;
Unforeseen economic and political changes and local or international catastrophic events;
Possible product recalls and/or reformulations of certain of our products and/or market withdrawals of certain
of our products due to defective and/or non-compliant formulas or production in one or more jurisdictions;
Our ability to make suitable arrangements and/or procure sufficient capacity for the co-packing of any of our
products both domestically and internationally, the timely replacement of discontinued co-packing
arrangements and/or limitations on co-packing availability, including for retort production;
Our ability to make suitable arrangements for the timely procurement of non-defective raw materials;
Our inability to protect and/or the loss of our intellectual property rights and/or our inability to use our
trademarks, trade names or designs and/or trade dress in certain countries;
Volatility of stock prices which may restrict stock sales, stock purchases or other opportunities as well as
negatively impact the motivation of equity award grantees;
Provisions in our organizational documents and/or control by insiders which may prevent changes in control
even if such changes would be beneficial to other stockholders;
The failure of our bottlers and/or co-packers to manufacture our products on a timely basis or at all;
Any disruption in and/or lack of effectiveness of our information technology systems, including a breach of
cyber security, that disrupts our business or negatively impacts customer relationships, as well as cybersecurity
incidents involving data shared with third parties; and
Recruitment and retention of senior management, other key employees and our employee base in general.
The foregoing list of important factors and other risks detailed from time to time in our reports filed with
the Securities and Exchange Commission is not exhaustive. See “Part I, Item 1A – Risk Factors,” for a more
complete discussion of these risks and uncertainties and for other risks and uncertainties. Those factors and the
other risk factors described therein are not necessarily all of the important factors that could cause actual results or
developments to differ materially from those expressed in any of our forward-looking statements. Other unknown
or unpredictable factors also could harm our results. Consequently, our actual results could be materially different
from the results described or anticipated by our forward-looking statements due to the inherent uncertainty of
estimates, forecasts and projections, and may be better or worse than anticipated. Given these uncertainties, you
should not rely on forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements represent our estimates and
assumptions only as of the date that they were made. We expressly disclaim any duty to provide updates to forwardlooking statements, and the estimates and assumptions associated with them, after the date of this report, in order
to reflect changes in circumstances or expectations or the occurrence of unanticipated events except to the extent
required by applicable securities laws.
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
In the normal course of business our financial position is routinely subject to a variety of risks. The principal
market risks (i.e., the risk of loss arising from adverse changes in market rates and prices) to which we are exposed
are fluctuations in commodity and other input prices affecting the costs of our raw materials (including, but not
limited to, increases in the costs of juice concentrates, increases in the price of aluminum cans, as well as sugar,
sucralose and other sweeteners, glucose, sucrose, milk, cream, protein, coffee and tea, all of which are used in some
or many of our products), fluctuations in energy and fuel prices, and limited availability of aluminum cans and
certain other raw materials. We generally do not use hedging agreements or alternative instruments to manage the
risks associated with securing sufficient ingredients or raw materials. We are also subject to market risks with

64
respect to the cost of commodities and other inputs because our ability to recover increased costs through higher
pricing is limited by the competitive environment in which we operate.
We do not use derivative financial instruments to protect ourselves from fluctuations in interest rates and
generally do not hedge against fluctuations in commodity prices.
Our net sales to customers outside of the United States were approximately 37% and 33% of consolidated
net sales for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Our growth strategy includes expanding
our international business. As a result, we are subject to risks from changes in foreign currency exchange rates.
During the year ended December 31, 2021, we entered into forward currency exchange contracts with financial
institutions to create an economic hedge to specifically manage a portion of the foreign exchange risk exposure
associated with certain consolidated subsidiaries’ non-functional currency denominated assets and liabilities. All
foreign currency exchange contracts entered into by us as of December 31, 2021 have terms of three months or less.
We do not enter into forward currency exchange contracts for speculation or trading purposes.
We have not designated our foreign currency exchange contracts as hedge transactions under FASB ASC
815. Therefore, gains and losses on our foreign currency exchange contracts are recognized in other income, net, in
the consolidated statements of income, and are largely offset by the changes in the fair value of the underlying
economically hedged item. We do not consider the potential loss resulting from a hypothetical 10% adverse change
in quoted foreign currency exchange rates as of December 31, 2021 to be significant.
As of December 31, 2021, we had $1.33 billion in cash and cash equivalents, $1.75 billion in short-term
investments and $99.4 million in long-term investments including certificates of deposit, commercial paper, U.S.
government agency securities, U.S. treasuries, and to a lesser extent, municipal securities. Certain of these
investments are subject to general credit, liquidity, market and interest rate risks.
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
The information required to be furnished in response to this Item 8 follows the signature page and Index to
Exhibits hereto at pages 72 through 114.
ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING
AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
None.
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures – Under the supervision and with the participation of
the Company’s management, including our Co-Chief Executive Officers and Chief Financial Officer, we have
evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in
Rules 13(a)-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) of the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based
upon this evaluation, the Co-Chief Executive Officers and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our
disclosure controls and procedures are effective to ensure that information we are required to disclose in reports
that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (1) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time
periods specified in rules and forms of the SEC and (2) accumulated and communicated to our management,
including our principal executive and principal financial officers as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding
required disclosures.
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting – Our management is responsible for
establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Exchange Act Rules
13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f). Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our CoChief Executive Officers and Chief Financial Officer, our management conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness
of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2020, based on the framework in
Internal Control
65
– Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway
Commission. Based on our management’s evaluation under the framework in
Internal Control – Integrated
Framework (2013)
, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as
of December 31, 2021.
Our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2021 has been audited by Deloitte &
Touche LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their attestation report, which is included
herein.
Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting – There were no changes in the Company’s internal
controls over financial reporting during the quarter ended December 31, 2021, that have materially affected, or are
reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

66
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of
Monster Beverage Corporation
Corona, California
Opinion on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
We have audited the internal control over financial reporting of Monster Beverage Corporation and subsidiaries
(the ”Company”) as of December 31, 2021, based on criteria established in
Internal Control —Integrated
Framework (2013)
issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”).
In our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting
as of December 31, 2021, based on criteria established in
Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013) issued
by COSO.
We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States) (“PCAOB”), the consolidated financial statements and financial statement schedule as of and for the year
ended December 31, 2021, of the Company and our report dated February 28, 2022, expressed an unqualified
opinion on those financial statements.
Basis for Opinion
The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and
for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on
the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm
registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the
U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission
and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting
was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over
financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating
effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered
necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Definition and Limitations of Internal Control over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance
regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in
accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting
includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail,
accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable
assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance
with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made
only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable
assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s
assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.
Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that the controls may
become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or
procedures may deteriorate.
/s/ DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP
Costa Mesa, California
February 28, 2022

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ITEM 9B.
None.
OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 9C.
INSPECTIONS
DISCLOSURE REGARDING FOREIGN JURISDICITONS THAT PREVENT

Not applicable.
PART III
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
The information required by this item regarding our directors is included under the caption “Proposal One –
Election of Directors” in our Proxy Statement for our 2022 Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be filed with the
SEC within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 (the “2022 Proxy Statement”) and
is incorporated herein by reference.
Information concerning compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act is included under the caption
“Delinquent Section 16(a) Reports” in our 2022 Proxy Statement and is incorporated herein by reference.
Information concerning the Audit Committee and the Audit Committee Financial Expert is reported under
the caption “Audit Committee; Report of the Audit Committee; Duties and Responsibilities” in our 2022 Proxy
Statement and is incorporated herein by reference.
Code of Business Conduct and Ethics
We have adopted a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that applies to all our directors, officers (including
our principal executive officers, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer and controllers) and
employees. The Code of Business Conduct and Ethics and any amendment thereto, as well as any waivers that are
required to be disclosed by the rules of the SEC or NASDAQ, may be obtained at http://investors.
monsterbevcorp.com/corporate-governance or at no cost to you by writing or telephoning us at the following
address or telephone number:
Monster Beverage Corporation
1 Monster Way
Corona, CA 92879
(951) 739-6200
(800) 426-7367
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
Information concerning the compensation of our directors and executive officers and Compensation
Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation is reported under the captions “Compensation Discussion and
Analysis,” and “Compensation Committee,” respectively, in our 2022 Proxy Statement and is incorporated herein
by reference.
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT
AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS
The disclosure set forth in Item 5, “Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder
Matters and Issuer Repurchases of Equity Securities”, of this report is incorporated herein.
Information concerning the beneficial ownership of the Company’s Common Stock of (a) those persons
known to the Company to be the beneficial owners of more than 5% of the Company’s common stock; (b) each of

68
the Company’s directors and nominees for director; and (c) the Company’s executive officers and all of the
Company’s current directors and executive officers as a group is reported under the caption “Principal Stockholders
and Security Ownership of Management” in our 2022 Proxy Statement and is incorporated herein by reference.
Information concerning shares of the Company’s Common Stock authorized for issuance under the
Company’s equity compensation plans is reported under the caption “Employee Equity Compensation Plan
Information” in our 2022 Proxy Statement and is incorporated herein by reference.
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR
INDEPENDENCE
Information concerning certain relationships and related transactions is reported under the caption “Certain
Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence” in our 2022 Proxy Statement and is
incorporated herein by reference.
ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES
Information concerning our accountant fees and our Audit Committee’s pre-approval of audit and
permissible non-audit services of independent auditors is reported under the captions “Principal Accounting Firm
Fees” and “Pre-Approval of Audit and Non-Audit Services,” respectively, in our 2022 Proxy Statement and is
incorporated herein by reference.
PART IV
ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES
(a) The following documents are filed as a part of this Form 10-K:

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (PCAOB ID No. 34) 73
Financial Statements:
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2021 and 2020 76
Consolidated Statements of Income for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 77
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the years ended December 31, 2021,
2020 and 2019 78
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2021,
2020 and 2019 79
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and
2019 80
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 82
Financial Statement Schedule:
Valuation and Qualifying Accounts for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019. 114
Exhibits:
The Exhibits listed in the Index of Exhibits, which appears immediately preceding the
signature page and is incorporated herein by reference, as filed as part of this Form 10-K.

ITEM 16. FORM 10-K SUMMARY
None
69
INDEX TO EXHIBITS
The following designated exhibits, as indicated below, are either filed or furnished, as applicable herewith
or have heretofore been filed or furnished with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Securities Act
of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

2.1 Transaction Agreement, dated as of August 14, 2014, by and among Monster Beverage Corporation,
New Laser Corporation, New Laser Merger Corp, The Coca-Cola Company and European Refreshments
(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to our Form 8-K dated August 18, 2014).
2.1.1 Amendment to Transaction Agreement, dated as of March 16, 2018, by and among Monster Beverage
Corporation, New Laser Corporation, New Laser Merger Corp., The Coca-Cola Company and European
Refreshments (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to our Form 8-K dated March 20, 2018).
2.2 Asset Transfer Agreement, dated as of August 14, 2014, by and among Monster Beverage Corporation,
New Laser Corporation and The Coca-Cola Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.2 to our
Form 8-K dated August 18, 2014).
3.1 Certificate of Incorporation of the Company, as amended (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to our
Form 10-K dated November 7, 2016).
3.2 Second Amended and Restated By-laws of the Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to our
Form 8-K dated April 16, 2018).
4.1 Description of Common Stock (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to our Form 10-K dated
February 28, 2020).
10.1 Amended and Restated Distribution Coordination Agreement, dated as of June 12, 2015, between
Monster Energy Company and The Coca-Cola Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to
our Form 10-Q dated August 10, 2015).
10.2 Amended and Restated International Distribution Coordination Agreement, dated as of June 12, 2015,
between Monster Energy Ltd. and Monster Energy Company and The Coca-Cola Company (incorporated
by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our Form 10-Q dated August 10, 2015).
10.3 Form of Indemnification Agreement (to be provided by Monster Beverage Corporation to its directors
and officers) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Form 8-K dated June 11, 2019).
10.4+ Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement pursuant to the Monster Beverage Corporation 2017
Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to our Form
10-K dated March 1, 2021).
10.5+ Form of Restricted Stock Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Form 10-Q dated
August 9, 2011).
10.6+ Monster Beverage Corporation 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1
to our Form 8-K dated May 24, 2011).
10.7+ Employment Agreement between Monster Beverage Corporation and Rodney C. Sacks (incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Form 8-K dated March 19, 2014).
10.8+ Employment Agreement between Monster Beverage Corporation and Hilton H. Schlosberg (incorporated
by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our Form 8-K dated March 19, 2014).
10.9+ Form of Stock Option Agreement for grants under the Monster Beverage Corporation 2011 Omnibus
Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.10 to our Form 10-K dated March 1, 2018).
10.10+ Form of Stock Option Agreement of Co-Chief Executive Officers for grants under the Monster Beverage
Corporation 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.11 to our Form 10-K
dated March 1, 2018).
10.11+ Form of 2020 Annual Incentive Award Agreement for grants under the Monster Beverage Corporation
2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Form 10-Q dated May
11, 2020).
10.12+ Form of Performance Share Unit Award Agreement for grants under the Monster Beverage Corporation
2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our Form 10-Q dated May
11, 2020).
10.13+ Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement for grants under the Monster Beverage Corporation 2011
Omnibus Incentive Plan
(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.13 to our Form 10-K dated March 1, 2021).

70

10.14+ Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement of Co-Chief Executive Officers for grants under the Monster
Beverage Corporation 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan
(incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.14 to our
Form 10-K dated March 1, 2021).
10.15+ Monster Beverage Corporation 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Appendix A
to our Definitive Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A, filed April 21, 2020).
10.16+ Monster Beverage Corporation 2017 Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors (incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 4.1 to our Form S-8 dated June 21, 2017).
10.17+ Monster Beverage Corporation Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors (incorporated
by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to our Form S-8 dated June 21, 2017).
10.18+ Amended and Restated Monster Beverage Corporation Deferred Compensation Plan (incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.14 to our Form 10-K dated March 1, 2018).
10.19+ Form of Stock Option Award Agreement for grants under the Monster Beverage Corporation 2020
Omnibus Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Form 10-Q dated May 7,
2021).
10.20+ Form of Annual Incentive Award Agreement for grants under the Monster Beverage Corporation 2020
Omnibus Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our Form 10-Q dated May 7,
2021).
10.21+ Form of Performance Share Unit Award Agreement for grants under the Monster Beverage Corporation
2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to our Form 10-Q dated May 7,
2021).
10.22+ Form of Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement for grants under the Monster Beverage Corporation
2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to our Form 10-Q dated May 7,
2021).
21* Subsidiaries
23* Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
31.1* Certification by Co-Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13A-14(a) or 15D-14(a) of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
31.2* Certification by Co-Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13A-14(a) or 15D-14(a) of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
31.3* Certification by Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13A-14(a) or 15D-14(a) of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.1* Certification by Co-Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to
Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.2* Certification by Co-Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to
Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.3* Certification by Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to
Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
101* The following materials from Monster Beverage Corporation’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the
fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 are furnished herewith, formatted in iXBRL (Inline eXtensible
Business Reporting Language): (i) Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2021 and 2020,
(ii) Consolidated Statements of Income for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019,
(iii) Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and
2019, (iv) Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020
and 2019, (v) Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and
2019, and (vi) Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
104* The cover page from Monster Beverage Corporation’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year
ended December 31, 2021, formatted in iXBRL (Inline eXtensible Business Reporting Language) and
contained in Exhibit 101.

 

*
+
Filed herewith.
Management contract or compensatory plans or arrangements.

71
SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of Sections 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended,
the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION
/s/ RODNEY C. SACKS Rodney C. Sacks Date: February 28, 2022
Chairman of the Board of
Directors and Co-Chief
Executive Officer
/s/ HILTON H. SCHLOSBERG Hilton H. Schlosberg Date: February 28, 2022
Vice Chairman of the Board of
Directors and Co-Chief
Executive Officer
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by
the following persons on behalf of the registrant in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
Signature Title Date
/s/ RODNEY C. SACKS Chairman of the Board of February 28, 2022
Rodney C. Sacks Directors and Co-Chief Executive
Officer (principal executive officer)
/s/ HILTON H. SCHLOSBERG Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors February 28, 2022
Hilton H. Schlosberg and Co-Chief Executive Officer (principal
executive officer)
/s/ THOMAS J. KELLY Chief Financial Officer (principal financial February 28, 2022
Thomas J. Kelly officer, principal accounting officer)
/s/ ANA DEMEL Director February 28, 2022
Ana Demel
/s/ JAMES L. DINKINS Director February 28, 2022
James L. Dinkins
/s/ GARY P. FAYARD Director February 28, 2022
Gary P. Fayard
/s/ MARK J. HALL Director February 28, 2022
Mark J. Hall
/s/ TIFFANY M. HALL Director February 28, 2022
Tiffany M. Hall
/s/ JEANNE P. JACKSON Director February 28, 2022
Jeanne P. Jackson
/s/ STEVEN G. PIZULA Director February 28, 2022
Steven G. Pizula
/s/ BENJAMIN M. POLK Director February 28, 2022
Benjamin M. Polk
/s/ MARK S. VIDERGAUZ Director February 28, 2022
Mark S. Vidergauz

72
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT
SCHEDULE
Page
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 73
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2021 and 2020 76
Consolidated Statements of Income for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 77
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 78
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 79
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 80
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 82
Financial Statement Schedule – Valuation and Qualifying Accounts for the years ended December 31,
2021, 2020 and 2019 114

73
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of
Monster Beverage Corporation
Corona, California
Opinion on the Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Monster Beverage Corporation and subsidiaries
(the “Company”) as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive
income, stockholders’ equity and cash flows, for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2021,
and the related notes and the schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a) (collectively referred to as the “financial
statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position
of the Company as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of
the three years in the period ended December 31, 2021, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted
in the United States of America.
We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States) (“PCAOB”), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2021, based on
criteria established in
Internal Control–Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring
Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated February 28, 2022, expressed an unqualified
opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
Basis for Opinion
These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an
opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with
the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal
securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the
PCAOB.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material
misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of
material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that
respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and
disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.
We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Critical Audit Matter
The critical audit matter communicated below is a matter arising from the current-period audit of the financial
statements that was communicated or required to be communicated to the Audit Committee and that (1) relates to
accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging,
subjective, or complex judgments. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion
on the financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matter below,
providing a separate opinion on the critical audit matter or on the accounts or disclosures to which it relates.

74
Accrued Promotional Allowances — Refer to Note 2 to the financial statements
Critical Audit Matter Description
The Company’s promotional and other allowances are calculated based on various programs with its
bottlers/distributors and retail customers, and accruals are established at the time of the initial product sale for the
Company’s anticipated liabilities. These accruals are based on agreed-upon terms as well as the Company’s
historical experience with similar programs and require management’s judgment with respect to estimating
consumer participation and/or bottler/distributor and retail customer performance levels. Promotional and other
allowances primarily include consideration given to bottlers/distributors or retail customers, including, but not
limited to, the following: (i) discounts granted off list prices to support price promotions to end consumers by
retailers; (ii) reimbursements given to bottlers/distributors for agreed portions of their promotional spend with
retailers, including slotting, shelf space allowances, and other fees for both new and existing products; (iii) agreed
share of fees given to bottlers/distributors and/or directly to retailers for advertising, in-store marketing, and
promotional activities; (iv) agreed share of slotting, shelf space allowances, and other fees given directly to retailers,
club stores and/or wholesalers; (v) incentives given to bottlers/distributors and/or retailers for achieving or
exceeding certain predetermined sales goals; (vi) discounted or free products; (vii) contractual fees given to
bottlers/distributors related to sales made by the Company directly to certain customers that fall within the
bottlers’/distributors’ sales territories; and (viii) certain commissions paid based on sales to bottlers/distributors.
The promotional programs are of varying durations, typically ranging from one week to one year based on the
agreed-upon terms. The nature of such programs is determined on a per retail customer basis, and in certain
instances, the same program is set for multiple retail customers. The promotional expenditures are recorded as a
reduction to net sales in the period the underlying sale occurs. Total promotional expenditures included as a
reduction to net sales were $924.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, and accrued promotional
allowances were $211.5 million as of December 31, 2021.
We identified accrued promotional allowances as a critical audit matter because of the extent and subjective nature
of management judgment required with respect to estimating consumer participation and/or distributor and retail
customer performance levels and future promotional claims.
How the Critical Audit Matter Was Addressed in the Audit
Our audit procedures over accrued promotional allowances, with respect to management’s judgment regarding
levels of consumer participation and/or distributor and retail customer performance levels and future promotional
claims, included the following, among others:
We tested the effectiveness of controls over accrued promotional allowances, including those controls
pertaining to management’s estimation of future promotional claims.
We selected a sample of accrued promotional allowances recorded for specific distributors and retail
customers and sent confirmation requests of the accrual recorded and key terms of the agreement
directly to the distributor or retail customer. We compared the confirmation response to the accrued
amount recorded by the Company. In instances of nonreplies to our confirmation request from the
distributor or retail customer, we performed alternative procedures as follows: (1) developing an
expectation of the accrual using current-year claim and payment data, and/or (2) vouching known claim
submissions, unpaid as of period-end, to underlying supporting documentation.
We tested the promotional expenditure amount recorded as a reduction to net sales and assessed the
reasonableness of management’s estimate by developing an expectation of the amount, based on
historical promotional expenditure amounts recorded as a percentage of sales, and compared our
expectation to the recorded promotional expenditure amount.

75
We performed inquiries with the Company’s sales and marketing personnel to corroborate our
understanding of new and existing promotional programs that may alter the relationship between gross
billings and promotional allowances, as such programs are considered by management when estimating
future promotional claims.
We evaluated management’s ability to estimate promotional allowances by comparing the actual
promotional allowances subsequently paid to the original estimates of management.
/s/ DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP
Costa Mesa, California
February 28, 2022
We have served as the Company’s auditor since 1991.

76
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2021 AND 2020 (In Thousands, Except Par Value)
December 31, December 31,
2021 2020
ASSETS
CURRENT ASSETS:

Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,326,462 $ 1,180,413
Short-term investments 1,749,727 881,354
Accounts receivable, net 896,658 666,012
Inventories 593,357 333,085
Prepaid expenses and other current assets 82,668 55,358
Prepaid income taxes 33,238 24,733
Total current assets 4,682,110 3,140,955

 

INVESTMENTS 99,419 44,291
PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, net 313,753 314,656
DEFERRED INCOME TAXES 225,221 241,650
GOODWILL 1,331,643 1,331,643
OTHER INTANGIBLE ASSETS, net 1,072,386 1,059,046
OTHER ASSETS 80,252 70,475
Total Assets $ 7,804,784 $ 6,202,716

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
CURRENT LIABILITIES:

Accounts payable $ 404,263 $ 296,800
Accrued liabilities 210,964 142,653
Accrued promotional allowances 211,461 186,658
Deferred revenue 42,530 45,429
Accrued compensation 65,459 55,015
Income taxes payable 30,399 23,433
Total current liabilities 965,076 749,988

DEFERRED REVENUE 243,249 264,436
OTHER LIABILITIES 29,508 27,432
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Note 12)
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY:
Common stock – $0.005 par value; 1,250,000 shares authorized; 640,043 shares issued
and 529,323 shares outstanding as of December 31, 2021; 638,662 shares issued and

528,097 shares outstanding as of December 31, 2020 3,200 3,193
Additional paid-in capital 4,652,620 4,537,982
Retained earnings 7,809,549 6,432,074
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income
Common stock in treasury, at cost; 110,720 shares and 110,565 shares as of
December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively
Total stockholders’ equity
(69,165) 3,034
(5,829,253)
6,566,951
(5,815,423)
5,160,860
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity $ 7,804,784 $ 6,202,716

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
77
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2021, 2020 AND 2019
(In Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
2021 2020 2019

NET SALES
COST OF SALES
$ 5,541,352
2,432,839
$ 4,598,638
1,874,758
$ 4,200,819
1,682,234

GROSS PROFIT 3,108,513 2,723,880 2,518,585
OPERATING EXPENSES 1,311,046 1,090,727 1,115,646
OPERATING INCOME 1,797,467 1,633,153 1,402,939
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE), NET 3,952 (6,996) 13,023
INCOME BEFORE PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES 1,801,419 1,626,157 1,415,962
PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES 423,944 216,563 308,127
NET INCOME $ 1,377,475 $ 1,409,594 $ 1,107,835
NET INCOME PER COMMON SHARE:

Basic
Diluted
$
$
2.61
2.57
$
$
2.66
2.64
$
$
2.04
2.03

WEIGHTED AVERAGE NUMBER OF SHARES OF COMMON
STOCK AND COMMON STOCK EQUIVALENTS:

Basic 528,763 529,639 542,191
Diluted 535,639 534,807 546,608

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
78
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2021, 2020 AND 2019 (In Thousands)
2021 2020 2019

Net income, as reported
Other comprehensive (loss) income:
Change in foreign currency translation adjustment, net of tax
Available-for-sale investments:
Change in net unrealized gains (losses)
Reclassification adjustment for net gains included in net income
Net change in available-for-sale investments
Other comprehensive (loss) income
Comprehensive income
$ 1,377,475 $ 1,409,594 $ 1,107,835
(71,158) 35,531 194
(1,041)

(1,041)
(72,199)
$ 1,305,276
(110)

(110)
35,421
$ 1,445,015
283

283
477
$ 1,108,312

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
79
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2021, 2020 AND 2019 (In Thousands)
Accumulated
Other Total
Common Stock Additional Retained Comprehensive Treasury Stock Stockholders’
Shares Amount Paid-in Capital Earnings Loss Shares Amount Equity
Balance, January 1, 2019
630,970 $ 3,155 $ 4,238,170 $ 3,914,645 $ (32,864) (87,294) $ (4,512,205) $ 3,610,901
Stock-based compensation — — 63,356 — — — — 63,356
Exercise of stock options 5,490 27 92,336 — — — — 92,363
Unrealized gain on available-forsale securities — — — — 283 — — 283
Adjustment to excess tax benefits
from prior periods — — 3,649 — — — — 3,649
Repurchase of common stock — — — — — (12,468) (707,300) (707,300)
Foreign currency translation — — — — 194 — — 194
Net income — — — 1,107,835 — — — 1,107,835
Balance, December 31, 2019 636,460 $ 3,182 $ 4,397,511 $ 5,022,480 $ (32,387) (99,762) $ (5,219,505) $ 4,171,281
Stock-based compensation — — 67,546 — — — — 67,546
Exercise of stock options 2,202 11 72,925 — — — — 72,936
Unrealized loss on available-forsale securities — — — — (110) — — (110)
Repurchase of common stock — — — — — (10,803) (595,918) (595,918)
Foreign currency translation — — — — 35,531 — — 35,531
Net income — — — 1,409,594 — — — 1,409,594
Balance, December 31, 2020 638,662 $ 3,193 $ 4,537,982 $ 6,432,074 $ 3,034 (110,565) $ (5,815,423) $ 5,160,860
Stock-based compensation — — 68,922 — — — — 68,922
Exercise of stock options 1,381 7 45,716 — — — — 45,723
Unrealized loss on available-forsale securities — — — — (1,041) — — (1,041)
Repurchase of common stock — — — — — (155) (13,830) (13,830)
Foreign currency translation — — — — (71,158) — — (71,158)
Net income — — — 1,377,475 — — — 1,377,475
Balance, December 31, 2021 640,043 $ 3,200 $ 4,652,620 $ 7,809,549 $ (69,165) (110,720) $ (5,829,253) $ 6,566,951
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
80
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2021, 2020 AND 2019 (In Thousands)
2021 2020 2019
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

Net income
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization
$ 1,377,475 $ 1,409,594 $ 1,107,835
50,155 57,030 60,727
Non-cash lease expense
Gain on disposal of property and equipment
Loss on impairment of intangibles
4,107
(1,013)
3,943
(350)
8,700
4,087
(252)
Stock-based compensation 70,483 70,289 63,356
Deferred income taxes
Effect on cash of changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Accounts receivable
Inventories
16,429 (156,873) 1,263
(254,228)
(277,793)
(119,672)
30,304
(59,941)
(85,222)
Prepaid expenses and other assets (29,341) 1,024 (13,774)
Prepaid income taxes (10,919) 5,516 9,481
Accounts payable 114,297 18,696 28,832
Accrued liabilities 71,586 26,113 (14,018)
Accrued promotional allowances 31,498 13,762 21,943
Accrued compensation 7,950 7,501 7,228
Income taxes payable 7,221 10,422 8,105
Other liabilities
Deferred revenue
Net cash provided by operating activities
492
(22,658)
1,155,741
(356)
(21,480)
1,364,163
(1,030)
(24,858)
1,113,762

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

Sales of available-for-sale investments 1,488,599 920,196 851,436
Proceeds from sale of property and equipment
Purchases of available-for-sale investments
Purchases of property and equipment
Additions to intangibles
Increase in other assets
Net cash used in investing activities
1,328
(2,413,143)
(43,868)
(13,585)
(11,353)
(992,022)
993
(1,299,981)
(48,722)
(18,550)
(26,423)
(472,487)
1,239
(1,067,736)
(101,661)
(8,737)
(1,265)
(326,724)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

Borrowings (payments) on debt
Issuance of common stock
Purchases of common stock held in treasury
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
2,928
45,723
(13,830)
34,821
(3,086)
72,936
(595,918)
(526,068)
(13,569)
92,363
(707,300)
(628,506)

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents (52,491) 16,848 1,912

NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS 146,049 382,456 160,444
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, beginning of year 1,180,413 797,957 637,513
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, end of year $ 1,326,462 $ 1,180,413 $ 797,957

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION:
Cash paid during the year for:
Interest $ 134 $ 44 $ 320
Income taxes $ 420,521 $ 355,509 $ 293,810
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
81
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Continued)
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2021, 2020 AND 2019
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NON-CASH ITEMS:
Included in accrued liabilities as of December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 were $14.0 million, $9.8 million
and $12.8 million, respectively, related to net additions to other intangible assets.
Accounts payable included purchases of available-for-sale short-term investments of $8.7 million as of
December 31, 2019. No purchases of available-for-sale investments were included in accounts payable as of
December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
82
1. ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Organization – Monster Beverage Corporation (the “Company”) was incorporated in the state of Delaware.
The Company is a holding company and has no operating business except through its consolidated subsidiaries.
Nature of Operations – The Company develops, markets, sells and distributes energy drink beverages and
concentrates for energy drink beverages, primarily under the following brand names: Monster Energy®, Monster
Energy Ultra®, Rehab® Monster, Java Monster®, Muscle Monster®, Espresso Monster®, Punch Monster®, Juice
Monster®, Monster Hydro® Energy Water, Monster Hydro® Super Sport, Monster HydroSport Super Fuel®,
Monster Super Fuel®, Monster Dragon Tea®, Reign Total Body Fuel®, Reign Inferno® Thermogenic Fuel,
NOS®, Full Throttle®, Burn®, Mother®, Nalu®, Ultra Energy®, Play® and Power Play® (stylized), Relentless®,
BPM®, BU®, Gladiator®, Samurai®, Live+®, Predator®, Fury® and True North®.
Basis of Presentation – The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in
accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and include
the accounts of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries.
Principles of Consolidation – The Company consolidates all entities that it controls by ownership of a
majority voting interest. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.
Business Combinations – Business acquisitions are accounted for in accordance with Financial Accounting
Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 805 “Business Combinations”. FASB
ASC 805 requires the reporting entity to identify the acquirer, determine the acquisition date, recognize and measure
the identifiable tangible and intangible assets acquired, the liabilities assumed and any non-controlling interest in
the acquired entity, and recognize and measure goodwill or a gain from the purchase. The acquiree’s results are
included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements from the date of acquisition. Assets acquired and
liabilities assumed are recorded at their fair values and the excess of the purchase price over the amounts assigned
is recorded as goodwill. Adjustments to fair value assessments are recorded to goodwill over the measurement
period (not longer than twelve months). The acquisition method also requires that acquisition-related transaction
and post-acquisition restructuring costs be charged to expense and requires the Company to recognize and measure
certain assets and liabilities including those arising from contingencies and contingent consideration in a business
combination.
Cash and Cash Equivalents – The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original
maturity of three months or less from date of purchase to be cash equivalents. Throughout the year, the Company
has had amounts on deposit at financial institutions that exceed the federally insured limits. The Company has not
experienced any loss as a result of these deposits and does not expect to incur any losses in the future.
Investments – The Company’s investments in debt securities are classified as either held-to-maturity,
available-for-sale or trading, in accordance with FASB ASC 320. Held-to-maturity securities are those securities
that the Company has the positive intent and ability to hold until maturity. Trading securities are those securities
that the Company intends to sell in the near term. All other securities not included in the held-to-maturity or trading
category are classified as available-for-sale. Held-to-maturity securities are recorded at amortized cost which
approximates fair market value. Trading securities are carried at fair value with unrealized gains and losses charged
to earnings. Available-for-sale securities are carried at fair value with unrealized gains and losses recorded within
accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) as a separate component of stockholders’ equity. FASB ASC 820
defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly
transaction between market participants at the measurement date. FASB ASC 820 also establishes a fair value
hierarchy which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs, where available. Under FASB ASC
326-30-35, a security is considered to be impaired if the fair value of the security is less than its amortized cost

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
83
basis. Where the decline in fair value below the amortized cost basis has resulted from a credit loss, the Company
will record an impairment relating to credit losses through an allowance for credit losses. The allowance is limited
by the amount that the fair value is less than the amortized cost basis. Impairment that has not been recorded through
an allowance for credit losses is recorded through other comprehensive income (loss), net of applicable taxes. The
Company evaluates whether the decline in fair value of its investments has resulted from credit loss or other factors
at each quarter-end. This evaluation consists of a review by management, and includes market pricing information
and maturity dates for the securities held, market and economic trends in the industry and information on the issuer’s
financial condition and, if applicable, information on the guarantors’ financial condition. Factors considered in
determining whether an impairment has resulted from credit loss or other factors include the length of time and
extent to which the investment’s fair value has been less than its cost basis, the financial condition and near-term
prospects of the issuer and guarantors, including any specific events which may influence the operations of the
issuer and the Company’s intent and ability to retain the investment for a reasonable period of time sufficient to
allow for any anticipated recovery of fair value.
Accounts Receivable – The Company evaluates the collectability of its trade accounts receivable based on
a number of factors. In circumstances where the Company becomes aware of a specific customer’s inability to meet
its financial obligations to the Company, a specific reserve for bad debts is estimated and recorded, which reduces
the recognized receivable to the estimated amount the Company believes will ultimately be collected. In addition
to specific customer identification of potential bad debts, bad debt charges are recorded based on the Company’s
recent loss history and an overall assessment of past due trade accounts receivable outstanding. In accordance with
FASB ASC 210-20-45, in its consolidated balance sheets, the Company has presented accounts receivable, net of
promotional allowances, only for those customers that it allows net settlement. All other accounts receivable and
related promotional allowances are shown on a gross basis.
Inventories – Inventories are valued at the lower of first-in, first-out, cost or market value (net realizable
value).
Property and Equipment – Property and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation of furniture and fixtures,
office and computer equipment, computer software, equipment, real property and vehicles is based on their
estimated useful lives (three to thirty years) and is calculated using the straight-line method. Amortization of
leasehold improvements is based on the lesser of their estimated useful lives or the terms of the related leases and
is calculated using the straight-line method. Normal repairs and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred.
Expenditures that materially increase values or extend useful lives are capitalized. The related costs and
accumulated depreciation of disposed assets are eliminated and any resulting gain or loss on disposition is included
in net income.
Goodwill – The Company records goodwill when the consideration paid for an acquisition exceeds the fair
value of net tangible and intangible assets acquired, including related tax effects. Goodwill is not amortized; instead,
goodwill is tested for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if the Company believes indicators of
impairment exist. The Company first assesses qualitative factors to determine whether it is more-likely-than-not
that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value. If the Company reasonably determines that it is
more-likely-than-not that the fair value is less than the carrying value, the Company performs its annual, or interim,
goodwill impairment test by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount. The Company
will recognize an impairment for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds a reporting unit’s fair value.
For the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 there were no impairments recorded and there are no
accumulated impairment balances.
Other Intangibles – Other Intangibles are comprised primarily of trademarks that represent the Company’s
exclusive ownership of the Monster Energy®, ®, Monster Energy Ultra®, Monster Dragon Tea®, Unleash the
Beast!®, Rehab® Monster, Java Monster®, Muscle Monster®, Espresso Monster®, Punch Monster®, Juice

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
84
Monster®, Monster Hydro®, Monster HydroSport Super Fuel®, Monster Super Fuel®, Reign Total Body Fuel®,
Reign Inferno®, Predator®, Fury®, True North®, NOS®, Full Throttle®, Burn®, Mother®, Nalu®, Ultra
Energy®, Play® and Power Play® (stylized), Relentless®, BPM®, BU®, Gladiator®, and Samurai® trademarks,
all used in connection with the manufacture, sale and distribution of beverages. The Company also owns a number
of other trademarks, flavors and formulas in the United States, as well as in a number of countries around the world.
In accordance with FASB ASC 350, intangible assets with indefinite lives are not amortized but instead are
measured for impairment at least annually, or when events indicate that an impairment exists. The Company
calculates impairment as the excess of the carrying value of its indefinite-lived assets over their estimated fair value.
If the carrying value exceeds the estimate of fair value a write-down is recorded. The Company amortizes its
trademarks with finite useful lives over their respective useful lives. For the years ended December 31, 2021 and
2019 no impairments were recorded. For the year ended December 31, 2020, an impairment charge of $8.7 million
was recorded to intangibles.
Leases – See Note 3.
Long-Lived Assets – Management regularly reviews property and equipment and other long-lived assets,
including certain definite-lived intangible assets, for possible impairment. This review occurs annually, or more
frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable.
If there is indication of impairment, management then prepares an estimate of future cash flows (undiscounted and
without interest charges) expected to result from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition. If these cash flows
are less than the carrying amount of the asset, an impairment loss is recognized to write down the asset to its
estimated fair value. The fair value is estimated using the present value of the future cash flows discounted at a rate
commensurate with management’s estimates of the business risks. Preparation of estimated expected future cash
flows is inherently subjective and is based on management’s best estimate of assumptions concerning expected
future conditions. For the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, there were no impairment indicators
identified. Long-lived assets held for sale are recorded at the lower of their carrying amount or fair value less cost
to sell.
Foreign Currency Translation and Transactions – The accounts of the Company’s foreign subsidiaries are
translated in accordance with FASB ASC 830. Foreign currency transaction gains and losses are recognized in other
expense, net, at the time they occur. Net foreign currency exchange gains or losses resulting from the translation of
assets and liabilities of foreign subsidiaries whose functional currency is not the U.S. dollar are recorded as a part
of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in stockholders’ equity. Unrealized foreign currency exchange
gains and losses on certain intercompany transactions that are of a long-term investment nature (i.e., settlement is
not planned or anticipated in the foreseeable future) are also recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income
(loss) in stockholders’ equity. During the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, the Company entered
into forward currency exchange contracts with financial institutions to create an economic hedge to specifically
manage a portion of the foreign exchange risk exposure associated with certain consolidated subsidiaries nonfunctional currency denominated assets and liabilities. All foreign currency exchange contracts outstanding as of
December 31, 2021 have terms of three months or less. The Company does not enter into forward currency exchange
contracts for speculation or trading purposes.
The Company has not designated its foreign currency exchange contracts as hedge transactions under FASB
ASC 815. Therefore, gains and losses on the Company’s foreign currency exchange contracts are recognized in
other income, net, in the consolidated statements of income, and are largely offset by the changes in the fair value
of the underlying economically hedged item. For the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, aggregate
foreign currency transaction gains (losses), including the gains or losses on forward currency exchange contracts,
amounted to $0.3 million, ($11.2) million and ($4.1) million, respectively, and have been recorded in other income,
net, in the accompanying consolidated statements of income.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
85
Revenue Recognition – See Note 2.
Cost of Sales – Cost of sales consists of the costs of flavors, concentrates, supplement ingredients and/or
beverage bases, the costs of raw materials utilized in the manufacture of beverages, co-packing fees, repacking fees,
in-bound freight charges, as well as internal transfer costs, warehouse expenses incurred prior to the manufacture
of the Company’s finished products and certain quality control costs. In addition, the Company includes in costs of
sales certain costs such as depreciation, amortization and payroll costs that relate to the direct manufacture by the
Company of certain flavors and concentrates. Raw materials account for the largest portion of cost of sales. Raw
materials include cans, bottles, other containers, flavors, ingredients and packaging materials.
Operating Expenses – Operating expenses include selling expenses such as distribution expenses to
transport products to customers and warehousing expenses after manufacture, as well as expenses for advertising,
sampling and in-store demonstration costs, costs for merchandise displays, point-of-sale materials and premium
items, sponsorship expenses, other marketing expenses and design expenses. Operating expenses also include such
costs as payroll costs, travel costs, professional service fees including legal fees, termination payments made to
certain of the Company’s prior distributors, depreciation and other general and administrative costs.
Freight-Out Costs – For the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, freight-out costs amounted
to $213.9 million, $134.1 million and $122.5 million, respectively, and have been recorded in operating expenses
in the accompanying consolidated statements of income.
Advertising and Promotional Expenses – The Company accounts for advertising production costs by
expensing such production costs the first time the related advertising takes place. A significant amount of the
Company’s promotional expenses result from payments under endorsement and sponsorship contracts. Accounting
for endorsement and sponsorship payments is based upon specific contract provisions. Generally, endorsement and
sponsorship payments are expensed on a straight-line basis over the term of the contract after giving recognition to
the periodic performance compliance provisions of the contracts. Advertising and promotional expenses, including,
but not limited to, production costs amounted to $417.6 million, $345.7 million and $391.6 million for the years
ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Advertising and promotional expenses are included in
operating expenses in the accompanying consolidated statements of income.
Income Taxes – The Company utilizes the liability method of accounting for income taxes as set forth in
FASB ASC 740. Under the liability method, deferred taxes are determined based on the temporary differences
between the financial statement and tax basis of assets and liabilities using tax rates expected to be in effect during
the years in which the basis differences reverse. A valuation allowance is recorded when it is more likely than not
that some of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. In determining the need for valuation allowances the
Company considers projected future taxable income and the availability of tax planning strategies. If in the future
the Company determines that it would not be able to realize its recorded deferred tax assets, an increase in the
valuation allowance would be recorded, decreasing earnings in the period in which such determination is made.
The Company assesses its income tax positions and records tax benefits for all years subject to examination
based upon the Company’s evaluation of the facts, circumstances and information available at the reporting date.
For those tax positions where there is a greater than 50% likelihood that a tax benefit will be sustained, the Company
has recorded the largest amount of tax benefit that may potentially be realized upon ultimate settlement with a taxing
authority that has full knowledge of all relevant information. For those income tax positions where there is less than
50% likelihood that a tax benefit will be sustained, no tax benefit has been recognized in the financial statements.
Stock-Based Compensation – The Company accounts for stock-based compensation under the provisions
of FASB ASC 718. The Company records compensation expense for employee stock options based on the estimated
fair value of the options on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing formula. The Company
records compensation expense for non-employee stock options based on the estimated fair value of the options as

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
86
of the earlier of (1) the date at which a commitment for performance by the non-employee to earn the stock option
is reached or (2) the date at which the non-employee’s performance is complete, using the Black-Scholes-Merton
option pricing formula. Stock-based compensation cost for restricted stock units and performance share units is
measured based on the closing fair market value of the Company’s common stock at the date of grant. In the event
that the Company has the option and intent to settle a restricted stock unit or performance share unit in cash, the
award is classified as a liability and revalued at each balance sheet date. See Note 15.
Net Income Per Common Share – In accordance with FASB ASC 260, net income per common share, on a
basic and diluted basis, is presented for all periods. Basic net income per share is computed by dividing net income
by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during each period. Diluted net income per share
is computed by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common and dilutive common equivalent
shares outstanding. The calculation of common equivalent shares assumes the exercise of dilutive stock options,
net of assumed treasury share repurchases at average market prices, as applicable.
Concentration of Risk – Certain of the Company’s products utilize components (raw materials and/or copacking services) from a limited number of sources. A disruption in the supply of such components could
significantly affect the Company’s revenues from those products, as alternative sources of such components may
not be available at commercially reasonable rates or within a reasonably short time period. The Company continues
to endeavor to secure the availability of alternative sources for such components and minimize the risk of any
disruption in production.
The Coca-Cola Company (“TCCC”), through certain wholly-owned subsidiaries (the “TCCC
Subsidiaries”), accounted for approximately 2% of the Company’s net sales for the years ended December 31, 2021,
2020 and 2019.
Coca-Cola Consolidated, Inc. accounted for approximately 12%, 12% and 13% of the Company’s net sales
for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Reyes Coca-Cola Bottling, LLC accounted for approximately 10%, 11% and 11% of the Company’s net
sales for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Coca-Cola Europacific Partners accounted for approximately 12%, 10% and 10% of the Company’s net
sales for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Credit Risk – The Company sells its products nationally and internationally, primarily to bottlers and full
service beverage distributors, retail grocery and specialty chains, wholesalers, club stores, mass merchandisers,
convenience chains, drug stores, foodservice customers, value stores, e-commerce retailers and the military. The
Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers and generally does not require collateral. The
Company maintains reserves for estimated credit losses, and historically, such losses have been within
management’s expectations.
Fair Value of Financial Instruments – The carrying value of the Company’s financial instruments, including
cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, approximate fair value due
to the relatively short maturity of the respective instruments.
Use of Estimates – The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP
requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities
and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of
revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
87
Recent Accounting Pronouncements – In October 2021, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update
(“ASU”) No. 2021-08, “Accounting for Contract Assets and Contract Liabilities from Contracts with Customers
(Topic 805)”. ASU No. 2021-08 requires an acquirer in a business combination to recognize and measure contract
assets and contract liabilities (deferred revenue) from acquired contracts using the revenue recognition guidance in
Topic 606. At the acquisition date, the acquirer applies the revenue model as if it had originated the acquired
contracts. The ASU is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2022, including interim periods
within those fiscal years. Adoption of the ASU should be applied prospectively. Early adoption is also permitted,
including adoption in an interim period. If early adopted, the amendments are applied retrospectively to all business
combinations for which the acquisition date occurred during the fiscal year of adoption. The Company is currently
evaluating the impact of ASU No. 2021-08 on its financial position, results of operations and liquidity.
2. REVENUE RECOGNITION
Revenues are accounted for in accordance with ASC 606 “Revenue from Contracts with Consumers”. The
Company has three operating and reportable segments: (i) Monster Energy® Drinks segment (“Monster Energy®
Drinks”), which is primarily comprised of the Company’s Monster Energy® drinks, Reign Total Body Fuel® high
performance energy drinks and True North® Pure Energy Seltzers, (ii) Strategic Brands segment (“Strategic
Brands”), which is primarily comprised of the various energy drink brands acquired from The Coca-Cola Company
(“TCCC”) in 2015 as well as the Company’s affordable energy brands, and (iii) Other segment (“Other”), which is
comprised of certain products sold by American Fruits and Flavors, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the
Company, to independent third-party customers (the “AFF Third-Party Products”).
The Company’s Monster Energy® Drinks segment generates net operating revenues by selling ready-todrink packaged energy drinks primarily to bottlers and full service beverage bottlers/distributors
(“bottlers/distributors”). In some cases, the Company sells ready-to-drink packaged energy drinks directly to retail
grocery and specialty chains, wholesalers, club stores, mass merchandisers, convenience chains, drug stores,
foodservice customers, value stores, e-commerce retailers and the military.
The Company’s Strategic Brands segment primarily generates net operating revenues by selling
“concentrates” and/or “beverage bases” to authorized bottling and canning operations. Such bottlers generally
combine the concentrates and/or beverage bases with sweeteners, water and other ingredients to produce ready-todrink packaged energy drinks. The ready-to-drink packaged energy drinks are then sold by such bottlers to other
bottlers/distributors and to retail grocery and specialty chains, wholesalers, club stores, mass merchandisers,
convenience chains, foodservice customers, drug stores, value stores, e-commerce retailers and the military. To a
lesser extent, the Strategic Brands segment generates net operating revenues by selling certain ready-to-drink
packaged energy drinks to bottlers/distributors.
The majority of the Company’s revenue is recognized when it satisfies a single performance obligation by
transferring control of its products to a customer. Control is generally transferred when the Company’s products are
either shipped or delivered based on the terms contained within the underlying contracts or agreements. Certain of
the Company’s bottlers/distributors may also perform a separate function as a co-packer on the Company’s behalf.
In such cases, control of the Company’s products passes to such bottlers/distributors when they notify the Company
that they have taken possession or transferred the relevant portion of the Company’s finished goods. The Company’s
general payment terms are short-term in duration. The Company does not have significant financing components
or payment terms. The Company did not have any material unsatisfied performance obligations as of December 31,
2021 and December 31, 2020.
The Company excludes from revenues all taxes assessed by a governmental authority that are imposed on
the sale of its products and collected from customers.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
88
Distribution expenses to transport the Company’s products, where applicable, and warehousing expense
after manufacture are accounted for within operating expenses in the consolidated statements of income.
Promotional and other allowances (variable consideration) recorded as a reduction to net sales, primarily
include consideration given to the Company’s bottlers/distributors or retail customers including, but not limited to
the following:
discounts granted off list prices to support price promotions to end-consumers by retailers;
reimbursements given to the Company’s bottlers/distributors for agreed portions of their
promotional spend with retailers, including slotting, shelf space allowances and other fees for both
new and existing products;
the Company’s agreed share of fees given to bottlers/distributors and/or directly to retailers for
advertising, in-store marketing and promotional activities;
the Company’s agreed share of slotting, shelf space allowances and other fees given directly to
retailers, club stores and/or wholesalers;
incentives given to the Company’s bottlers/distributors and/or retailers for achieving or exceeding
certain predetermined sales goals;
discounted or free products;
contractual fees given to the Company’s bottlers/distributors related to sales made directly by the
Company to certain customers that fall within the bottlers’/distributors’ sales territories; and
commissions to TCCC based on the Company’s sales to wholly-owned subsidiaries of TCCC (the
“TCCC Subsidiaries”) and/or to TCCC bottlers/distributors accounted for under the equity method
by TCCC (the “TCCC Related Parties”).
The Company’s promotional allowance programs with its bottlers/distributors and/or retailers are executed
through separate agreements in the ordinary course of business. These agreements generally provide for one or
more of the arrangements described above and are of varying durations, typically ranging from one week to one
year. The Company’s promotional and other allowances are calculated based on various programs with
bottlers/distributors and retail customers, and accruals are established at the time of initial product sale for the
Company’s anticipated liabilities. These accruals are based on agreed upon terms as well as the Company’s
historical experience with similar programs and require management’s judgment with respect to estimating
consumer participation and/or bottler/distributor and retail customer performance levels. Differences between such
estimated expenses and actual expenses for promotional and other allowance costs have historically been
insignificant and are recognized in earnings in the period such differences are determined.
Amounts received pursuant to new and/or amended distribution agreements entered into with certain
bottlers/distributors relating to the costs associated with terminating the Company’s prior distributors, are accounted
for as deferred revenue and recognized as revenue ratably over the anticipated life of the respective distribution
agreements, generally over 20 years.
The Company also sells and/or enters into license agreements that generate revenues associated with thirdparty sales of non-beverage products bearing the Company’s trademarks including, but not limited to, clothing,
backpacks, hats, t-shirts, jackets, helmets and automotive wheels.
Management believes that adequate provision has been made for cash discounts, returns and spoilage based
on the Company’s historical experience.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
89
Disaggregation of Revenue
The following table disaggregates the Company’s revenue by geographical markets and reportable
segments:
Year Ended December 31, 2021
Latin
America
U.S. and and
Net Sales Canada EMEA
1 Asia Pacific Caribbean Total

Monster Energy® Drinks
Strategic Brands
$ 3,455,704
158,390
$ 1,004,005
99,423
$ 446,023
26,811
$ 314,941
10,138
$ 5,220,673
294,762
Other
Total Net Sales
25,917
$ 3,640,011

$ 1,103,428

$ 472,834

$ 325,079
25,917
$ 5,541,352

Year Ended December 31, 2020
Latin
America
U.S. and and
Net Sales Canada EMEA
1 Asia Pacific Caribbean Total

Monster Energy® Drinks
Strategic Brands
$ 3,020,667
166,861
$ 675,045
70,782
$ 400,317
23,475
$ 209,217
5,236
$ 4,305,246
266,354
Other
Total Net Sales
27,038
$ 3,214,566

$ 745,827

$ 423,792

$ 214,453
27,038
$ 4,598,638

Year Ended December 31, 2019
Latin
America
U.S. and and
Net Sales Canada EMEA
1 Asia Pacific Caribbean Total

Monster Energy® Drinks
Strategic Brands
$ 2,799,701
173,968
$ 599,706
74,803
$ 326,684
25,060
$ 177,938
1,094
$ 3,904,029
274,925
Other
Total Net Sales
21,865
$ 2,995,534

$ 674,509

$ 351,744

$ 179,032
21,865
$ 4,200,819

1Europe, Middle East and Africa (“EMEA”)
Contract Liabilities
Amounts received from certain bottlers/distributors at inception of their distribution contracts or at the
inception of certain sales/marketing programs are accounted for as deferred revenue. As of December 31, 2021 and
2020, the Company had $285.8 million and $309.9 million of deferred revenue, respectively, which is included in
current and long-term deferred revenue in the Company’s consolidated balance sheet. During the years ended
December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, $41.5 million, $42.1 million and $46.3 million, respectively, of deferred
revenue, was recognized in net sales. See Note 10.
3. LEASES
The Company leases identified assets comprising real estate and equipment. Real estate leases consist
primarily of office and warehouse space and equipment leases consist of vehicles and warehouse equipment. At the
inception of a contract, the Company assesses whether the contract is, or contains, a lease. The Company’s

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
90
assessment is based on: (1) whether the contract involves the use of a distinct identified asset, (2) whether the
Company obtains the right to substantially all the economic benefit from the use of the asset throughout the term,
and (3) whether the Company has the right to direct the use of the asset. At inception of a lease, the Company
allocates the consideration in the contract to each lease and non-lease component based on the component’s relative
stand-alone price to determine the lease payments. Lease and non-lease components are accounted for separately.
Leases are classified as either finance leases or operating leases based on criteria in ASC 842, “Leases”.
The Company’s operating leases are comprised of real estate and warehouse equipment, and the Company’s finance
leases are comprised of vehicles.
Right-of-use (“ROU”) assets and lease liabilities are recognized at the lease commencement date based on
the present value of lease payments over the lease term. As the Company’s leases generally do not provide an
implicit rate, the Company uses its incremental borrowing rate based on the estimated rate of interest for
collateralized borrowing over a similar term of the lease payments at commencement date. ROU assets also include
any lease payments made and exclude lease incentives. Lease terms include options to extend or terminate the lease
when it is reasonably certain that the Company will exercise that option.
Certain of the Company’s real estate leases contain variable lease payments, including payments based on
an index or rate. Variable lease payments based on an index or rate are initially measured using the index or rate in
effect at the lease commencement date. Additional payments based on the change in an index or rate, or payments
based on a change in the Company’s portion of real estate taxes and insurance, are recorded as a period expense
when incurred.
Lease expense for operating leases, consisting of lease payments, is recognized on a straight-line basis over
the lease term and is included in operating expenses in the consolidated statement of income. Lease expense for
finance leases consists of the amortization of the ROU asset on a straight-line basis over the asset’s estimated useful
life and is included in operating expenses in the consolidated statement of income. Interest expense on finance
leases is calculated using the amortized cost basis and is included in other income (expense), net in the consolidated
statement of income.
The Company’s leases have remaining lease terms of less than one year to 12 years, some of which include
options to extend the leases for up to five years, and some of which include options to terminate the leases within
one year. The Company has elected not to recognize ROU assets and lease liabilities for short-term operating leases
that have a term of 12 months or less.
The components of lease cost for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 were as follows:
2021 2020 2019
Operating lease cost $ 4,614 $ 4,637 $ 4,899
Short-term lease cost 5,218 3,408 3,406
Variable lease cost 710 719 640
Finance leases:
Amortization of ROU assets 546 626 436
Interest on lease liabilities 19 39 56
Finance lease cost 565 665 492
Total lease cost $ 11,107 $ 9,429 $ 9,437

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
91
Supplemental cash flow information for leases for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
were as follows:
2021 2020 2019
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities:

Operating cash flows from operating leases
Operating cash flows from finance leases
$ 4,123
19
$ 3,982
39
$ 4,077
56
Financing cash flows from finance leases 2,698 3,086 2,223

ROU assets obtained in exchange for lease obligations:

Finance leases 2,878 2,417 2,866
Operating leases 4,313 3,003 34,931

ROU assets for operating and finance leases recognized in the consolidated balance sheets were
comprised of the following at:
December 31, 2021
Real Estate Equipment Total Balance Sheet Location
Operating leases $ 22,518 $

639
2,646
$ 23,157
2,646
Other Assets
Property and Equipment, net

Finance leases — December 31, 2020
Real Estate Equipment Total Balance Sheet Location

Operating leases
Finance leases
$ 22,565
$ 189
2,120
$ 22,754
2,120
Other Assets
Property and Equipment, net

Operating and finance lease liabilities recognized in the consolidated balance sheets were as follows at:
December 31, 2021
Operating Leases Finance Leases
Accrued liabilities $ 3,990 $ 960
Other liabilities 17,389 41
Total $ 21,379 $ 1,001
December 31, 2020
Operating Leases Finance Leases
Accrued liabilities $ 3,171 $ 799
Other liabilities 17,342 24
Total $ 20,513 $ 823
The weighted-average remaining lease terms and weighted-average discount rates for operating and finance
leases were as follows at:
December 31, 2021

Operating Leases
8.1
Finance Leases
0.7

Weighted-average remaining lease term (years) Weighted-average discount rate 3.5 % 1.3 %
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
92
December 31, 2020

Operating Leases
9.4
3.6 %
Finance Leases
0.6
1.9 %
Weighted-average remaining lease term (years)
Weighted-average discount rate

The following table reconciles the undiscounted future lease payments for operating and finance leases to
the operating and finance leases recorded in the consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2021:
Undiscounted Future Lease Payments
Operating Leases Finance Leases
2022 $ 4,605 $ 964
2023 3,821 21
2024 2,978 13
2025 1,669 8
2026 1,692 —
2027 and thereafter 9,949 —
Total lease payments 24,714 1,006
Less imputed interest (3,335) (5)
Total $ 21,379 $ 1,001
As of December 31, 2021, the Company did not have any significant additional operating or finance
leases that had not yet commenced.
4. INVESTMENTS
The following table summarizes the Company’s investments at:

Continuous Continuous
Gross Gross Unrealized Unrealized
Unrealized Unrealized Loss Position Loss Position
Amortized Holding Holding Fair less than 12 greater than 12
December 31, 2021 Cost Gains Losses Value Months Months

Available-for-sale
Short-term:

Commercial paper
Certificates of deposit
Municipal securities
U.S. government agency securities
U.S. treasuries
Long-term:
U.S. government agency securities
U.S. treasuries
Total
$ 334,077 $
44,502
666
62,687
1,308,536
— $



2
— $ 334,077 $ — $


26
717


26
717
44,502
666
62,661
1,307,821
12,500
87,133
$1,850,101 $


2 $
24
190
12,476
86,943
24
190
957 $
957 $1,849,146 $









MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
93

Continuous Continuous
Gross Gross Unrealized Unrealized
Unrealized Unrealized Loss Position Loss Position
Amortized Holding Holding Fair less than 12
Months
greater than 12
Months
December 31, 2020
Cost Gains Losses Value

Available-for-sale
Short-term:

Commercial paper
Certificates of deposit
Municipal securities
U.S. government agency securities
U.S. treasuries
Long-term:
U.S. government agency securities
U.S. treasuries
Total
$ 119,886 $
20,387
9,083
81,521
650,386
— $


13
150
— $ 119,886 $ — $


3
69


3
69
20,387
9,083
81,531
650,467
10,350
33,946
$ 925,559 $
1
1
165 $

7
10,351
33,940

7
79 $
79 $ 925,645 $









During the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, realized gains or losses recognized on the sale
of investments were not significant.
The Company’s investments at December 31, 2021 and 2020 carried investment grade credit ratings.
The following table summarizes the underlying contractual maturities of the Company’s investments at:
December 31, 2021 December 31, 2020

Amortized Cost Fair Value Amortized Cost Fair Value
Less than 1 year:
Commercial paper
$ 334,077 $ 334,077 119,886 $ 119,886
$
Municipal securities 666 666 9,083 9,083
U.S. government agency securities 62,687 62,661 81,521 81,531
Certificates of deposit 44,502 44,502 20,387 20,387
U.S. treasuries
Due 1 – 10 years:
U.S. treasuries
1,308,536 1,307,821 650,386 650,467
87,133 86,943 33,946 33,940
U.S. government agency securities 12,500 12,476 10,350 10,351
Total $ 1,850,101 $ 1,849,146 $ 925,559 $ 925,645

5. FAIR VALUE OF CERTAIN FINANCIAL ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
FASB ASC 820 provides a framework for measuring fair value and requires expanded disclosures regarding
fair value measurements. FASB ASC 820 defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or
paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. FASB
ASC 820 also establishes a fair value hierarchy which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs,
where available. The three levels of inputs required by the standard that the Company uses to measure fair value
are summarized below.
Level 1: Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2: Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities;
quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by
observable market data for substantially the full term of the related assets or liabilities.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
94
Level 3: Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to
the fair value of the assets or liabilities.
FASB ASC 820 requires the use of observable market inputs (quoted market prices) when measuring fair
value and requires a Level 1 quoted price to be used to measure fair value whenever possible.
The following tables present the fair value of Company’s financial assets and liabilities that are recorded at
fair value on a recurring basis, segregated among the appropriate levels within the fair value hierarchy at:
December 31, 2021 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Total

Cash
Money market funds
Certificates of deposit
Commercial paper
Municipal securities
U.S. government agency securities
U.S. treasuries
Foreign currency derivatives
Total
$ 749,089
440,826






$ 1,189,915
$

44,502
335,477
2,428
75,137
1,528,149
(278)
$







$ 749,089
440,826
44,502
335,477
2,428
75,137
1,528,149
(278)
$ 3,175,330
$ 1,985,415 $

Amounts included in:

Cash and cash equivalents
Short-term investments
Accounts receivable, net
Investments
Accrued liabilities
Total
$ 1,189,915




$ 1,189,915
$ 136,547
1,749,727
654
99,419
(932)
$




$ 1,326,462
1,749,727
654
99,419
(932)
$ 3,175,330
$ 1,985,415 $

December 31, 2020 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Total
Cash

$ 796,421
352,730






$ 1,149,151
$

23,137
130,883
9,083
91,882
701,922
(2,578)
$







$ 954,329 $

$ 796,421
Money market funds 352,730
Certificates of deposit 23,137
Commercial paper 130,883
Municipal securities 9,083
U.S. government agency securities 91,882
U.S. treasuries 701,922
Foreign currency derivatives (2,578)
Total $ 2,103,480
Amounts included in:
Cash and cash equivalents

$ 1,149,151
$ 31,262
881,354
$
69


$ 1,149,151
44,291
(2,647)
$ 954,329


$

$ 1,180,413
Short-term investments 881,354
Accounts receivable, net 69
Investments 44,291
Accrued liabilities (2,647)
Total $ 2,103,480

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
95
All of the Company’s short-term and long-term investments are classified within Level 1 or Level 2 of the
fair value hierarchy. The Company’s valuation of its Level 1 investments is based on quoted market prices in active
markets for identical securities. The Company’s valuation of its Level 2 investments is based on other observable
inputs, specifically a market approach which utilizes valuation models, pricing systems, mathematical tools and
other relevant information for the same or similar securities. The Company’s valuation of its Level 2 foreign
currency exchange contracts is based on quoted market prices of the same or similar instruments, adjusted for
counterparty risk. There were no transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 measurements during the years ended
December 31, 2021 and 2020, and there were no changes in the Company’s valuation techniques.
6. DERIVATIVE INSTRUMENTS AND HEDGING ACTIVITIES
The Company is exposed to foreign currency exchange rate risks related primarily to its foreign business
operations. During the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, the Company entered into forward currency
exchange contracts with financial institutions to create an economic hedge to specifically manage a portion of the
foreign exchange risk exposure associated with certain consolidated subsidiaries’ non-functional currency
denominated assets and liabilities. All foreign currency exchange contracts entered into by the Company that were
outstanding as of December 31, 2021 have terms of three months or less. The Company does not enter into forward
currency exchange contracts for speculation or trading purposes.
The Company has not designated its foreign currency exchange contracts as hedge transactions under FASB
ASC 815. Therefore, gains and losses on the Company’s foreign currency exchange contracts are recognized in
other income, net, in the consolidated statements of income, and are largely offset by the changes in the fair value
of the underlying economically hedged item.
The notional amount and fair value of all outstanding foreign currency derivative instruments in the
consolidated balance sheets consist of the following at:
December 31, 2021
Derivatives not designated as
hedging instruments under Notional Fair
FASB ASC 815-20 Amount Value Balance Sheet Location
Assets:
Foreign currency exchange contracts:
Receive SGD/pay USD $ 16,544 $ 297 Accounts receivable, net
Receive USD/pay COP 9,754 296 Accounts receivable, net
Receive RSD/pay USD 9,837 46 Accounts receivable, net
Receive USD/pay RUB 7,175 15 Accounts receivable, net
Liabilities:
Foreign currency exchange contracts:
Receive USD/pay GBP $ 29,929 $ (666) Accrued liabilities
Receive USD/pay AUD 2,602 (88) Accrued liabilities
Receive USD/pay CNY 12,230 (74) Accrued liabilities
Receive USD/pay NZD 2,693 (45) Accrued liabilities
Receive USD/pay EUR 3,045 (29) Accrued liabilities
Receive USD/pay ZAR 4,140 (21) Accrued liabilities
Receive USD/pay DKK 1,461 (9) Accrued liabilities

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
96
December 31, 2020
Derivatives not designated as
hedging instruments under Notional Fair
FASB ASC 815-20 Amount Value Balance Sheet Location
Assets:
Foreign currency exchange contracts:

Receive SGD/pay USD $ 18,713 $ 41 Accounts receivable, net
Receive RSD/pay USD 10,127 28 Accounts receivable, net

Liabilities:
Foreign currency exchange contracts:

Receive EUR/pay USD
Receive USD/pay GBP
Receive USD/pay AUD
Receive USD/pay ZAR
Receive USD/pay COP
Receive USD/pay CNY
Receive USD/pay RUB
Receive NOK/pay USD
Receive USD/pay NZD
Receive SEK/pay USD
Receive USD/pay DKK
$ 1,298,899
35,256
8,508
2,403
5,436
12,344
7,780
4,411
2,290
2,275
3,151
$ (1,768) Accrued liabilities
(416) Accrued liabilities
(130) Accrued liabilities
(106) Accrued liabilities
(93) Accrued liabilities
(50) Accrued liabilities
(40) Accrued liabilities
(18) Accrued liabilities
(13) Accrued liabilities
(10) Accrued liabilities
(3) Accrued liabilities

The net gain (loss) on derivative instruments in the consolidated statements of income was as follows:
Amount of gain (loss)
recognized in income on
derivatives
Derivatives not designated as Location of gain (loss) Year ended
hedging instruments under recognized in income on December 31, December 31, December 31,
FASB ASC 815-20 derivatives 2021 2020 2019
Foreign currency exchange contracts Other income (expense), net $ (5,445) $ (3,317) $ (2,555)
7. INVENTORIES
Inventories consist of the following at December 31:
2021 2020
Raw materials

$ 349,865
243,492
$ 593,357
$ 155,166
177,919
$ 333,085

Finished goods
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
97
8. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, Net
Property and equipment consist of the following at December 31:
2021 2020

Land $ 85,455 $ 85,876
Leasehold improvements 11,845 11,524
Furniture and fixtures 8,274 8,271
Office and computer equipment 21,601 21,657
Computer software 8,383 6,945
Equipment 190,333 185,348
Buildings 167,243 156,616
Vehicles 45,404 43,173
538,538
(224,785)
519,410
(204,754)
Less: accumulated depreciation and amortization
$ 313,753 $ 314,656

Total depreciation and amortization expense recorded was $45.7 million, $49.3 million and $49.1 million
for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
9. GOODWILL AND OTHER INTANGIBLE ASSETS
The following is a roll-forward of goodwill for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 by reportable
segment:
Monster

Energy® Strategic
Drinks Brands Other Total

Balance at December 31, 2020

$ 693,644

$ 693,644
$ 637,999

$ 637,999
$ —

$ —
$ 1,331,643

$ 1,331,643

Acquisitions Balance at December 31, 2021 Monster

Energy® Strategic
Drinks Brands Other Total

Balance at December 31, 2019

$ 693,644

$ 693,644
$ 637,999

$ 637,999
$ —

$ —
$ 1,331,643

$ 1,331,643

Acquisitions Balance at December 31, 2020 Intangible assets consist of the following at:
December 31, December 31,
2021 2020
Amortizing intangibles

$ 66,872
(61,227)
5,645
$ 66,875
(56,801)
10,074
1,066,741 1,048,972
$ 1,072,386 $ 1,059,046

Accumulated amortization Non-amortizing intangibles
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
98
Amortizing intangibles primarily consist of customer relationships. All amortizing intangibles have been
assigned an estimated finite useful life and such intangibles are amortized on a straight-line basis over the number
of years that approximate their respective useful lives, generally five to seven years. Total amortization expense
recorded was $4.4 million, $7.7 million and $11.6 million for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019,
respectively. No impairment was recorded for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2019. Total impairment
recorded was $8.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2020.
The following is the future estimated amortization expense related to amortizing intangibles as of December
31, 2021:
Year Ending December 31:
2022 $ 4,405
2023 1,112
2024 14
2025 13
2026 13
2027 and thereafter 88
$ 5,645
At December 31, 2021, non-amortizing intangibles primarily consist of indefinite-lived tradenames, flavors
and formulas.
10. DISTRIBUTION AGREEMENTS
In accordance with FASB ASC 420 “Exit or Disposal Cost Obligations”, the Company expenses distributor
termination costs in the period in which the written notification of termination occurs. As a result, the Company
incurred termination costs of $5.3 million, $0.2 million and $11.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2021,
2020 and 2019, respectively. Such termination costs have been expensed in full and are included in operating
expenses in the consolidated statements of income for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019.
In the normal course of business, amounts received pursuant to new and/or amended distribution
agreements entered into with certain bottlers/distributors, relating to the costs associated with terminating
agreements with the Company’s prior distributors, are accounted for as deferred revenue and are recognized as
revenue ratably over the anticipated life of the respective distribution agreement, generally 20 years. Revenue
recognized was $21.5 million, $21.4 million and $25.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and
2019, respectively.
11. DEBT
The Company entered into a credit facility with Comerica Bank (“Comerica”) consisting of a revolving line
of credit, which was amended in April 2020, under which the Company may borrow up to $10.0 million of noncollateralized debt. The revolving line of credit is effective through June 1, 2025. Interest on borrowings under the
line of credit is based on Comerica’s base (prime) rate minus 1.00% to 1.50%, or London Interbank Offered Rates
plus an additional percentage of 1.25% to 1.75%, depending upon certain financial ratios maintained by the
Company. The Company had no outstanding borrowings on this line of credit at December 31, 2021. Under this
revolving line of credit, the Company may also issue standby Letters of Credit with an aggregate amount of up to
$4.0 million. The fee on the standby Letters of Credit ranges from 1.00% to 1.50% depending upon certain financial
ratios maintained by the Company. The Company had no outstanding standby Letters of Credit at December 31,
2021.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
99
The Company has a credit facility with HSBC Bank (China) Company Limited, Shanghai Branch, of $15.0
million. At December 31, 2021, the interest rate on borrowings under the line of credit was 5.5%. As of December
31, 2021, $5.8 million was outstanding on this line of credit.
12. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Contractual Obligations – The Company had the following contractual obligations related primarily to
sponsorships, other marketing activities and AFF new production facility construction costs as of December 31,
2021:
Year Ending December 31:
2022 $ 236,698
2023 57,848
2024 10,497
2025 10
2026 —
2027 and thereafter —
$ 305,053
Purchase Commitments – The Company had purchase commitments aggregating approximately $273.4
million at December 31, 2021, which represent commitments made by the Company and its subsidiaries to various
suppliers of raw materials for the production of its products. These obligations vary in terms, but are generally
satisfied within one year.
The Company purchases various raw material items, including, but not limited to, flavors, ingredients,
supplement ingredients, containers, milk, glucose, sucralose, cream and protein, from a limited number of suppliers.
An interruption in supply from any of such resources could result in the Company’s inability to produce certain
products for limited or possibly extended periods of time. The aggregate value of purchases from suppliers of such
limited resources described above for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 was $698.0 million,
$401.8 million and $335.3 million, respectively.
Guarantees – The Company from time to time enters into certain types of contracts that contingently require
the Company to indemnify parties against third-party claims. These contracts primarily relate to: (i) certain
agreements with the Company’s officers, directors and employees under which the Company may be required to
indemnify such persons for liabilities arising out of their employment relationship, (ii) certain distribution or
purchase agreements under which the Company may have to indemnify the Company’s customers from any claim,
liability or loss arising out of any actual or alleged injury or damages suffered in connection with the consumption
or purchase of the Company’s products or the use of Company trademarks, and (iii) certain real estate leases, under
which the Company may be required to indemnify property owners for liabilities and other claims arising from the
Company’s use of the applicable premises. The terms of such obligations vary and typically, a maximum obligation
is not explicitly stated. Generally, the Company believes that its insurance coverage is adequate to cover any
resulting liabilities or claims.
Litigation – From time to time in the normal course of business, the Company is named in litigation,
including labor and employment matters, personal injury matters, consumer class actions, intellectual property
matters and claims from prior distributors. Although it is not possible to predict the ultimate outcome of such
litigation, based on the facts known to the Company, management believes that such litigation in aggregate will
likely not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial position or results of operations.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
100
The Company evaluates, on a quarterly basis, developments in legal proceedings and other matters that
could cause an increase or decrease in the amount of the liability that is accrued, if any, and any related insurance
reimbursements. As of December 31, 2021, no loss contingencies were included in the Company’s consolidated
balance sheet.
13. ACCUMULATED OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
The components of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) are as follows at December 31:
2021 2020

Accumulated net unrealized (loss) gain on available-for-sale securities
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of tax
Total accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income
$ (956) $
(68,209)
84
2,950
$ (69,165) $ 3,034

14. TREASURY STOCK PURCHASE
On March 13, 2020, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized a new share repurchase program for the
purchase of up to $500.0 million of the Company’s outstanding common stock (the “March 2020 Repurchase
Plan”). During the year ended December 31, 2021, no shares were purchased under the March 2020 Repurchase
Plan. As of February 28, 2022, $441.5 million remained available for repurchase under the March 2020 Repurchase
Plan.
During the year ended December 31, 2021, 0.2 million shares of common stock were purchased from
employees in lieu of cash payments for options exercised or withholding taxes due for a total amount of $13.8
million. While such purchases are considered common stock repurchases, they are not counted as purchases against
the Company’s authorized share repurchase programs. Such shares are included in common stock in treasury in the
accompanying consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2021.
15. STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION
The Company has two stock-based compensation plans under which shares were available for grant at
December 31, 2021: (i) the Monster Beverage Corporation 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan (the “2020 Omnibus
Incentive Plan”), which includes the Monster Beverage Corporation Deferred Compensation Plan as a sub plan
thereunder, and (ii) the Monster Beverage Corporation 2017 Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors,
which includes the Monster Beverage Corporation Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors as a
sub plan thereunder. The 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan was approved by the Board of Directors on April 14, 2020
and approved by the stockholders of the Company at the annual meeting of the Company’s stockholders held on
June 3, 2020 (the “Effective Date”). The 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan replaced the Monster Beverage Corporation
2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan (the “2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan”).
The 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan provides for the granting of stock options, stock appreciation rights,
restricted stock, restricted stock units, performance awards, and other share-based awards up to an aggregate of
46,169,367 shares of the Company’s common stock, comprised of 32,000,000 new shares of common stock
reserved under the 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan, which were authorized on the Effective Date, and 14,169,367
shares of common stock that were available for grant under the 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan as of December 31,
2019 and prior to the Effective Date. Shares authorized under the 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan are reduced by one
(1) share for options or stock appreciation rights granted under the 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan and for any grants
after December 31, 2019 under the 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan, and by 2.6 shares for each share granted or issued
with respect to a Full Value Award under either the 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan or for any shares granted after

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
101
December 31, 2019 under the 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan. A “Full Value Award” is an award other than an
incentive stock option, a non-qualified stock option, or a stock appreciation right, which is settled by the issuance
of shares. Options granted under the 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan may be incentive stock options under Section
422 of the Internal Revenue Code, as amended (the “Code”), or non-qualified stock options.
Shares previously granted under the 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan after December 31, 2019 and prior to
the Effective Date of the 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan reduced the number of shares available for grant under the
2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan. As of December 31, 2021, 2,755,257 shares of the Company’s common stock have
been granted, net of cancellations, and 42,513,457 shares (as adjusted for Full Value Awards) of the Company’s
common stock remain available for grant under the 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan.
The Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors (the “Compensation Committee”) has sole and
exclusive authority to grant stock awards to all employees who are not new hires and to all new hires who are
subject to Section 16 of the Exchange Act (“Section 16”). Each of the Compensation Committee and the Executive
Committee of the Board of Directors (the “Executive Committee”) independently has the authority to grant stock
awards to (i) new hires and (ii) employees receiving a promotion, in each case, who are not Section 16 employees.
Awards granted by the Executive Committee are not subject to approval or ratification by the Board of Directors or
the Compensation Committee. Options granted under the 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan generally vest over a threeto five-year period from the grant date and are generally exercisable up to 10 years after the grant date. Restricted
stock units granted under the 2020 Omnibus Incentive Plan generally vest over a three- or five-year period from the
grant date. Performance share units will generally vest based on the achievement of performance goals specified
for the applicable award.
In 2016, the Company adopted the Deferred Compensation Plan (as a sub plan to the 2011 Omnibus
Incentive Plan), pursuant to which eligible employees may elect to defer cash and/or equity based compensation
and to receive the deferred amounts, together with an investment return (positive or negative), either at a predetermined time in the future or upon termination of their employment with the Company or its subsidiaries or
affiliates that are participating employers under the Deferred Compensation Plan, as provided under the Deferred
Compensation Plan and in relevant deferral elections. Deferrals under the Deferred Compensation Plan are
unfunded and unsecured. As of December 31, 2021 deferrals under the Deferred Compensation Plan are solely
comprised of cash compensation and equity compensation and are not material in the aggregate.
In 2017, the Company adopted the 2017 Directors Plan, a successor plan to the 2009 Monster Beverage
Corporation Stock Incentive Plan for Non-Employee Directors. The 2017 Directors Plan permits the granting of
stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted shares or restricted stock units, deferred awards, dividend
equivalents, and other share based-awards up to an aggregate of 1,250,000 shares of common stock of the Company
to non-employee directors of the Company.
Each calendar year, a non-employee director will receive an annual retainer and annual equity award, as
provided for in the 2017 Directors Plan, which may be modified from time to time. Currently, with respect to equity
awards, each non-employee director receives an award of restricted stock units at each annual meeting of the
Company’s stockholders or promptly thereafter. A non-employee director’s annual award of restricted stock units
will generally vest on the earliest to occur of: (a) the last business day immediately preceding the annual meeting
of the Company’s stockholders in the calendar year following the calendar year in which the grant date occurs, (b)
a Change of Control (as defined in the 2017 Directors Plan), (c) the non-employee director’s death, or (d) the date
of the non-employee director’s separation from service due to disability, so long as the non-employee director
remains a non-employee director through such date. The Board of Directors may in its discretion award nonemployee directors stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock and other share-based awards in lieu of
or in addition to restricted stock units. The Board of Directors may amend or terminate the 2017 Directors Plan at
any time, subject to certain limitations set forth in the 2017 Directors Plan. As of December 31, 2021, 98,901 shares

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
102
of the Company’s common stock had been granted under the 2017 Directors Plan, and 1,151,099 shares of the
Company’s common stock remain available for grant.
In 2017, the Company adopted the Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors (as a sub plan
to the 2017 Directors Plan), pursuant to which the Board of Directors may permit non-employee directors to elect,
at such times and in accordance with rules and procedures (or sub-plan) adopted by the Board of Directors (which
are intended to comply with Section 409A of the Code, as applicable), to receive all or any portion of such nonemployee director’s compensation, whether payable in cash or in equity, on a deferred basis. Deferrals under the
Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors are unfunded and unsecured. As of December 31, 2021,
deferrals under the Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors are solely comprised of cash
compensation and equity compensation and are not material in the aggregate. The 2017 Directors Plan was adopted
to effectuate any such deferrals. The 2017 Directors Plan is administered by the Board of Directors. Each award
granted under the 2017 Directors Plan will be evidenced by a written agreement and will contain the terms and
conditions that the Board of Directors deems appropriate.
In February 2022, the Board of Directors amended and restated the 2017 Directors Plan to require each
non-employee director to satisfy the share ownership guidelines set forth below, as may be modified by the Board
of Directors from time to time. The current share ownership guidelines provide that non-employee directors of the
Company must:
Hold shares of Company common stock having a total value of five times the annual retainer payable to a
non-employee director (excluding any portion of the annual retainer attributable to a non-employee
director’s service as a member of a subcommittee, as a chair of a subcommittee or as the lead independent
director, as applicable). For this purpose, deferred shares or deferred restricted stock units will be deemed
held, to the extent vested.
The minimum stock ownership level must be achieved by each non-employee director by the fifth
anniversary of such non-employee director’s initial appointment to the Board of Directors.
Once achieved, ownership of the guideline amount should be maintained for so long as the non-employee
director retains his or her seat on the Board of Directors.
There may be rare instances where these guidelines would place a hardship on a non-employee director. In
these cases or in similar circumstances, the Board of Directors will make the final decision as to developing
an alternative stock ownership guideline for a non-employee director that reflects the intention of these
guidelines and his or her personal circumstances.
The Company recorded $70.5 million, $70.3 million and $63.4 million of compensation expense relating
to outstanding options, restricted stock units, performance share units and other share-based awards during the years
ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
The tax benefit for tax deductions from non-qualified stock option exercises, disqualifying dispositions of
incentive stock options and vesting of restricted stock units and performance share units for the years ended
December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 was $6.8 million, $10.5 million and $25.9 million, respectively.
Stock Options
Under the Company’s stock-based compensation plans, all stock options granted through December 31,
2021 were granted at prices based on the fair value of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant. The
Company records compensation expense for employee stock options based on the estimated fair value of the options
on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing formula with the assumptions included in the
table below. The Company records compensation expense for non-employee stock options based on the estimated
fair value of the options as of the earlier of (1) the date at which a commitment for performance by the non-employee

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
103
to earn the stock option is reached or (2) the date at which the non-employee’s performance is complete, using the
Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing formula with the assumptions included in the table below. The Company uses
historical data to determine the exercise behavior, volatility and forfeiture rate of the options.
The following weighted-average assumptions were used to estimate the fair value of options granted during:
2021 2020 2019

Dividend yield
Expected volatility
Risk-free interest rate
Expected term
0.0 %
28.9 %
0.85 %
5.8 Years
0.0 %
30.4 %
0.70 %
5.8 Years
0.0 %
30.2 %
2.37 %
6.0 Years

Expected Volatility: The Company uses historical volatility as it provides a reasonable estimate of the
expected volatility. Historical volatility is based on the most recent volatility of the stock price over a period of time
equivalent to the expected term of the option.
Risk-Free Interest Rate: The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. treasury zero coupon yield curve in
effect at the time of grant for the expected term of the option.
Expected Term: The Company’s expected term represents the weighted-average period that the Company’s
stock options are expected to be outstanding. The expected term is based on expected time to post-vesting exercise
of options by employees. The Company uses historical exercise patterns of previously granted options to derive
employee behavioral patterns used to forecast expected exercise patterns.
The following table summarizes the Company’s activities with respect to its stock option plans as follows:
WeightedWeighted- Average

Average Remaining
Number of Exercise Contractual Aggregate
Shares Price Per Term (in Intrinsic
Options (in thousands) Share years) Value

Outstanding at January 1, 2021 13,973 $ 44.93 5.7 $ 664,432
Granted 01/01/21 – 03/31/21 1,015 $ 88.95
Granted 04/01/21 – 06/30/21 13 $ 91.36
Granted 07/01/21 – 09/30/21 23 $ 95.33
Granted 10/01/21 – 12/31/21 12 $ 87.00
Exercised (1,037) $ 44.10
Cancelled or forfeited (139) $ 63.05
Outstanding at December 31, 2021 13,860 $ 48.19 5.1 $ 663,148
Vested and expected to vest in the future at
December 31, 2021 13,633 $ 47.80 5.0 $ 657,633
Exercisable at December 31, 2021 9,644 $ 40.33 4.0 $ 537,261

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
104
The following table summarizes information about stock options outstanding and exercisable at December
31, 2021:
Options Outstanding Options Exercisable
Weighted Average
Remaining

Weighted Number
Average Exercisable
Exercise
Price ($)
(In
Thousands)

Weighted

Number Contractual
Outstanding
(In Thousands)
Term
(Years)

Average
Range of Exercise Exercise
Prices ($) Price ($)
$ 15.71 – $ 17.99 1,395 1.4 $ 17.77 1,395 $ 17.77
$ 18.64 – $ 23.35 1,562 2.1 $ 23.08 1,562 $ 23.08
$ 36.05 – $ 36.05 9 3.0 $ 36.05 9 $ 36.05
$ 37.10 – $ 43.99 2,280 4.3 $ 43.47 2,272 $ 43.47
$ 44.73 – $ 45.16 1,410 3.4 $ 45.10 1,410 $ 45.10
$ 45.55 – $ 54.45 1,491 5.5 $ 48.21 1,058 $ 47.43
$ 55.14 – $ 57.95 153 7.1 $ 56.90 36 $ 56.57
$ 58.73 – $ 58.73 2,054 6.2 $ 58.73 1,084 $ 58.73
$ 58.77 – $ 58.77 4 6.6 $ 58.77 2 $ 58.77
$ 59.67 – $ 97.80 3,502 8.1 $ 69.29 816 $ 60.56
13,860 5.1 $ 48.19 9,644 $ 40.33
The weighted-average grant-date fair value of options granted during the years ended December 31, 2021,
2020 and 2019 was $25.80 per share, $18.82 per share and $20.17 per share, respectively. The total intrinsic value
of options exercised during the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 was $51.2 million, $68.8 million
and $220.2 million, respectively.
Cash received from option exercises under all plans for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
was $45.7 million, $72.9 million and $92.4 million, respectively.
At December 31, 2021, there was $51.3 million of total unrecognized compensation expense related to nonvested options granted to employees under the Company’s share-based payment plans. That cost is expected to be
recognized over a weighted-average period of 2.1 years.
Restricted Stock Units and Performance Share Units
The cost of stock-based compensation for restricted stock units and performance share units is measured
based on the closing fair market value of the Company’s common stock at the date of grant. In the event that the
Company has the option and intent to settle a restricted stock unit or performance share unit in cash, the award is
classified as a liability and revalued at each balance sheet date.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
105
The following table summarizes the Company’s activities with respect to non-vested restricted stock units
and performance share units as follows:
Weighted

Number of
Shares (in
thousands)
947
304
14
1
1
Average
Grant-Date
Fair Value
Non-vested at January 1, 2021
Granted 01/01/21 – 03/31/21
1
Granted 04/01/21 – 06/30/21
Granted 07/01/21 – 09/30/21
Granted 10/01/21 – 12/31/21
Vested
Forfeited/cancelled
Non-vested at December 31, 2021
$
$
$
$
$
60.52
86.28
92.14
89.84
89.95
62.29
60.41
69.02
(344) $
(13) $
910 $

1The grant activity for performance share units is recorded based on the target performance level earning 100% of target
performance share units. The actual number of performance share units earned could range from 0% to 200% of target dependent on the
pre-established performance goals.
The weighted-average grant-date fair value of restricted stock units and/or performance share units granted
during the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 was $89.12, $62.97 and $59.79 per share, respectively.
As of December 31, 2021, 0.8 million of restricted stock units and performance share units are expected to vest.
At December 31, 2021, total unrecognized compensation expense relating to non-vested restricted stock
units and performance share units was $34.8 million, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average
period of 1.9 years.
Other Share-Based Awards
The Company has granted other share-based awards to certain employees that are payable in cash. These
awards are classified as liabilities and are valued based on the fair value of the award at the grant date and are
remeasured at each reporting date until settlement with compensation expense being recognized in proportion to
the completed requisite service period up until date of settlement. At December 31, 2021, other share-based awards
outstanding included grants that vest over three years payable in the first quarters of 2022, 2023 and 2024.
At December 31, 2021, there was $0.7 million of total unrecognized compensation expense related to
nonvested other share-based awards granted to employees under the Company’s stock-based compensation plans.
That cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1.0 years.
Employee and Non-Employee Share-Based Compensation Expense
The table below shows the amounts recognized in the consolidated financial statements for the years ended
December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 for share-based compensation related to employees and non-employees.
Employee and non-employee share-based compensation expense of $70.5 million for the year ended December 31,
2021 is comprised of $8.3 million relating to incentive stock options, $1.6 million relating to other share-based
awards and $60.6 million relating to non-qualified stock options, restricted units and performance units. Employee
and non-employee share-based compensation expense of $70.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 is
comprised of $9.4 million relating to incentive stock options, $2.7 million relating to other share-based awards and
$58.2 million relating to non-qualified stock options, restricted units and performance units. Employee and nonemployee share-based compensation expense of $63.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 is comprised
of $10.0 million relating to incentive stock options and $53.4 million relating to non-qualified stock options and
restricted units.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
106
2021 2020 2019

Operating expenses
Total employee and non-employee share-based compensation expense
included in income, before income tax
Less: Amount of income tax benefit recognized in earnings
Amount charged against net income
$ 70,483 $ 70,289 $ 63,356
70,483
(14,228)
$ 56,255
70,289
(15,499)
$ 54,790
63,356
(36,326)
$ 27,030

16. INCOME TAXES
The Company evaluated the various provisions of the Tax Reform Act, including, the global intangible
low-taxed income (“GILTI”) and the foreign derived intangible income provisions. The Company will treat any
U.S. tax on foreign earnings under GILTI as a current period expense when incurred.
The Company currently considers the earnings of its foreign entities (excluding Japan) to be permanently
reinvested outside the United States based on estimates that future domestic cash generation will be sufficient to
meet future domestic cash needs. Accordingly, deferred income taxes have not been recorded for the undistributed
earnings of the Company’s foreign subsidiaries excluding Japan. Deferred income taxes have not been recorded for
Japan, as any federal, state, or foreign withholding taxes associated with the repatriation of those earnings would
be immaterial.
The domestic and foreign components of the Company’s income before provision for income taxes are as
follows:
Year Ended December 31,

2021
$ 1,431,797
369,622
$ 1,801,419
2020
$ 1,374,402
251,755
$ 1,626,157
2019
$ 1,196,883
219,079
$ 1,415,962
Domestic*
Foreign*
Income before provision for income taxes

*After intercompany royalties, management fees and interest charges from the Company’s domestic to foreign entities of $61.1 million, $54.2
million and $51.2 million for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Components of the provision for income taxes are as follows:
Year Ended December 31,

2021 2020 2019
Current:
Federal
State
$ 273,115
44,990
$ 259,073
43,704
$ 212,068
39,982
Foreign 89,410 70,658 55,167
407,515 373,435 307,217
Deferred:
Federal
14,750 11,401 8,320
State 4,689 4,709 (6,878)
Foreign 5,092 (167,595) (4,219)
24,531
(8,102)
$ 423,944
(151,485)
(5,387)
$ 216,563
(2,777)
3,687
$ 308,127
Valuation allowance

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
107
A reconciliation of the total provision for income taxes after applying the U.S. federal statutory rate of
21% to income before provision for income taxes to the reported provision for income taxes are as follows for the
years ended:
Year Ended December 31,
2021 2020 2019

U.S. Federal tax expense at statutory rates
State income taxes, net of federal tax benefit
Permanent differences
Stock based compensation
Intra-company transfer benefit
Other
Foreign rate differential
Valuation allowance
$ 378,298
38,894
(4,168)
2,790

(649)
16,881
(8,102)
$ 423,944
$ 341,493
37,478
(1,064)
1,097
(165,075)
(7,388)
15,409
(5,387)
$ 216,563
$ 297,352
30,098
(2,128)
(13,473)

(12,423)
5,014
3,687
$ 308,127

Major components of the Company’s deferred tax assets (liabilities) at December 31, 2021 and 2020 are as
follows:

2021 2020 Deferred Tax Assets:
Reserve for sales returns
Reserve for inventory obsolescence
Reserve for marketing development fund
Capitalization of inventory costs
State franchise tax – current
Accrued compensation
Accrued other liabilities
Deferred revenue
Stock-based compensation
Foreign net operating loss carryforward
Prepaid supplies
Termination payments
Operating lease liabilities
Intangibles
Impairment-trademarks and others
Other deferred tax assets
Total gross deferred tax assets
Deferred Tax Liabilities:
Amortization of trademarks
State franchise tax – deferred
Operating lease ROU assets
Other deferred tax liabilities
Depreciation
Total gross deferred tax liabilities
Valuation Allowance
$ 889
3,643
8,951
2,533
2,493
2,854
4,634
68,557
24,635
14,507
6,317
58,042
4,711
72,666
2,047
33,013
$ 275
2,366
9,629
3,365
4,229
1,284
7,464
75,592
23,370
21,626
5,551
63,009
4,434
87,687
2,055
27,164
$ 310,492 $ 339,100
$ (41,517) $ (42,161)
(5,505)
(4,711)
(618)
(5,907)
(58,258)
(27,013)
(6,318)
(4,434)
(58)
(9,363)
(62,334)
(35,116)
Net deferred tax assets $ 225,221 $ 241,650

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
108
During the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, the Company established full valuation
allowances against certain deferred tax assets, resulting from cumulative net operating losses incurred by certain
foreign subsidiaries of the Company. The effect of the valuation allowances and the subsequent related impact on
the Company’s overall tax rate was to decrease the Company’s provision for income taxes by $8.1 million and $5.4
million for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and increase the Company’s provision for
income taxes $3.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. At December 31, 2021, the Company had net
operating loss carryforwards of approximately $60.5 million. Of this amount, $35.2 million may be carried forward
indefinitely. The remaining $25.3 million of net operating loss carryforwards will begin to expire in 2022.
In October 2020, the Company completed an intra-entity transfer of intangible assets between certain of the
Company’s foreign subsidiaries to better align its international structure with its expanding operations. The transfer
resulted in a step-up of the tax-deductible basis in the transferred assets in a foreign jurisdiction, and created a
temporary difference between the tax basis and book basis for such intangible assets. The Company recognized
deferred tax assets of approximately $165.1 million, with a corresponding reduction to the provision for income
taxes during the fourth quarter of 2020 in its consolidated financial statements. The tax deductions for the
amortization of the deferred tax assets will be recognized in the future and any amortization not deducted for tax
purposes will be carried forward indefinitely. The tax impact on the foreign subsidiary transferor was not material.
The following is a roll-forward of the Company’s total gross unrecognized tax benefits, not including
interest and penalties, for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019:
Gross Unrecognized Tax
Benefits

Balance at December 31, 2018
Additions for tax positions related to the current year
Additions for tax positions related to the prior year
Decreases for tax positions related to prior years
Balance at December 31, 2019
$ 5,035

1,833
(3,875)
2,993
$

Additions for tax positions related to the current year —
Additions for tax positions related to the prior year —
Decreases for tax positions related to prior years (2,251)
Balance at December 31, 2020 $ 742

Additions for tax positions related to the current year
Additions for tax positions related to the prior year
Decreases for tax positions related to prior years
Balance at December 31, 2021


(742)
$

The Company recognizes accrued interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits in the provision
for income taxes in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. As of December 31, 2021, the Company had
no unrecognized tax benefits.
It is expected that any change in the amount of unrecognized tax benefit change within the next 12 months
will not be significant.
The Company is subject to U.S. federal income tax as well as to income tax in multiple state and foreign
jurisdictions.
The Company is in various stages of examination with certain states and certain foreign jurisdictions,
including the United Kingdom and Ireland. The Company’s 2018 through 2020 U.S. federal income tax returns are

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
109
subject to examination by the IRS. The Company’s state income tax returns are subject to examination for the 2017
through 2020 tax years.
17. EARNINGS PER SHARE
A reconciliation of the weighted average shares used in the basic and diluted earnings per common share
computations for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 is presented below (in thousands):
2021 2020 2019
Weighted-average shares outstanding:

Basic 528,763 529,639 542,191
Dilutive securities 6,876 5,168 4,417
Diluted 535,639 534,807 546,608

For the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, options and awards outstanding totaling 0.8 million
shares, 1.8 million shares and 4.4 million shares, respectively, were excluded from the calculations as their effect
would have been antidilutive.
18. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLAN
Employees of the Company may participate in the Monster Beverage Corporation 401(k) Plan, a defined
contribution plan, which qualifies under Section 401(k) of the Internal Revenue Code. Participating employees may
contribute into a traditional plan with pretax salary or into a Roth plan with after tax salary up to statutory limits.
The Company contributes 50% of the employee contribution, up to 8% of each employee’s earnings, which vest
over four years (2 years of service = 50%, 3 years of service = 75%, 4 years of service = 100%). Matching
contributions were $5.5 million, $4.7 million and $3.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and
2019, respectively.
19. SEGMENT INFORMATION
The Company has three operating and reportable segments: (i) Monster Energy® Drinks segment, which
is primarily comprised of the Company’s Monster Energy® drinks, Reign Total Body Fuel® high performance
energy drinks and True North® Pure Energy Seltzers, (ii) Strategic Brands segment, which is primarily comprised
of the various energy drink brands acquired from TCCC in 2015 as well as the Company’s affordable energy brands,
and (iii) Other segment, which is comprised of the AFF Third-Party Products.
The Company’s Monster Energy® Drinks segment primarily generates net operating revenues by selling
ready-to-drink packaged drinks primarily to bottlers/distributors. In some cases, the Company sells ready-to-drink
packaged drinks directly to retail grocery and specialty chains, wholesalers, club stores, mass merchandisers,
convenience chains, drug stores, foodservice customers, value stores, e-commerce retailers and the military.
The Company’s Strategic Brands segment primarily generates net operating revenues by selling
“concentrates” and/or “beverage bases” to authorized bottling and canning operations. Such bottlers generally
combine the concentrates and/or beverage bases with sweeteners, water and other ingredients to produce ready-todrink packaged energy drinks. The ready-to-drink packaged energy drinks are then sold by such bottlers to other
bottlers/distributors and to retail grocery and specialty chains, wholesalers, club stores, mass merchandisers,
convenience chains, foodservice customers, drug stores, value stores, e-commerce retailers and the military. To a
lesser extent, the Strategic Brands segment generates net operating revenues by selling certain ready-to-drink
packaged energy drinks to bottlers/distributors.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
110
Generally, the Monster Energy® Drinks segment generates higher per case net operating revenues, but
lower per case gross profit margin percentages than the Strategic Brands segment.
Corporate and unallocated amounts that do not relate to a reportable segment have been allocated to
“Corporate & Unallocated.” No asset information, other than goodwill and other intangible assets, has been
provided in the Company’s reportable segments, as management does not measure or allocate such assets on a
segment basis.
The net revenues derived from the Company’s reportable segments and other financial information related
thereto for the years ended December 31 are as follows:
2021 2020 2019
Net sales:
Monster Energy® Drinks⁽¹⁾

$ 5,220,673
294,762
$ 4,305,246
266,354
$ 3,904,029
274,925
25,917

$ 5,541,352
27,038

$ 4,598,638
21,865

$ 4,200,819

Strategic Brands Other Corporate and unallocated 2021 2020 2019
Operating Income:
Monster Energy® Drinks⁽¹⁾

$ 1,990,785
173,660
$ 1,820,346
155,047
$ 1,565,977
164,053
6,935
(373,913)
$ 1,797,467
5,930
(348,170)
$ 1,633,153
3,650
(330,741)
$ 1,402,939

Strategic Brands Other Corporate and unallocated 2021 2020 2019
Income before tax:

Monster Energy® Drinks⁽¹⁾
Strategic Brands
$ 1,992,185
173,739
$ 1,820,625
155,047
$ 1,567,022
164,049
Other
Corporate and unallocated
6,935
(371,440)
$ 1,801,419
5,933
(355,448)
$ 1,626,157
3,655
(318,764)
$ 1,415,962

(1) Includes $41.5 million, $42.1 million and $46.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively,
related to the recognition of deferred revenue.
2021 2020 2019
Depreciation and amortization:
Monster Energy® Drinks

$ 34,532 $ 38,277 $ 39,397
1,085 4,178 7,935
4,485 4,631 4,637
10,053 9,944 8,758
$ 50,155 $ 57,030 $ 60,727

Strategic Brands Other Corporate and unallocated
MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
111
Corporate and unallocated expenses were $373.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2021 and
included $258.6 million of payroll costs, of which $70.3 million was attributable to stock-based compensation
expense (See Note 15, “Stock-Based Compensation”), $77.9 million of professional service expenses, including
accounting and legal costs, $9.3 million of insurance costs and $28.1 million of other operating expenses.
Corporate and unallocated expenses were $348.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 and
included $234.1 million of payroll costs, of which $69.9 million was attributable to stock-based compensation
expense (See Note 15, “Stock-Based Compensation”), $67.6 million of professional service expenses, including
accounting and legal costs, $7.5 million of insurance costs and $39.0 million of other operating expenses.
Corporate and unallocated expenses were $330.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 and
included $203.3 million of payroll costs, of which $63.4 million was attributable to stock-based compensation
expense (See Note 15, “Stock-Based Compensation”), $78.5 million of professional service expenses, including
accounting and legal costs, $6.1 million of insurance costs and $42.8 million of other operating expenses.
Coca-Cola Consolidated, Inc. accounted for approximately 12%, 12% and 13% of the Company’s net sales
for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Reyes Coca-Cola Bottling, LLC accounted for approximately 10%, 11% and 11% of the Company’s net
sales for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Coca-Cola Europacific Partners accounted for approximately 12%, 10% and 10% of the Company’s net
sales for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Net sales to customers outside the United States amounted to $2.04 billion, $1.51 billion and $1.33 billion
for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Such sales were approximately 37%, 33%
and 32% of net sales for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Goodwill and other intangible assets for the Company’s reportable segments as of December 31, 2021 and
2020 are as follows:
2021 2020
Goodwill and other intangible assets:
Monster Energy® Drinks

$ 1,420,503
978,032
$ 1,406,646
974,132
5,494

$ 2,404,029
9,911

$ 2,390,689

Strategic Brands Other Corporate and unallocated 20. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS
TCCC controls approximately 19.3% of the voting interests of the Company. The TCCC Subsidiaries, the
TCCC Related Parties and certain TCCC independent bottlers, purchase and distribute the Company’s products in
domestic and certain international markets. The Company also pays TCCC a commission based on certain sales
within the TCCC distribution network.
TCCC commissions, based on sales to the TCCC Subsidiaries and the TCCC Related Parties, for the year
ended December 31, 2021 were $77.5 million, and are included as a reduction to net sales. TCCC commissions,
based on sales to the TCCC Independent Bottlers for the year ended December 31, 2021 were $28.7 million, and
are included in operating expenses in the consolidated statements of income.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
112
TCCC commissions, based on sales to the TCCC Subsidiaries and the TCCC Related Parties, for the year
ended December 31, 2020 were $56.5 million, and are included as a reduction to net sales. TCCC commissions,
based on sales to the TCCC Independent Bottlers for the year ended December 31, 2020 were $21.4 million, and
are included in operating expenses in the consolidated statements of income.
TCCC commissions, based on sales to the TCCC Subsidiaries and the TCCC Related Parties, for the year
ended December 31, 2019 were $50.1 million, and are included as a reduction to net sales. TCCC commissions,
based on sales to the TCCC Independent Bottlers for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $17.7 million, and
are included in operating expenses in the consolidated statements of income.
Net sales to the TCCC Subsidiaries for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 were $120.4
million, $83.3 million and $79.5 million, respectively.
The Company also purchases concentrates from TCCC which are then sold to certain of the Company’s
bottlers/distributors. Concentrate purchases from TCCC were $27.2 million, $23.9 million and $25.4 million for
the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Certain TCCC Subsidiaries also contract manufacture certain of the Company’s energy drinks. Such
contract manufacturing expenses were $31.5 million, $17.2 million and $17.1 million for the years ended December
31, 2021, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued promotional allowances related to the TCCC
Subsidiaries are as follows at:
December 31, December 31,
2021 2020

Accounts receivable, net
Accounts payable
Accrued promotional allowances
Accrued liabilities
$
$
$
$
94,647 $ 44,925
(30,792)
(5,834)
(15,446)
(35,248) $
(4,536) $
(26,616) $

In 2021, TCCC exercised its contract rights and began an examination in accordance with those rights for
the years ended December 31, 2015 through December 31, 2020.
One director of the Company through certain trusts, and a family member of one director are principal
owners of a company that provides promotional materials to the Company. Expenses incurred with such company
in connection with promotional materials purchased during the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
were $3.6 million, $2.1 million and $1.5 million, respectively.
In December 2018, the Company and a director of the Company entered into a 50-50 partnership that
purchased land, and real property thereon, in Kona, Hawaii for the purpose of producing coffee products. The
Company’s initial 50% contribution of $1.9 million was accounted for as an equity investment. During the year
ended December 31, 2021, the Company recorded an equity loss of $0.2 million. As of December 31, 2021, the
Company’s equity investment is $1.4 million and is included in other assets (non-current) in the accompanying
consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2021.
21. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS
On February 17, 2022, the Company completed its acquisition of CANarchy Craft Brewery Collective LLC
(“CANarchy”), a craft beer and hard seltzer company, for $330.0 million in cash, subject to adjustments. The

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Tabular Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
113
transaction allows us to enter the alcohol beverage sector and brings the Cigar City family of brands including Jai
Alai IPA and Florida Man IPA, the Oskar Blues family of brands including Dale’s Pale Ale and Wild Basin Hard
Seltzers, the Deep Ellum family of brands including Dallas Blonde and Deep Ellum IPA, the Perrin Brewing family
of brands including Black Ale, the Squatters family of brands including Hop Rising Double IPA and Juicy IPA and
the Wasatch family of brands including Apricot Hefeweizen to our beverage portfolio. The transaction does not
include CANarchy’s stand-alone restaurants. The Company’s organizational structure for its existing energy
beverage business will remain unchanged. CANarchy will function independently, retaining its own organizational
structure and team.

MONSTER BEVERAGE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
SCHEDULE II – VALUATION AND QUALIFYING ACCOUNTS
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2021, 2020 AND 2019 (Dollars in Thousands)
114
Balance at Charged to Balance at
beginning cost and end of
Description of period expenses Deductions period
Allowance for doubtful accounts, sales returns and cash discounts:
2021 $ 1,878 $ 14,799 $ (12,001) $ 4,676
2020 $ 2,045 $ 9,664 $ (9,831) $ 1,878
2019 $ 1,589 $ 9,583 $ (9,127) $ 2,045
Allowance on Deferred Tax Assets and Unrecognized Tax Benefits:
2021 $ 35,993 $ (8,980)

$
$
$


$ 27,013
2020 $ 43,853 $ (7,860) $ 35,993
2019 $ 42,748 $ 1,105 $ 43,853

115
Notes
116
Notes